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Thread: Ghetto Tubeless

  1. #1
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    Ghetto Tubeless

    So I just converted to ghetto tubeless and quickly found out that I have a 1/8" cut in the top of the tire (tread). The homemade sealant sealed it instantly. Should I just use it as is or should I break it down and patch the tire? I'm running maxxis Larsen TT non-UST. I guess the other option would be to tell my wife that my tires are trashed and I need new ones....

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    I would just use it. The tires I just replaced has several slashes that size and more thorns than I could count. If you get a slash on the sidewall, especially close to the bead of the tire, I would recommend replacing, but in the tread area you should be fine.
    "Confidence is the feeling you have before you fully understand the situation".

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcsxj View Post
    I guess the other option would be to tell my wife that my tires are trashed and I need new ones....
    Problem solved....might want to add in flowers and a nice dinner or two into the price for tires..

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirthead View Post
    I would just use it. The tires I just replaced has several slashes that size and more thorns than I could count. If you get a slash on the sidewall, especially close to the bead of the tire, I would recommend replacing, but in the tread area you should be fine.
    Take along a 1/4" long sheet metal screw to plug the hole if it starts weeping. Let us know how long the tire lasted you before you replaced it, and if you ever used the screw. There is also a small tubeless fix kit: http://www.amazon.com/Innovations-Tu.../dp/B000P1RP48 . I think you can just jamb in some type of material to do the same thing.

    TD

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    When I did my first set I tried it with a fairly well worn set of Velociraptors. I discovered quickly that there was a very good sized hole, about the same size you are speaking of, right at the shoulder of the tread. It didn't seal instantly but I figured before I take this beach out on the trail and get stuck walking I'd bang it around here a little. Grabbed the fully inflated and sealed tire and started bouncing it as hard as I could directly on the hole that the brew had sealed. After a couple knocks the seal broke loose and blew out the remaining sealant all over the garage floor. So, I put a new tire on. You may wanna try to beat that tire up like I did before you hit the trail with it.

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    Good idea traildoc! I'll post back up if it fails.

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    You can also poke a small piece of tshirt in the hole instead of the screw or with the screw.

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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    When I did my first set I tried it with a fairly well worn set of Velociraptors. I discovered quickly that there was a very good sized hole, about the same size you are speaking of, right at the shoulder of the tread. It didn't seal instantly but I figured before I take this beach out on the trail and get stuck walking I'd bang it around here a little. Grabbed the fully inflated and sealed tire and started bouncing it as hard as I could directly on the hole that the brew had sealed. After a couple knocks the seal broke loose and blew out the remaining sealant all over the garage floor. So, I put a new tire on. You may wanna try to beat that tire up like I did before you hit the trail with it.
    Yeah, the first time it sealed at about 30 or so psi. I read to seat the bead to inflate to 50 or 60 psi. It let go for a spilt second somewhere around 60 psi but seal right up again.

  9. #9
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    I would just pull the tire back off and patch it. You should be able to do so without loosing any sealant, and have a bit of reassurance that it is going to hold. Or, you can spend 3 times the amount of time getting it to seal, and have that in the back of your mind every time you drop off of something. Just speaking from my own experience on this one....

    Edit- I wouldn't bother replacing it unless I didn't like it or something. A patch will work, and you wont even have to bother the wife about the $0.39 charge on the joint debit card.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

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    I run Stans/tubeless-ready, but this ought to work for anyone running tubeless. I had a small hole in the sidewall (<1/8) that would not seal. I took one of the thousands of leaky tubes (from my pre-tubeless days that I won't throw out because I JUST KNOW that I will find something useful to do with them...will too...I am NOT a hoarder...am NOT...I know you are but what am I?) hanging in my garage and cut a 1"x1" square. I slathered some Stans on one side of it, waited for it to get a little tacky, popped the tire off the bead at the hole, pressed the patch against the inside of the tire over the hole, popped the tire back on the bead, re-inflated, and I haven't had a problem in ~50 miles. I now carry several rubber square patches with me (in addition to an emergency inner tube, of course).
    "Bicycling...is the nearest approximation I know to the flight of birds." Louis Halle

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by GilaMonster View Post
    I run Stans/tubeless-ready, but this ought to work for anyone running tubeless. I had a small hole in the sidewall (<1/8) that would not seal. I took one of the thousands of leaky tubes (from my pre-tubeless days that I won't throw out because I JUST KNOW that I will find something useful to do with them...will too...I am NOT a hoarder...am NOT...I know you are but what am I?) hanging in my garage and cut a 1"x1" square. I slathered some Stans on one side of it, waited for it to get a little tacky, popped the tire off the bead at the hole, pressed the patch against the inside of the tire over the hole, popped the tire back on the bead, re-inflated, and I haven't had a problem in ~50 miles. I now carry several rubber square patches with me (in addition to an emergency inner tube, of course).
    A little tube of super glue will work good, just in case your stan's dries out. As somebody I rode with this weekend found out the hard way, check the inside of the tire before using your emergency tube.

    I now carry patches, a slimed tube, and a 2 oz bottle of stans.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

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    Quote Originally Posted by GilaMonster View Post
    I had a small hole in the sidewall (<1/8) that would not seal. I took one of the thousands of leaky tubes ... I slathered some Stans on one side of it, waited for it to get a little tacky, popped the tire off the bead at the hole, pressed the patch against the inside of the tire over the hole, popped the tire back on the bead, re-inflated...
    Quote Originally Posted by woahey View Post
    A little tube of super glue will work good, just in case your stan's dries out.
    Ditto, whoahey. I even think there's a thread all about supergluing like this...

    sealant vs. superglue

  13. #13
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    Ok so I'm going on my first tubeless ride tomorrow am. Is there a recommended tire pressure for the first tubeless ride?

    Me - 210lbs
    Bike - Hardtail
    Trail - Mormon / National

    I like to think I don't ***** foot around to much for being a rookie!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcsxj View Post
    Ok so I'm going on my first tubeless ride tomorrow am. Is there a recommended tire pressure for the first tubeless ride?

    Me - 210lbs
    Bike - Hardtail
    Trail - Mormon / National

    I like to think I don't ***** foot around to much for being a rookie!!!
    Most people are in the 25-35 lb range. You'll have to play around until you find a comfortable pressure. It will also depend on your tires. I had Weirwolf that I really liked up front but at the pressure I like it burped all day long.

    I'm running my WTB Dissent & Prowler now somewhere around 25-28 lbs and I do have some "leakage" after each ride around the bead (?) I've not burped or lost any air during a ride and the tires feel good under me.

    I'd say fill 'em to the firmness you had 'em at with tubes and let a little air out. Ride that for a few rides and see how you like it. If you have no issues let a little more air out. Keep playing on it until you find the pressure you like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcsxj View Post
    Ok so I'm going on my first tubeless ride tomorrow am. Is there a recommended tire pressure for the first tubeless ride?

    Me - 210lbs
    Bike - Hardtail
    Trail - Mormon / National

    I like to think I don't ***** foot around to much for being a rookie!!!
    I started at 10% less than my normal tubed riding pressure. I adjusted it down a little, but not much. I was running about 33-35 tubed and 28-30 tubeless. I can go softer, but feel like I'm riding through sand if I do.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

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    Cool, I'll set them at 30 and see what happens!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcsxj View Post
    Yeah, the first time it sealed at about 30 or so psi. I read to seat the bead to inflate to 50 or 60 psi. It let go for a spilt second somewhere around 60 psi but seal right up again.
    Wow, where'd you read this?? UST maybe, NOT for regular tires running tubeless!

    40 psi max, if the bead isn't seating properly air it down to about 10 and flex it sideways (pulling it away from the rim on one side, then the other) to try to pull the bead up into place. Using soap suds along the bead/rim interface will help it to snap in to place.

    Going over 40, and up to 60 is a great way to stretch the bead and blow the tire off the rim. It's also a great way to cover yourself and everything around you in sealant (I've seen big, dripping splooges of the stuff on 20' high ceilings before) and make your ears ring from the explosion. Once that happens I won't trust the tire tubeless anymore.

  18. #18
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    It was on one of the tubeless threads on this site.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Bart View Post
    Wow, where'd you read this?? UST maybe, NOT for regular tires running tubeless! 40 psi max, ...
    Quote Originally Posted by jcsxj View Post
    It was on one of the tubeless threads on this site.
    Don't feel bad. I read the same thing and tried it my first time. Didn't think it made any difference pumping them to 50 even before I was corrected.

  20. #20
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    40 is my magic number

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grave9 View Post
    40 is my magic number
    See, James... I didn't put 40 in my tubes yet Drew feels comfortable there.

  22. #22
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    How big can a hole/cut be and still be patched? I got about a 1/2" slash in a brand new purgatory this morning and would like to fix it if possible, rather than trash it. It leaked all the air out in just a few seconds.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz View Post
    How big can a hole/cut be and still be patched? I got about a 1/2" slash in a brand new purgatory this morning and would like to fix it if possible, rather than trash it. It leaked all the air out in just a few seconds.
    Is it sidewall? Is it a front tire? I've never been a big fan of patching a sidewall, or a front tire. Patching in the tread is usually pretty safe.

    There's a variety of patches that can be used. A "patch-plug" is going to hold up the best, but being as it is an automotive product it is pretty heavy. If you have an old tube you could cut a small section out, and super-glue it on the inside of the tire. I would most definitely keep a slimed tube in my pack if running a patched tire tubeless.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  24. #24
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    I just converted to ghetto tubeless and quickly found out that I have a 1/8" cut in the top of the tire (tread). The homemade sealant sealed it instantly
    What is this ghetto homemade sealant? Can you please provide a link? Thanx!

    Edit:
    Ok I got it now
    Last edited by manokaiser; 07-09-2011 at 06:13 PM.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by woahey View Post
    Is it sidewall? Is it a front tire? I've never been a big fan of patching a sidewall, or a front tire. Patching in the tread is usually pretty safe.

    There's a variety of patches that can be used. A "patch-plug" is going to hold up the best, but being as it is an automotive product it is pretty heavy. If you have an old tube you could cut a small section out, and super-glue it on the inside of the tire. I would most definitely keep a slimed tube in my pack if running a patched tire tubeless.
    In the tread on the rear. I knew about the piece of tube and super glue fix but this hole is big enough to kinda spread open when aired up. I wasn't sure if the tube patch would hold. I have loads of old tubes laying around in the garage so really I have nothing to lose. I'll give it a shot.

    And I ALWAYS carry a tube with me. Saved me from having to walk the bike a few miles back to the truck this morning.

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