View Poll Results: Do you ride with clipless pedals?

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Thread: Just curious...

  1. #1
    Hikers=SHlT
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    Just curious...

    For those of you that ride with clipless pedals, how many unnecessary crashes have you had due to being clipped in?

    I come from a bmx background and have almost always used crupi style caged pedals, even on my XC bike. Though at times, the pedal bite may be bad, but it's nothing compared to what I've seen when riders have gone down due to being clipped in. I've seen numerous endos and one buddy of mine was unable to get out of his pedals and split his helmet on a rock. Last week on the Heli pad I saw a rider going uphill and he ate sh*t because his rear tire lost traction and he was unable to get out in time.

    I've tried clipless once on my old bmx race bike and I admit, I had more acceleration and control in the air, but I also wasn't riding on rocky terrain like south mountain.

  2. #2
    offtrackmtb
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    I doubt the incidence of crashes AFTER getting used to clipless is any higher than it would be for those riding without who suddenly find their feet airborn and no longer in contact with the pedals. i am a chicken and my clipless learning curve has been steep. I ride Candys and if in doubt I can easily unclip and pedal without.

  3. #3
    Pedaler of dirt
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    Apart from the couple of times I fell sideways while learning to deal with spds I've never (touch wood) fell or crashed because of spds in, so far, 10 years of riding with them.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  4. #4
    Meatbomb
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    3 times....................so far

  5. #5
    oooh, shiny...
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    I fell once due to not clipping out. Well, once that really hurt anyway. It was due to poor shoe maintenance. I lost a bolt out of my cleat and couldn't clip out on an technical section. Took an handlebar to the chest and think I bruised a rib. Since then I check the bolts on my shoes every few rides.

  6. #6
    Hikers=SHlT
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    Any of you guys ride national clipped in?

  7. #7
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    i bought the first iteration of spd pedals and had one accident where i tried to bunny hop over something too big and landed on m chest still clipped in. that was over 18-19 years ago. for the life of me i cant understand the fear that some have over clipless pedals - i find them easy to get out of and its pure reflex when i have to get out to avoid a potential fall. i can understand people that are going for big air, freeriding, or DH not wanting to be clipped in, but for anybody that regularly climbs or does any xc riding at all - i think clipless pedals are a huge benefit.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by StabMasta

    I've tried clipless once on my old bmx race bike and I admit, I had more acceleration and control in the air, but I also wasn't riding on rocky terrain like south mountain.

    LOL, I'm the exact opposite - I run flats at the bmx track and am reluctant to try them on south mountain due to all the rocky terrain. My thinking is that now days BMX tracks are very smooth and so it is easy to keep my feet on the flats but the trails on SoMo are so rough that I think my feet will come flying off the flats. I am sure that sometime in the future I will try flats on my mountain bike.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by StabMasta
    Any of you guys ride national clipped in?
    I can not ride at all unless I am cliped in , ------and yes I ride all of somo up and down always cliped in , ----I just can not pedal and climb well whithout being cliped in .

    I feel way safer and stronger and can do more being cliped in .

  10. #10
    I'm with stupid -------->
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    Quote Originally Posted by scoutcat
    i bought the first iteration of spd pedals and had one accident where i tried to bunny hop over something too big and landed on m chest still clipped in. that was over 18-19 years ago. for the life of me i cant understand the fear that some have over clipless pedals - i find them easy to get out of and its pure reflex when i have to get out to avoid a potential fall. i can understand people that are going for big air, freeriding, or DH not wanting to be clipped in, but for anybody that regularly climbs or does any xc riding at all - i think clipless pedals are a huge benefit.

    What he said... The learning curve takes some time but once you have it down it's second nature. I actually kick out of regular pedals when I ride said equipped bikes.

    I do understand what you are talking about though, I have seen people crash when they can't clip out but these rides are typically not too experienced with clipless. It's a good excuse to ride more!

  11. #11
    EDR
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    Any of you guys ride national clipped in?
    Absolutely.

    I feel like a fish out of water if not clipped in. The more technical, both up or down, the terrain is the more I want to be clipped in. I wouldn't want to be clipped in on a ladder 3 feet above the ground, but there aren't many of those around here, lol.

  12. #12
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    My big problem, and I only have 3 rides clipless so far, is going over rocks or losing momentum in a tech section. Instead of being able to quickly put a foot down and keep moving, I end up stopping or getting hung up and having to un-clip and start over.

  13. #13
    aka Diesel
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    So far only real problem was when I was learning, and that was just because I freaked myself out. Riding on flats for 1.5 years resulted in a nasty recurring soleus injury thanks to the angle I had to keep my feet to stay on the bike during descents, and the grind of all PUSH, no pull.


    I DO have the pedals adjusted to the loosest point, so that I can get out fast, with no issues. Saved my azz more than once. The downside, is while grinding UPHILL, sometimes I come unclipped at inopportune moments. Meh. It's worth the peace of mind.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  14. #14
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    about 3 or 4 times. One was pretty bad, although not a high speed fall, just fell over on some sharps rocks that bruised me up good. The other times i would just get caught up in a tech section and fall over. Its been a while since my last fall and it becomes eaiser to clip out quickly as time goes on.

  15. #15
    Downhill Spokesmodel
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    I've been riding clipless for over ten years (most of that time DH) and have not had any issues with being clipped in or not being able to unclip (save a couple of times that I used new pedals and did not set them up properly or had a hardware issue with the shoes).
    I feel much more secure being clipped in on rough sections and in the air. I tried flats a few times and had issues with my feet slipping off (maybe it was my shoes).
    Worst injury I had was before I went clipless in my XC days, with toeclips trying to show off and starting from a dead stop uphill on Mt. Elden. I fell off the side of the trail and opened a huge gash in my shin. Luckily I was wearing long lycra leggings and that clotted the blood for the rest of the ride. After the ride I changed into jeans and my sock was soaked in blood by the time we got back to Phx.
    I will never give up my old school red cage SPD DH pedals. They don't make them anymore because they dont break. I have 3 sets (4 if you count the set I retired for the wife to put in the mt biking shadowbox) and will buy them anytime I come across them.
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  16. #16
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Sometimes clipless-newbies get clipless pedals, and they don't realize that one of the whole points is increased control, and those people will slow down for the technical sections, and at the speed they are approaching, it's impossible to ride through the section, and they'll stall and do a slow-speed fall, and given certain clipless pedals, it can be quite difficult to get unclipped due to the odd angles you'll fall at. If you are "unclipping" your clipless pedals for the technical sections, you WILL FALL, it's that simple. Not just due to the lack of control, but also just not being agressive enough and letting the bike roll-through with enough momentum (and possibly adding a few pedal-strokes to help it along). The clippless pedals let you "float over" the bike while it rides through, allowing you to stay over it and not get bucked off the pedals.

    There are benefits and situations where flats are usefull, but you can't make a blanket statement about "downhill", and especially National. I'd say that most people that ride National are clipped in, which doesn't mean that you can't ride flats on it, but lots of intermediate and expert riders understand the increased control, which is beneficial to them.

    Considering Goat Camp, all the SoMo trails, everything I've ever ridden, the only place where I wouldn't want to be clipped in would be on high skinnies and doing certain dirt jumps.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  17. #17
    Zipper
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    I run both clipless and flats depending on the ride. Unicycle gets flats( cant Imagine trying clipless on that), run clipless on the tandem and occasionally on the Turner. its really a personal choice. I recommend if your getting a new set to set them as tight as you can when you get them and leave them overnight then reset to loose before putting them on the bike(just helps the tension adjustment with new pedals) but that's just me.
    Zipper aka Rob

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtcha
    Unicycle gets flats( cant Imagine trying clipless on that)
    I'm curious as to why not.

    I have run both clipless and flats for years (and also toe-clips) and find myself liking flats more and more. I even just switched out my Times on my rigid hard tail for flats so I could do more trials-type moves. To me flats are just more fun. If I were racing, then sure I would use clipless, but otherwise I like the freedom of flats.

    Quote Originally Posted by StabMasta
    Last week on the Heli pad I saw a rider going uphill and he ate sh*t because his rear tire lost traction and he was unable to get out in time.
    I see this on a weekly basis.
    "Doing the right thing" is like water. It's good for all living things,and flows without thinking about where it's going.

  19. #19
    Meatbomb
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    I have a unique issue with clipless pedals. I broke my leg and had to have surgery to install a Tibia Rod. When they did this they set the foot at about a 10* angle (toes pointed out more). This causes a situation where I can only unclip my right foot while in motion. I have to stop and put my right foot down in order to get the angle I need to unclip my left. Every fall I have had due to being clipped in has been a result of me getting hung up on something and my momentum taking me to the left and not being able to unclip.

  20. #20
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    I have the type of pedals that have SPD on one side and flat on the other. If I get nervous on a really rocky or technical section, I clip out and flip the pedal over.

  21. #21
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainflow
    I'm curious as to why not.
    Probably because on a unicycle there's nothing to brace against?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Sometimes clipless-newbies get clipless pedals, and they don't realize that one of the whole points is increased control, and those people will slow down for the technical sections, and at the speed they are approaching, it's impossible to ride through the section, and they'll stall and do a slow-speed fall, and given certain clipless pedals, it can be quite difficult to get unclipped due to the odd angles you'll fall at. If you are "unclipping" your clipless pedals for the technical sections, you WILL FALL, it's that simple. Not just due to the lack of control, but also just not being agressive enough and letting the bike roll-through with enough momentum (and possibly adding a few pedal-strokes to help it along). The clippless pedals let you "float over" the bike while it rides through, allowing you to stay over it and not get bucked off the pedals.

    There are benefits and situations where flats are usefull, but you can't make a blanket statement about "downhill", and especially National. I'd say that most people that ride National are clipped in, which doesn't mean that you can't ride flats on it, but lots of intermediate and expert riders understand the increased control, which is beneficial to them.

    Considering Goat Camp, all the SoMo trails, everything I've ever ridden, the only place where I wouldn't want to be clipped in would be on high skinnies and doing certain dirt jumps.

    astute observation. speed keeps you from falling over. its about your riding not about being clipped in.

  23. #23
    And I don't mean the band
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    Out on the trails I ride clipless, it gives me 1000x better control and power on tech sections etc.

    BUT, I realize it lets me get away with a lot of bad habits, so I practice some beginner trials on flats, and it forces me to pay close attention to what I'm doing with my feet. This has actually helped out with the clips and balancing, since it somewhat prevents your feet from flopping around when unclipped.

    I have actually never had a nasty crash caused by clips. Even when riding mormon/national. I have the pedals and cleats adjusted in a way that the clipping and unclipping is fast and under control. There were only a few times where I stopped and forgot about the clips, wanted to put my foot out and fell over. When the terrain gets real nasty, I unclip one foot, so I can dab
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  24. #24
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    2-3 Times at Most. 1st or 2nd ride ever, it's guaranteed you will have a slow momentum side crash - no biggie though. My worst came nearly a year after going SPD clipless. Just west of the 51 tunnel on T100 there is a small vertical. I spun out, and couldn't clip out. I ended up doing a 1.5 summersault sideways attached to the bike. End result - bumps, bruises, banged up elbow, and a long term "Big Ring" scratch on my calf.

    For the benefits I have received, the value of clipless pedals far outweighs the crashes.
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  25. #25
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    I ride SPD's and flats. I think that the shoes make all the difference. My 5.10's need to be peeled off the flat peddles to change my foot position; they are as close to SPD without mechanicals that I have experienced. When I use SPD's, sometimes my left knee gets a little sore, and I run lots of float. I have had many comical falls when I was learning to ride SPD's, but nowadays, there aren't too many.

  26. #26
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    All these threads about clipless vs platform, and the virtues and dangers of each... why not run both? I got some Shimano A530 that have spd on one side and a platform on the other. Drilled and tapped a few m4 sized holes in the platform and screwed in some pins. Best of both worlds now.

    Also: anyone who has difficulty clipping out of pedals in time should practice trackstanding. Balance/bike handling work is probably the one thing that has me crashing less and cleaning more.I know if things get stupid I can bring the bike to halt, and I can take several seconds to size up a line/unclip/freak-out etc.

  27. #27
    Break it, Fix it, Ride it
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    I'm a fan of the SPDs. When I started mountain biking my old Gary Fisher came with the baskets that I used for a few months before I moved on to clipless and found them to be far superior to baskets or riding flats for XC/AM stuff. My climbing was stronger and had much more control bombing some rocky descents. In the few yard sales that I did have I was always able to come out of the pedals without thinking about it. It helps that you can adjust the tension to make it easier or harder to clip in/out. The worst were the slow speed tip-overs that happened while going uphill. That's where I did the most damage and what convinced me to buy a nice pair of gloves. Nothing funnier than falling over sideways going 2 mph and not getting a leg out. But this ends soon enough. Over all, I'd find it hard to ride without the SPDs unless I were hitting gaps, step-ups, step-downs and all together crazy non-xc riding that I really don't do.
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  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunset1123
    All these threads about clipless vs platform, and the virtues and dangers of each... why not run both? .
    Because those types of pedals are the worst of both worlds.

    One of the more difficult things to do with clipless is get clipped back in from a stop in challenging terrain. Clipping out becomes easy and you don't have to think about it, but now you have to "flip" the pedal over with those one-sided abominations, because the SPD mechanism is always heavier and the pedal naturally settles to the "flat side up". Then there's the flat-side, which is pretty poor compared to any real flat pedal in terms of grip, not to mention the SPD cleat interfearing. Even if you do go with a proper shoe, you still have the poor grip/pin design and the fact that if it spins you might put your foot down on the SPD side.

    A real flat pedal can be good for certain situations or people, but those dual sided things are not, nor are they good SPD pedals.

    Beginners think these pedals are a godsend, but they end up being a nightmare. Again, if you think you're going to ride through the technical section better if you "unclip" and flip the pedal to the flat side, you probably wouldn't make it in any situation. You lack the confidence and skill to do it, and yes you are going to fall. If you haven't learned how to release from your clipless pedals, the fall would obviously be that much worse.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  29. #29
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    Flat pedals for DH with some sticky Marzocchi/Five-Ten shoes. Just jump off when things take a turn for the worst.
    Clipless for FR/AM type stuff. They really help me get up and over big rocks. I use Time's DH pedal, so there's some platform to unclip and stand on when things get sketchy- usually a couple times a ride.

  30. #30
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    2 rides, 5 really embarrasing crashes over kiddie terrain cause I could not get out of them soon enough. Never again for the stuff I ride.

  31. #31
    My other ride is your mom
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    I've been riding for over a year now and could not imagine having flats.....period. The learning curve was steep starting out on clipless (more stalling falls than I'd like to remember)....but well worth it. If you have not ridden them long enough to see the benefit or still find them scary....keep riding and falling over until you realize how to stop falling over.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by berzerker
    I use Time's DH pedal, so there's some platform to unclip and stand on when things get sketchy- usually a couple times a ride.
    Those are the same ones I have, and I never could get used to riding unclipped, even with the platform. I pretty much just stayed clipped in all the time.
    "Doing the right thing" is like water. It's good for all living things,and flows without thinking about where it's going.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tls36
    2 rides, 5 really embarrasing crashes over kiddie terrain cause I could not get out of them soon enough. Never again for the stuff I ride.
    Are you using the Shimano type or the Crank Brothers? I had sworn off clipless after some bad experiences with the Crank Bro's because they were very hard to unclip even on the looser setting. I have been using the Shimano's for the past few months and they are much better IMO, though I still end up clipped out for about half the ride many times, and have taken some falls, and near endo's because of them. I tend to ride much more cautiously when clipped in, though I hope that will change with experience.

    I think I need to invest in some shin guards (already use wrist protection since that seems to be where I impact hardest), and practice balancing to gain some confidence.

    I keep thinking that there must be a better way to do this since the movement of unclipping seems un-natural, and the half second it takes to get out, combined with the jerky motion required, disrupts my balance in those bad situations where I see an oh-s... moment rapidly approaching. Seems like the only cure is experience and the only way to get that is to use em, typical catch 22.

  34. #34
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    not once in 19 years of mtb.

  35. #35
    rip the line
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    once I tried to do a step up that was 2 feet or probably higher and started falling backwards and landed flat on my back hard as my wheel was 2 feet higher than the ground I landed on. Also, I don't like to ride wheelies clipped in, had a couple of
    embarassing incidents in the parking lot.
    "I tried to live always free and above board like you" Cool Hand Luke

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Because those types of pedals are the worst of both worlds.

    One of the more difficult things to do with clipless is get clipped back in from a stop in challenging terrain. Clipping out becomes easy and you don't have to think about it, but now you have to "flip" the pedal over with those one-sided abominations, because the SPD mechanism is always heavier and the pedal naturally settles to the "flat side up".
    I have to disagree here... I don't have to think real hard about which side is up... that is immediately apparent to my foot. If it is on the "wrong" side, I just toe tap it and go. Also, the A530 seems to have a mechanism that actually favors the SPD side being up most of the time. So the only time I have to manually rotate the pedal is when I want the platform.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Then there's the flat-side, which is pretty poor compared to any real flat pedal in terms of grip, not to mention the SPD cleat interfearing.
    Like I said... #40 drill bit + tap + 12 m4 threaded pins = $15 at the hardware store. And there is no interferance with the cleat b/c it is a concave platform offset from the pedal spindle. And my mtb shoes have a soft rubber outsole with a stiff insole... grip almost like skate shoes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Beginners think these pedals are a godsend, but they end up being a nightmare. Again, if you think you're going to ride through the technical section better if you "unclip" and flip the pedal to the flat side, you probably wouldn't make it in any situation. You lack the confidence and skill to do it, and yes you are going to fall. If you haven't learned how to release from your clipless pedals, the fall would obviously be that much worse.
    Sometimes I really wish people would post good information that they were actually experienced in... instead they post their wrong assumptions about someone elses experience.

    Obviously you are not describing the pedal setup that I posted about, but some generic (or pricey) two-sided pedal that you used before and hated. Sorry about your luck, but you can't honestly believe that everyone else is going to have the same experience.

    In my experience, there are plenty of sections that I have been able to pick through several lines, experimenting and trial and error on the platforms. And no, most of the time I do not fall. Sometimes I have to dab when things get sketchy. Now I ride those same lines clipped in because I know I can clean them.

    Why do you think trials riders do not ride clipless?!?!? Well now you want to tackle tough technical obstacles and have good efficiency and control on the XC parts of the trail. SPD/platform works well for me to accomplish just this.

    Seriously, sorry for the rant... it just got me the wrong way this morning.

  37. #37
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    Huffy - was using SPD pedals designed for DH.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunsetrider
    once I tried to do a step up that was 2 feet or probably higher and started falling backwards and landed flat on my back hard as my wheel was 2 feet higher than the ground I landed on. Also, I don't like to ride wheelies clipped in, had a couple of
    embarassing incidents in the parking lot.
    This is one fine example of needing to use flats... at least until you really have the skill to do those step-ups in your sleep. Lots of trials riders probably could do it in their sleep, and they still won't run clipless for safety reasons... they don't, however, have to ride the rest of the trail.

    ps: I don't know your skill level, so no offense, but don't think of a step-up like a wheelie. Especially if it is in an uphill direction. Think of it more like a rolling pull-up where you wind up in a standing position and then throw your weight forward to get the bike over the step-up (and avoid falling backwards).

  39. #39
    rip the line
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    Yep, I'm no champion, but I do ride better technically than most of the folks around tucson. I'd say advanced intermediate. Trying to learn those stepups have been a booger for me. I can ride a wheelie for a long ways, but getting up on stuff has me baffled. May have to buy a 29er. The wife will just love that.
    "I tried to live always free and above board like you" Cool Hand Luke

  40. #40
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    I loved my CrankBros out in Vermont, but I destroyed two pairs of Candies within three months of moving to AZ. Too many hits on rocks and the beater-bars caved in to make it near impossible to clip in or out. Shimano's seem near indestructible.

    Except...anyone else notice that SPD springs get super finicky (too loose...no wait! too tight!) out in the desert? I might eat it on a technical uphill or step-up after finding I can't unclip for the bail. Then within 20 minutes they will be so loose that I experience an unfortunate unclip on a jump.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by jean-louey
    I loved my CrankBros out in Vermont, but I destroyed two pairs of Candies within three months of moving to AZ. Too many hits on rocks and the beater-bars caved in to make it near impossible to clip in or out. Shimano's seem near indestructible.

    Except...anyone else notice that SPD springs get super finicky (too loose...no wait! too tight!) out in the desert? I might eat it on a technical uphill or step-up after finding I can't unclip for the bail. Then within 20 minutes they will be so loose that I experience an unfortunate unclip on a jump.
    You do realize SPDs are two-sided, right? Like, you might have one side tightened way tighter than the other? There's no telling which side spins to the top when you clip in...until it's too late!

    I mention this because getting both sides of my SPDs equalized is a recurring issue for me.

    p.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jean-louey
    I loved my CrankBros out in Vermont, but I destroyed two pairs of Candies within three months of moving to AZ. Too many hits on rocks and the beater-bars caved in to make it near impossible to clip in or out. Shimano's seem near indestructible.

    Except...anyone else notice that SPD springs get super finicky (too loose...no wait! too tight!) out in the desert? I might eat it on a technical uphill or step-up after finding I can't unclip for the bail. Then within 20 minutes they will be so loose that I experience an unfortunate unclip on a jump.
    Paul may have a point, but SPDs are also way more complicated. dirt etc gets in there...who knows. I find them fine for my XC and commuter where I dont need to get out much or under crazy circumstances, but i have become a total convert to Times for tech riding. there is just very little to tune, very little to go wrong. It was a bit harder getting out my first ride or 2, but from then on they are just so predictable and easy to maintain imo.

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    i'm stunned that so many have problems with spd pedals. focus on the ride, your reflexes will get you out when needed. ride more quickly and get a better spin going uphill so you dont lose balance. putting a foot down for balance in a technical situation is more likely to cause a fall then powering thru. have speed and steer the bike where you want. tires rolling keep you upright. htfu.

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    Paul and Jason, thanks for the reminder on my double sided clips. I checked that first. It is hard to get them even, but I even loosened all the tension adjusters to the full extent. It is definitely something weird about my springs because they can feel wicked loose (a bit of play) and then really clippy (bad description, but imagine it feels like a barrier to unclipping). This is getting too detailed for the AZ forum and if I cared enough I would take it elsewhere...

    Possible that a lack of use had a role. They felt fine this morning and I can tighten them back up some. Too much travel and injury has kept me off the bike and I guess they got gunked up. Gotta keep that bike happy and on the trail!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jean-louey
    Paul and Jason, thanks for the reminder on my double sided clips. I checked that first. It is hard to get them even, but I even loosened all the tension adjusters to the full extent. It is definitely something weird about my springs because they can feel wicked loose (a bit of play) and then really clippy (bad description, but imagine it feels like a barrier to unclipping). This is getting too detailed for the AZ forum and if I cared enough I would take it elsewhere...

    Possible that a lack of use had a role. They felt fine this morning and I can tighten them back up some. Too much travel and injury has kept me off the bike and I guess they got gunked up. Gotta keep that bike happy and on the trail!
    the condition of the cleat can add to the feeling of how easy it sticks in. Also if the cleat itself is gunky or rusty. Sometimes a spritz of WD40 can help, but that might make you kinda fly out too quickly. good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    the condition of the cleat can add to the feeling of how easy it sticks in. Also if the cleat itself is gunky or rusty. Sometimes a spritz of WD40 can help, but that might make you kinda fly out too quickly. good luck.
    Once again... WD40 is not a good lubricant. You can use it to clean cleats and spd bindings, but hit the moving parts with some TriFlow afterwards. Makes a huge difference, and you might find yourself tightening the spds back up just a little.

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    Oh yeah...cleat wear definitely makes clipping in/out a dicey proposition. The more it's worn, the less material is pushing against the retention device and therefore the tougher it is to unclip from it. Add to the fact that one side of your SPD may be more worn than the other -- or damaged by a rock hit! -- and you have several combinations of potential problems:

    Fresh cleat + fresh pedal + even tension between both sides = joy
    Any other combination = deathtrap

    p.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul B
    Oh yeah...cleat wear definitely makes clipping in/out a dicey proposition. The more it's worn, the less material is pushing against the retention device and therefore the tougher it is to unclip from it. Add to the fact that one side of your SPD may be more worn than the other -- or damaged by a rock hit! -- and you have several combinations of potential problems:

    Fresh cleat + fresh pedal + even tension between both sides = joy
    Any other combination = deathtrap

    p.
    And with Crank Brother's pedals, those new cleats last almost a few weeks.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    Paul may have a point, but SPDs are also way more complicated. dirt etc gets in there...who knows. I find them fine for my XC and commuter where I dont need to get out much or under crazy circumstances, but i have become a total convert to Times for tech riding. there is just very little to tune, very little to go wrong. It was a bit harder getting out my first ride or 2, but from then on they are just so predictable and easy to maintain imo.
    The newer-style SPDs, 520s, 540s, XTs, XTRs and 647s have a much more simplified mechnism that sheds mud/dirt pretty well, much better than previous designs like my 545s and old SPD and clone mechanisms.

    Anyway, I wouldn't have a problem using times. They seem to hold up just fine. CB on the other hand has the market cornered for disposable pedals and other disposable products.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

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