View Poll Results: Have you ever cut down a tree to build a trail...?

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  • Yes, that's what chainsaws are for.......braaaaaaaap

    10 40.00%
  • No, that kind of trail work is illegal and you should go to jail

    6 24.00%
  • Screw you hippie!!!

    9 36.00%
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  1. #1
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    Have you ever cut down a tree to build a trail?

    Discuss...

  2. #2
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    most of the trees are more than 28 inches apart ,why would you? Oh yeah, ladders and bridges,never done that. Most of the ladders and bridges i've seen were built from fallen or dead trees.

  3. #3
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    I see this thread getting bad...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubo
    I see this thread getting bad...

    Not sure why it has to get bad? It's ok to cut down a tree to build a trophy home or for clear cutting, so what's wrong with cutting down a tree to use the wood to build a sick feature.

  5. #5
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    Most trees that are cut for homes come from managed growth areas. Cutting a tree down, if it's not on your own property, for a trail or feature, should be avoided.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  6. #6
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    with a proper wood cutting permit most trees fall legally. what gets done with them is the trail builders choice. and yes i own a chainsaw!
    j

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy
    Most trees that are cut for homes come from managed growth areas. Cutting a tree down, if it's not on your own property, for a trail or feature, should be avoided.

    Why? I don't really see a dif. between the two as long as it's done properlly.

  8. #8
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    Had to cut out a few trees to build trails on Sunrise.
    Especially on Fungus.
    Now I DRIVE the short bus!!


    Help increase ShortBus' rep

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    done properlly.
    that is exactly the point. so ask the question...."is the trail you're building completely approved by the land manager?"

    If so the answer to you're question is much simpler.
    b

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianc
    that is exactly the point. so ask the question...."is the trail you're building completely approved by the land manager?"

    If so the answer to you're question is much simpler.

    So it's ok if it's aproved by the Land Manager?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    So it's ok if it's aproved by the Land Manager?
    What do you mean by "done properly"?
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjonboy
    Most trees that are cut for homes come from managed growth areas. Cutting a tree down, if it's not on your own property, for a trail or feature, should be avoided.
    You sure about that?

    (even has MTBer commentary)
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  13. #13
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    My response to extreme environmentalists.

    Any one who is anti logging needs to read the paragraph down below. First off, let me say that I love the outdoors and grew up in Oregon in a small lumber town, hunting and fishing, and I do not like to see improper timber management. Most loggers, (I was a timber faller for many years) love the woods and mountains, and all that goes with it. But they also have families to support, and an industry that is based on the demand of every person in this country. So here is a little story to contemplate.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (I was on the way home from work one day, filling up my gas jugs at a station, when this idiot in a BMW starts lecturing me about my killing of trees. Here is my response, and something all of us should think about, especially those that criticize logging before they even think.)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sir, I bet you are going to go home and park your Beemer in your wooden garage.(nice wood grained interior on that Beemer by the way. )Then you are going to walk across your wooden deck, past your redwood hot-tub. Then you will enter your beautiful house(guess what it is mostly built with, heck,it might even be a log cabin). Then you will go to the fridge, pull out a carton of milk and nuke a microwave meal and have a snack. Afterwords you will run to the can and plop down on your wooden toilet seat, and pick up the latest copy of "Sierra Club" magazine where you will read about those terrible loggers. Then you will pick up a pencil and do part of the crossword in the newspaper. After which you will wipe your arse with toilet paper. Then you will retire to the comfort of your living room with all of its wood furniture, tables, and entertainment centers, where you will plop a little log on the old fireplace for some ambiance. Then you will go to your desk(nice maple I might add), break out your pad, pencil, and envelopes, and write a letter to some politician demanding that those nasty loggers quit killing all the beautiful trees!!

    So to anyone who complains about the clearcutting and deforestation. If you fit any of the scenario up above, then you should just STFU!!!!!!!

  14. #14
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    When I built Renegade in Whistler I believe I cut down about 150 trees for the 1/3 mile strech between Side Track and Dirt Merchant. On the steep sideslope sections I used the trees on the outside edge to act as a soil retainer they worked great.

    TD

  15. #15
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    Any one who is anti logging needs to read the paragraph down below. First off, let me say that I love the outdoors and grew up in Oregon in a small lumber town, hunting and fishing, and I do not like to see improper timber management. Most loggers, (I was a timber faller for many years) love the woods and mountains, and all that goes with it. But they also have families to support, and an industry that is based on the demand of every person in this country. So here is a little story to contemplate.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (I was on the way home from work one day, filling up my gas jugs at a station, when this idiot in a BMW starts lecturing me about my killing of trees. Here is my response, and something all of us should think about, especially those that criticize logging before they even think.)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sir, I bet you are going to go home and park your Beemer in your wooden garage.(nice wood grained interior on that Beemer by the way. )Then you are going to walk across your wooden deck, past your redwood hot-tub. Then you will enter your beautiful house(guess what it is mostly built with, heck,it might even be a log cabin). Then you will go to the fridge, pull out a carton of milk and nuke a microwave meal and have a snack. Afterwords you will run to the can and plop down on your wooden toilet seat, and pick up the latest copy of "Sierra Club" magazine where you will read about those terrible loggers. Then you will pick up a pencil and do part of the crossword in the newspaper. After which you will wipe your arse with toilet paper. Then you will retire to the comfort of your living room with all of its wood furniture, tables, and entertainment centers, where you will plop a little log on the old fireplace for some ambiance. Then you will go to your desk(nice maple I might add), break out your pad, pencil, and envelopes, and write a letter to some politician demanding that those nasty loggers quit killing all the beautiful trees!!

    So to anyone who complains about the clearcutting and deforestation. If you fit any of the scenario up above, then you should just STFU!!!!!!!
    +1 and agree. now I gotta go ride some skinnies on the railroad ties I bought in bulk.
    "I tried to live always free and above board like you" Cool Hand Luke

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    ...

    So to anyone who complains about the clearcutting and deforestation. If you fit any of the scenario up above, then you should just STFU!!!!!!!
    I'm not anti-logging. I too grew up in a logging town - Weaverville, CA.

    I am anti- poor forestry management. Clear-cutting definitely falls into poor forestry management and is done for the major corporate profit (Sierra Pacific, Weyerhaeuser, etc). It's not necessarily the small time or piece-loggers fault either.
    These same companies don't care about small communities and families; shutting down sawmills and sending the timber offshore to be milled where there is no regulation and again, done to maximize profit.

    Clear cutting: disrupts habitat, leaves the soil bare and prone to land slides and causes damage to waterways. When/if the forest comes back it is usually one or two species of trees and grows up in such a way that they are all of the same age.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    I'm not anti-logging. I too grew up in a logging town - Weaverville, CA.

    I am anti- poor forestry management. Clear-cutting definitely falls into poor forestry management and is done for the major corporate profit (Sierra Pacific, Weyerhaeuser, etc). It's not necessarily the small time or piece-loggers fault either.
    These same companies don't care about small communities and families; shutting down sawmills and sending the timber offshore to be milled where there is no regulation and again, done to maximize profit.

    Clear cutting: disrupts habitat, leaves the soil bare and prone to land slides and causes damage to waterways. When/if the forest comes back it is usually one or two species of trees and grows up in such a way that they are all of the same age.
    I agree, there is a lot of piss poor timber management.

    A lot of it is on Forest Service land too. I remember a place back home where you are driving through a section of forest that looks like a park. It belongs to a timber company that manages it for sustainability, for the future. Then you enter "National Forest Land" and it looks like a war zone!! WTF!! I would have thought it was the private company land that looks bad, but they take care of the land they own. The problems is companies that log land they DON'T own. Then they tend to rape and pillage.

    Clearcutting is not a cut and dry issue. Have you ever tried to log steep ground? Cat logging is not viable. Helicopter logging is very expensive, and in many cases just can't be profitable.

    That leaves yarder logging.
    And if you log with a yarder, you cannot have anything standing or it will kill the loggers. If a tree hits a standing tree while being yarded up, it can dislodge the log, sending it down the hill to crush the crew. Or it can snap the skyline which can whip down the hill and cut people in two. Or it will break off the standing tree and send it down on the crew. Or it will topple the yarder down the hill. That is why you can't selective cut on a yarder job.

    The biggest thing is to have proper replanting of a logged off unit. This prevents erosion even in a clear cut. We used to hunt clear cuts a lot when I was growing up. Why? Because berries, and grasses and other food would grow there that would attract the deer and bears. A clearcut area can actually be quite a haven for animal species as long as they only make up a certain percentage of an area. Obvously if you clear cut too large a percentage of an area, then it is detrimental. But if it is limited, it is not really harmful, and provides areas of good feeding for many species.

    Showing just pictures of a total clearcut with bare dirt everywhere is a little misleading, and can be downright disengenuous. Most clearcuts are like areas that have forest fires, and they have very rapid recovery if managed properly.

    I have taken people into areas where they said "What a beautiful old growth forest!" And then I showed them old stumps hidden under berry briars, and rotting away, and showed them it was a second growth forest.

  18. #18
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    the recent fire on Shultz would have not have been as bad if more trees of snaller diameter had been removed.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    When I built Renegade in Whistler I believe I cut down about 150 trees for the 1/3 mile strech between Side Track and Dirt Merchant. On the steep sideslope sections I used the trees on the outside edge to act as a soil retainer they worked great.

    TD

    Now that sounds like some good forest management to me.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    You sure about that?

    (even has MTBer commentary)
    You just have to love the irony of the video.

    Where he stands and points at his big paper maps taped to the side of a wooden building.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    You just have to love the irony of the video.

    Where he stands and points at his big paper maps taped to the side of a wooden building.
    Hmm, well I don't see that as ironic.
    There are ways to get wood with out destroying the forest - that wood may have come from that.
    Maps? - even more ways to make paper that do not even involve forests
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  22. #22
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    OP needs to clarify. Is this a tree still standing or deadfall? On a hill or flat ground? How many trees per acre? Once cut, will it be used in the trail as berm, jump, bench? It takes some work for good results.
    As for the question, Yes! Lots. My tree project that I keep looking at is on Jedi. Four downfall trees that storms dropped a year ago. Everyone now walks around this mess. But If I made about four cuts and use a come-along to drag a 50' log back onto the original track it would make a nice log ride. Its debatable if one would make a top cut along the log to make a flat track rather than a rounded skinny. Then make a cut on the end of the log so riders can enter the entertainment as a ramp. That would be proud!
    There is a big difference between ripping and skidding.

  23. #23
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    We cut down lotsa dead trees to build the ladder drop "6 Hits" on six shooter. As long as they are dead, i dont see a problem.
    Madspeed always prevails!

  24. #24
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    I have never seen the need to cut down a Palo Verde Tree but one ever gets in my way of some sweet lines around a cholla the suckers going down.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    Hmm, well I don't see that as ironic.
    There are ways to get wood with out destroying the forest - that wood may have come from that.
    Maps? - even more ways to make paper that do not even involve forests
    Yes, "no actual trees were harmed during the making of this building".

    I think I also saw a disclaimer in small print on the map. "Made only from free range trees, locally grown, and clear cut free."

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