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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Cleaning idea...

    So ive been riding my current bike for about the past 2 months, and its had its issues sits its been sitting for quite some time (aka a couple years). So it is in desperate need to be cleaned, and cleaned thoroughly. Since i dont know what the condition of is with all the bearings and other moving parts and i dont know the last time it was ever cleaned VERY good. i figured this would be a good time to tear it down and clean and rebuild it since its hotter then an oven outside and i am unable to be awake at the break of dawn.

    So plan is take everything apart, wash everything very nicely, and for parts that have grease or some kind of lubricant, take that off, clean it, and put fresh grease and or lubricant, inspect all the parts and then assemble it back together...and see if anything needs to be replaced etc

    Is this advisable or should i just hang up my towel and fork out the money for a shop to do it...

  2. #2
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    It's a great idea!
    I do it and have gained a great deal of satisfaction knowing the ins and outs of everything.
    Plus, you know it's done right, or atleast they way YOU want things done.
    If you get stuck, you can always refer back to here for more help.
    It's a bike not a rocketship - so don't feel intimidated - Good Luck!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  3. #3
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    Highdell.. No Emily Batty in AZ threads (sadly ).. what are you doing here! Sound encouragement though!

  4. #4
    Bloodied but Unbowed
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    Be sure to procure a proper torque wrench so you can assemble it to correct specifications.

  5. #5
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    SHNIPE - I like the AZ forum - you guys are fun!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  6. #6
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    So what kind of tips can you guys give me? Any kind of specific order i should go for?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    It's a bike not a rocketship - so don't feel intimidated - Good Luck!

    Attached Images Attached Images  

  8. #8
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    So what kind of tips can you guys give me? Any kind of specific order i should go for?
    Hmmm, that's a good question.

    When doing a deep overhaul all at once, there is no really 'wrong' place to start.
    Personally I spread out the overhaul (nothing wears at the same rate ) - But the entire bike is rebuilt within a year.

    If you can afford to have the bike apart for a WHILE (things will generally take longer for the new wrench), I'd take everything apart, then re install like you'd build a bike.

    Again there may be no 'right' order, but this would be mine...

    Fork/Headset - Check for smooth /fit bearings, and install fork.
    Bottom Bracket - If applicable, pop seals off bearings and clean/grease if necessary
    Rear derailleur - Disassemble jockey wheels, clan and grease bushings/bearings. Clean derailleur, dry, and lube pivots and springs with a dose of Silicone spray. Install jockey wheels.
    Front Derailleur - Same minus the jockey wheels.
    Hubs - If cup cone go HERE. If cartridge bearings, pop dust caps if possible - clean and grease.
    Wheel - Check for tension and true - adjust if necessary. Install wheels.
    Chain - Measure 12 links with a ruler at the pins. it the CtoC distance is over 12 1/16" it time for a new chain. If 12 18"+ - probably tome for a new cassette as well.
    If fine, Clean, DRY, and lube - at this point my chain would've been sat in a bath of bar oil over night, allowed to drip-dry, and wiped down w/ a rag as possible.
    If re install old chain w/ a 'quick-link', baying attention to threading the derailleur. If it's a new chain, wrap the chain around the largest cog and largest chain ring add one full link (two half-links) while accounting for 'quick-link'.
    Pedals - (this step would've been done along with the BB step, but I'd be installing them now...) If they are cup and cone variety, refer to the hub rebuild page - it's the same method. If they're cartridge bearings, remove dustcaps and clean/grease if possible. Grease the pedal threads, and install into crank.
    Cables - Check for wear - if worn - get new. If good, clean and lube w/ silicone spray..
    Brakes - if rim brakes, clean rim-strip w/ alcohol, brake pads can be scuffed and or cleaned with carb-cleaner to remove any glazing.
    If they're discs, clean the rotors w/ alcohol and check the pads. Replace if necessary.
    Lube lever pivot with silicone and install cable, tension with the barrel adjuster cheated 'IN' to account for 'cable-stretch' and more precisely housing/fitting compression.
    Shifters - check for free operation. If sticky, trigger/paddle shifters can sometimes benefit from a shot of WD40 to soften hardened grease inside. Install cable (barrel adj. cheated in) and tension the cable (rear park tools for derailleur adjustments)

    Double-check your work and give it a short shakedown run and adjust as necessary.

    If you're needing the bike to ride, and don't have the time for a full tear-down, I'd generally reverse the order - but BRAKES FIRST

    I hope I helped a bit.
    Good luck!
    Last edited by highdelll; 06-26-2011 at 01:28 PM.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  9. #9
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    OH! I almost forgot, SteveUK (a member here) did a great write up for bike maintenance on his blog and I think it got stickied in the Beginners forum.

    Found it
    Check it Out!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  10. #10
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    be grateful this isn't a place where the time spent cleaning it can be longer than your actual ride.

  11. #11
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    Great options listed above!

    Some things to think about. You will need some special tools. The cost to buy them will run you two-three times the cost of an overhaul at a shop if you use quality tools. You could also borrow them from users here (but not mine- I am not a loaner, but I will help you do the work). As DC mentioned, a decnet torque wrench can save you many headaches and breaks, and they aren't the cheapest.

    A shop overhual, for labor and assuming no parts are needed will run from $50-75 depending on where you go. This might be a great option for the "initial" tune so that a professional eye can look and see what is worn, broken or ready to go south. However, if you are handy with the tools, there are many resources spread across all manner of media (books, YouTube, here, blogs, etc) that can help you along or out of a jam. I am pretty lax on full maintenance. I only clean the drivetrain and discs/pads regularly. The rest I just fix as needed.
    Find a ride on FB> AZ MTB

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  12. #12
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    ^^^ Whereas, I'm more of a PM type of guy - I like to fix stuff before it breaks - I bet I save $$ in the long-haul, but your time is also worth $, so I can see the argument for either side.

    But knowing the inside and out and/or PM of your bike could mean the difference of a quick trail-side fix, or a long walk out.

    My $.02
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    OH! I almost forgot, SteveUK (a member here) did a great write up for bike maintenance on his blog and I think it got stickied in the Beginners forum.

    Found it
    Check it Out!
    Thank a ton Highdell, i used the search button but it didnt come up with much...weird.

    Anyway this helps a ton! exactly what i needed

    Quote Originally Posted by cstem View Post
    Great options listed above!

    Some things to think about. You will need some special tools. The cost to buy them will run you two-three times the cost of an overhaul at a shop if you use quality tools. You could also borrow them from users here (but not mine- I am not a loaner, but I will help you do the work). As DC mentioned, a decnet torque wrench can save you many headaches and breaks, and they aren't the cheapest.

    A shop overhual, for labor and assuming no parts are needed will run from $50-75 depending on where you go. This might be a great option for the "initial" tune so that a professional eye can look and see what is worn, broken or ready to go south. However, if you are handy with the tools, there are many resources spread across all manner of media (books, YouTube, here, blogs, etc) that can help you along or out of a jam. I am pretty lax on full maintenance. I only clean the drivetrain and discs/pads regularly. The rest I just fix as needed.
    You bring up a very good point...i have very limited tools that are related to bikes but plenty for cars and what not. So i do have a good torque wrench

    And i totally agree with you on the initial tear down at a LBS...only issue is im a poor college kid and can barely pay for gas let alone fork out $XXX.XX of money for them to tear down and recommend new parts....one thing that really scares me, is them trying to play my ignorance and overcharge me for parts...example like a $20 shifter cable that they didnt even put on...I just dont want to get raped sideways because oh hey, he's a new guy lets squeeze him for every dollar...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tankerblade View Post
    And i totally agree with you on the initial tear down at a LBS...only issue is im a poor college kid and can barely pay for gas let alone fork out $XXX.XX of money for them to tear down and recommend new parts....one thing that really scares me, is them trying to play my ignorance and overcharge me for parts...example like a $20 shifter cable that they didnt even put on...I just dont want to get raped sideways because oh hey, he's a new guy lets squeeze him for every dollar...
    This is exactly why I support one GOOD LBS. The shop I take my bike to for just about everything knows who I am, and I know them. When you develop a relationship with a good shop, they'll be kind because they know that you will spend what little money you have with them. Some will even let their techs show you how to fix your own bike once they get to know you. Also, just like car repair, when they say something needs to be replaced, most are willing to show you how the part should be compared to how it is...you just need to ask.

    Props to you for tearing your bike down. Hope the re-build goes smooth. I'd like to hear from you when it's all back together as I'm thinking of tearing mine down for a new paint job. Good luck!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tankerblade View Post

    You bring up a very good point...i have very limited tools that are related to bikes but plenty for cars and what not. So i do have a good torque wrench
    Good for you wanting to learn to do this yourself. As for the tools, I am sure there are plenty of guys and gals here that would be willing to give you a hand, myself included. I've got a pretty hectic schedule, but you can shoot me a PM if you want and we can try to find a time to get together.

  16. #16
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    Thanks textbook...i might take you up on that.

    So i started to get into it, took off the rear wheel, cleaned the rear arms, cleaned the rear shock, and the rest of the frame as much as where my thick hands and a rag could fit...

    But i couldnt get the crank, lower rear arm, and the lower shock mounts off...i dont think i have the right tools for that..

    So any advice for taking apart the brakes and derailers?? I heard setting up derailers after replacing a cable can be a big PIA...

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