Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    How much further ???
    Reputation: Douger-1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,157

    Drive Train Wear

    So I put on a new chain the other day and went for a 10 mile ride. The entire time something felt like it was slipping under heavy pedaling load. Im assuming since the only thing that changed is the chain that the new chain no longer matches up with what Im assuming to be worn out chain rings and cassette. I've already ordered new rings and cassette but I was wondering what kind of miles people get on their drive train?

    I know I probably should have changed the chain sooner but I always end up losing track of my miles and the days fly by. Anyway looking back and making an educated guess Id say I have around ~1500-2000 miles on this chain/drive train.
    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did." Mark Twain

  2. #2
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
    Reputation: azdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    3,983
    2-3 chain replacement per cassette. I ride 2-5 times a week with split time between 3 bikes. Not sure on mileage though. Also, make sure the chain length matches up as well using the old chain as a guide unless you have removed multiple links over time.
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  3. #3
    bland
    Reputation: m77ranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,278
    One of these can save you a bunch of cash. tool I'm not sure how many miles I get out of my stuff but I ride ~3-4 times a week and Iv'e replaced one cassette and one chainring in the last four years. I go through about 3 chains a year.

  4. #4
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,034

    Re: Drive Train Wear

    get a $10 chain checker tool. If you replace your chain each time it shows wear, you will get two to three cassettes per chain. At least that's my experience. The tool is not necessary, I just find that owning one I use it much more often then breaking out a tape measure. No idea on mileage though.

  5. #5
    parenting for gnarness
    Reputation: chollaball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    5,783
    had a similar situation where a new chain kept slipping off my granny ring - the granny was ~3 yrs old and it had just gotten worn. A pro I know replaces chains every 60 hrs. Mileage on mtb is not really a good calculator, imo. I use a chain tool like others mention - if you keep on it and replace in timely manner your parts wil last a long time. If you let it go too long, all the rings and cassette could become suspect in my experience.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    984
    I just measure chain wear with a tape measure. 1/16" elongation over 1' of chain is ok after that chuck it.

    I have 5,000 miles on my road bike with 4 chains and the original cog and rings. I've been swapping drivetrain on my MTB to fast to wear anything out. I will be watching my new XX1 very closely though.
    Last edited by azpoolguy; 04-23-2013 at 11:56 AM.

  7. #7
    Give it a crank
    Reputation: Mtn-Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,998
    In a year, I go through about 2-3 chains, 1-2 cassettes, and maybe a small chainring or whole crankset plus a bottom bracket. That's with about 2k miles on our AZ dirt trails.

    The largest cassette cog is consistently the first to go, since it gets used the most climbing steep trails.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,157
    Quote Originally Posted by azpoolguy View Post
    I just measure chain wear with a tape measure. 1/16" elongation over 1' of chain is ok after that chuck it.

    I have 5,000 miles on my road bike with 4 chains and the original cog and rings. I've been swapping drivetrain on my MTB to fast to wear anything out. I will be watching my new XX1 very closely though.
    Yup, doesn't take a special tool. We had the special tools, including the one for the cassette, but really a 12" ruler or a tape-measure works just as good.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metalaficionado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,666
    Great thread.

    So is there some general guidelines for replacing the chain based on miles, time and maybe even feet climbed. This is where strava comes in handy in keeping track of your miles, otherwise I would have no idea.

  10. #10
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,443
    Miles, climbing, dirt you roll in, bikepacking wear vs. regular wear (yes...there's a difference)....it all factors into the wear.....but there's no good/easy way to figure it. The simplest way is to do as others say here....get a ruler, or a chain checker. The chain checker is a cheep tool and does not rely on you being sober to read off the fine print on that ruler when you're on your 5th Sex Panther and just looking to see if it's time to change your chain......just my 2 cents....but I provide good advice here because I live the bad advice......I care. Hugs!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: woahey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,289
    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    The chain checker is a cheep tool and does not rely on you being sober to read off the fine print on that ruler when you're on your 5th Sex Panther and just looking to see if it's time to change your chain......just my 2 cents....but I provide good advice here because I live the bad advice......I care. Hugs!
    I think this may be the most useful piece of info on here so far this year. Way to go!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,132
    Everyone who said get a chain checker is spot on. You want to try to replace your chain before your cassette or cogs are worn too much.

    Look on the bright side....if you wait too long, you get MORE new stuff!!!

  13. #13
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,157
    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    The chain checker is a cheep tool and does not rely on you being sober to read off the fine print on that ruler when you're on your 5th Sex Panther and just looking to see if it's time to change your chain......just my 2 cents!
    I would pay good money though to see you install a chain after 5 Sex Panthers.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,458
    Next time I go to REI to return some snake bite tubes, I'll pick up a chain gauge.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    Next time I go to REI to return some snake bite tubes, I'll pick up a chain gauge.
    Please tell me snake bite is a brand of tube, and you're not returning tires that have pinch flatted.






    (Or maybe I just got trolled)

  16. #16
    Beer Drnkr w/bike problem
    Reputation: TacoBeer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    625
    Get a single speed with steel cogs and chain rings, ride till the chain breaks then replace. Replace the chain that is.
    "Not drinking is the Single Speed World Championships version of doping" -Jacquie Phelan

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by GR1822 View Post
    Please tell me snake bite is a brand of tube, and you're not returning tires that have pinch flatted.






    (Or maybe I just got trolled)
    No troll. Totally cereal.

    100% lifetime no condition satisfaction guarantee at REI. If it gets a snake bite and won't hold air, I'm not very satisfied with it. Right? Exchange it for another one that I'll hopefully be satisfied with. Then, one of you guys can camp out at 4AM so you can have a chance to buy my snake bit tubes for $.20 on the dollar at the garage sale and patch it and ride on the cheap. I see it as doing a community service for my low income riding brethren.

    That's the main reason I gladly pay more to shop at REI.

  18. #18
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
    Reputation: azdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    3,983
    Quote Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    No troll. Totally cereal.
    You're still riding tubes? Returning snakebit tires...that is almost as bad as TRB returning sliced specialized tires.
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    No troll. Totally cereal.

    100% lifetime no condition satisfaction guarantee at REI. If it gets a snake bite and won't hold air, I'm not very satisfied with it. Right? Exchange it for another one that I'll hopefully be satisfied with. Then, one of you guys can camp out at 4AM so you can have a chance to buy my snake bit tubes for $.20 on the dollar at the garage sale and patch it and ride on the cheap. I see it as doing a community service for my low income riding brethren.

    That's the main reason I gladly pay more to shop at REI.
    Wow

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,458
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    You're still riding tubes? Returning snakebit tires...that is almost as bad as TRB returning sliced specialized tires.
    I only ride tubes on my single speed road bike. I'll never ride tubes on a MTB again. Five months of hard use out of an $8 Slime tube is a pretty good run, I guess.

    I don't really see the issue with returning bad tubes to REI. Their policy is that they'll take it back, and while I'm in there, I'll pick up a chain tool and some lube that they'll make money on. You can get anything at REI cheaper somewhere else, but the after sale support is what keeps me coming back.

    Hell, I got a $107 dividend this year, meaning they separated me from over $1000, a dividend that I promptly turned around on other stuff from them. No tears will be shed by me over the returned snake bit tubes.

  21. #21
    Got a suspension fork
    Reputation: randyharris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,324
    My lightweight alloy chainring lasted over 3,000 miles so I'll stay away from the flexy steel ones…

    But yeah the life of a nice cog is a LONG TIME.

    I recently bought one of those Park chain tools, it was worth a few bucks, far easier and faster to check your chain stretch.

    Picture of the Park tool.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metalaficionado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,666
    So wait, are you all saying that worn down chain wears down the cassette and chainrings?

    Considering that a price of a chain is not much more than a tire, it probably makes sense to get a new one more often then.

  23. #23
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,443
    Quote Originally Posted by metalaficionado View Post
    So wait, are you all saying that worn down chain wears down the cassette and chainrings?

    Considering that a price of a chain is not much more than a tire, it probably makes sense to get a new one more often then.
    Yes Virginia, there is no Santa Claus..........Chain Maintenance

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cstem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,370

    Drive Train Wear

    Something to keep in mind is how a chain and the sprockets work. The sprockets are designed with ramps on them to allow a chain to climb up them when nudged by the derailleur. Many of us make slight derailleur cable adjustments as time goes on and some of that adjustment is due to chain wear.

    A new chain has nice sharp edges that climb better than a worn one. I always "reset" the adjustments to a new chain when I rode gears, and even started replacing cables at the same time later in my geared life. Try an adjustment before you replace the rest of the drivetrain.


    Sent from your Moms phone using Tapinthat.
    Find a ride on FB> AZ MTB

    "Uppercase with a space"

Similar Threads

  1. Drive train help
    By Beau44 in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-31-2012, 09:48 PM
  2. Drive Train Issue
    By epg0 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-18-2012, 03:08 PM
  3. 2x9 drive train (22t/36t)
    By njonesy_07 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-04-2012, 05:46 AM
  4. Help on New Drive Train Advice
    By Mojo Man in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-23-2012, 10:41 AM
  5. Thinking about new drive train...
    By chillRIDE in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-26-2011, 10:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •