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  1. #1
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    Best Place to Live and Ride?

    I am thinking of moving to Arizona. Where is the best place for a Mountain Biker to live in Arizona?

  2. #2
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    I see this is your first post on mtbr. Hmm. Maybe you should put a little more effort in asking a meaningfull question. Or not.

  3. #3
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    This place is brutal on the first post. Not sure why.

    Arizona has several great mountain bike towns, each with their own pros and cons. Flagstaff and Sedona probably stand out as the most well known mountain bike towns. Prescott is making progress towards getting right up there with those towns - give it another 5 years or so and it will be pretty amazing. I can't speak to Phoenix or Tucson, but here in Prescott, I can ride the trails close to 350 days a year with only a few weeks snowed out, and only a handful of days too hot to ride even mid day. I can also access hundreds of miles of trails and service roads from my front door without having to ever load my bike on the car. Pretty primo for me, but lots of others love their towns too.

    And with that...here come the flames.

  4. #4
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    It gets too hot for you to ride in Prescott? I can ride here in PHX 365 days a year....




  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    It gets too hot for you to ride in Prescott? I can ride here in PHX 365 days a year....
    Never too hot. I prefer not to ride mid day in the summer, but some do. It seldom reaches 90 up here. I'd say that most of my rides year round are between 45 and 75 degrees from the dead of winter to heat of summer. We do lose a few days to snow, but in most winters it's a nice change and usually does great things to heal the trails. This year has been a bit unusual as we've been forced off the trails for probably 3-4 weeks, but this is not the case in most years.

  6. #6
    My other ride is your mom
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    just giving you a bit of guff.....mid 90's feels pretty good to us lowlanders in the middle of August...it's almost like AC when you're riding along...




  7. #7
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    whoops - double post

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    It gets too hot for you to ride in Prescott? I can ride here in PHX 365 days a year....
    Well yeah, but if you can ride Phoenix 365, you can ride anywhere 365, it's simply dedication. Alaska, Antartica, Greenland, the Sahara, are all "year round riding" if you can deal with 115 heat in Phoenix. It's just a matter of dedication then.


    And yeah, this year has been pretty big for precip (El Nino). Luckily Sedona is closeby, so most weekends I've been riding in Sedona. We also have the Dells area that is the first to clear out (and ridable with some snow anyway), so it's a good alternative. If you know where to ride, Granite Basin is also amongst the first places to clear out after snow, although I've done some real fun snow-rides there.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  9. #9
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    Depends what type of riding you prefer. XC? Chunky trail? Shuttle? Prescott is probably the best for year around fun XC riding from your house. Flagstaff is great XC, chunky trail and DH, just snowed in trails for a few months. Tucson has good desert riding and Mt Lemmon for summer riding. Phoenix has lots of desert riding and year around riding if you have lights or are an early riser.

    I live in phoenix and love the riding here, but vacation in Prescott during the summer.

    Good luck.

    Bob

  10. #10
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    The Tucson/Mt Lemmon combo provides miles and miles of perfect desert riding in the
    colder months, and miles and miles of awesome, cool mountain-top riding in the hotter
    summer months.

    None of the aforementioned locations can make that claim. Sedona comes close, but is at
    least 10 degrees colder in the winter. Check out

    http://www.city-data.com/city/Sedona-Arizona.html and scroll down to the graphs of temps.

    Now, check out http://www.city-data.com/city/Tucson-Arizona.html and scroll down to the
    graphs of temps.

    Sedona is more humid, gets 2 to 3 times the precipitation, and has 20 times the snowfall
    when compared to Tucson.

    In Sedona, the only escape from the heat/humidity in the summer is a run up to Flag
    (which is awesome for heat-of-summer escapes).

    Using the website I have referenced, look up the stats on the other cities.

    (Brace youself for a backlash of jealousy, but these stats I did not make up! )
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  11. #11
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    Phoenix area has the best canals.

  12. #12
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    do your homework first,, visit a few times for yourself. That's what im in the process of doing.
    i'm sure mountain biking can't be the only factor for your decision to move. you dont want to be too remote, yet you probably dont to be downtown either. If its job related, you want to make sure you're not going to be dealing with a ***** of a daily commute [/self employed smugness]

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick

    Sedona is more humid, gets 2 to 3 times the precipitation, and has 20 times the snowfall
    when compared to Tucson.
    20 times .1 is only 2, Sedona has maybe had 2" of snow on the ground, max, because it simply doesn't snow much there. They have had wet stuff, but not anywhere near as much as us in Prescott. I'm not sure how much I trust that data, since Sedona doesn't get squat for snow.

    Tucson does get hit by the monsoon weather more than Sedona. The weather starts in the southeast corner of the state, so you get higher humidity there earlier than it hits Sedona, as well as thunderstorms of course.

    I have been to the top of Mt Lemmon, and while that is nice, the elevation isn't all that high. You can "escape" the hotter temps, but the actual amount of land above say 8000' is pretty small. I think the high-altitude riding there is pretty isolated, and you have to go a long way to find another sky-island which once again has a bit of riding above 8000'. With places like Flag and Williams, the riding starts at 7000' and goes up from there. We have a fair amount of riding in Prescott above 7000' as well, (West Spruce, Spruce Mtn, Mt Union, Mt Francis, Mingus).


    I do think we have the best of both worlds here in Prescott, but that is my biased opinion. I live in PV and can make a Sedona-run in about 45 minutes now, and in the summer time Flagstaff and Williams aren't that far away, although I usually ride mostly around Prescott due to the vertical terrain. We have rides where you can simply rack up lots of vertical, 5000' or more. There are hundreds of miles of trails, and at least now we might start to get some more technical trails built. There are a few around here, but not many, which is why I go to Flagstaff or Phoenix in the summer. We do have many miles of trails though, and I like to "mix it up" in terms of what I ride here in Prescott. You don't need AC much, and you don't need heat all that much either, except a bit during some of the mornings. It does get a bit chilly in the winter during the mornings or a cold-front, but the ample sun makes it feel quite a bit warmer (whereas the sun and rock in Sedona makes it feel even warmer, on par with areas of Phoenix even during the summer). We have all sorts of "big-city" ammenites these days, but forest surrounding Prescott on 3 sides and some decent back-country where you can escape anything related to a city.


    If anyone wants to know what kind of riding options exist around Prescott, check this out:
    http://www.sharlot.org/archives/maps/trailmaps/
    click on any of the "quadrants" around Prescott.
    Last edited by Jayem; 03-03-2010 at 08:40 AM.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I'm not sure how much I trust that data, since Sedona doesn't get squat for snow.
    "I'm not sure how much I trust that data, since"...trusting it would mean admitting that the
    points Patrick made are all valid.



    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I have been to the top of Mt Lemmon, and while that is nice, the elevation isn't all that high.
    9,157 feet above sea-level. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Lemmon

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    You can "escape" the hotter temps, but the actual amount of land above say 8000' is pretty small. I think the high-altitude riding there is pretty isolated, and you have to go a long way to find another sky-island which once again has a bit of riding above 8000'.

    [EDIT]
    9,157 puts a heck of a lot of riding above 8000 ft. Like, 1,157 ft.

    To put this into perspective, the elevation gain of South Mountain is about 1,310 feet. There's
    a heck of a lot of riding in those 1310 feet. Do you suppose there could also be a heck of
    a lot of riding in the 1,157 ft you've dismissed? Trails like Butterfly, Crystal Spring, 1918,
    Secret, Sunset, Aspen Draw, etc? No, not nearly as much high riding as Flagstaff.


    [/EDIT]
    You should stop down and do some of these "small" rides with me some time. I can whip
    together several routes above 8000 ft that will take 3 to 4 hours at an agressive pace.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I do think we have the best of both worlds here in Prescott.
    Even the Prescott locals have publically admitted that the trails are a bit too buff and lack
    the tech riding found in many other areas. If you'd like, I can do some searching here on
    MTBR for those statements. Chances are, you're one of the ones I can quote.
    Last edited by Evil Patrick; 03-03-2010 at 09:26 AM.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayWalker
    I am thinking of moving to Arizona. Where is the best place for a Mountain Biker to live in Arizona?
    Ooops. I looked at your profile and you are a DHer. That may limit your search.

    That probably rules out Prescott for a DH leaning rider. Gonna get a SS?

    The best I can think of for you (DH rider) would be to live near South Mountain in PHX where the are regular weekend and Wednesday morning shuttles. There is also a "good" group of DHers that regularly travel to Bootleg for DH races. That would get you the most regular (weekly) DH riding in the state as far as I know.

    Note to others, I didn't say that was the best for everyone, just a DH rider.

    Jayem, please ring in with Prescott area DH opportunities. Perhaps there are regular shuttles on Mt Lemmon too.

    Bob

    PS It might be hard to go wrong with choosing Prescott, Phoenix, Tucson, Flagstaff or Sedona relative to other areas of the country...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    "I'm not sure how much I trust that data, since"...trusting it would mean admitting that the
    points Patrick made are all valid.

    The only times it "snows" in Sedona it doesn't result in any accumulation, so like I said, 20 times .1 is only 2, they don't get squat for snow. I KNOW the monsoonal weather patterns, so I don't have to look at some subjective data to prove it. It will often be clear in Sedona and Prescott when it's storming down near Tucson, that's just the way it is.
    9,157 feet above sea-level. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Lemmon

    9,157 puts a heck of a lot of riding above 8000 ft. Butterfly, Crystal Spring, 1918, Secret,
    Sunset, Aspen Draw, etc. No, not nearly as much high riding as Flagstaff.
    Yep, and like I said, there is far more high-altitude riding (land simply at higher altitude) around Flag, Prescott, etc. You can ride up above 9K on the Mt Elden side, the Schultz-Pass side, Snowbowl side, Inner-Basin side, Williams, etc.

    Even the Prescott locals have publically admitted that the trails are a bit too buff and lack
    the tech riding found in many other areas. If you'd like, I can do some searching here on
    MTBR for those statements. Chances are, you're one of the ones I can quote.
    But, we have the Dells now, which is all technical, and we have the PMBA that is going to push for more technical trails with the support of the IMBA. Flagstaff and Sedona aren't all that far away, but there are a few fun trails in Prescott that have some technical stuff, 40, 345, 126, 48, etc. Not in spades, but it's there, and on a big ride you can experience a lot of variety. I've pointed this out many times, so feel free to quote me. What I notice more than anything is that Prescott locals seem to stick to certain trails and routes and don't get out of Prescott very often, so I do a far wider range of trails up here than most of them, even though we can still use more technical riding.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  17. #17
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    There are a few places you can shuttle around town. Whether it's worth it is up to the rider, you can ride down Spruce Mountain, Mt Francis, and a few others, and it's mostly downhill.

    Nearby, we have Mingus Mountain, which is better. It's still not up to the level of anything in Flag, but it has more technical and more downhill, plus a monster 4000' vert descent on the East side. Then of course Flagstaff isn't all that far away (and Phoenix in the winter). That's the benefit, you're smack-dab in the middle, which offers good options at all times.

    Things should be getting better with the PMBA though. Hopefully we'll have some true DH stuff sometime soon. Till then, you got to earn the descents for the most part, but there are some good ones.

    I live for the DH stuff, but I wouldn't want to live in Flag (too snowy and cold for too long) or Phoenix (too hot/congested/bad air quality, etc) or Tucson (too isolated and still damn hot at city-level). I'd rather have a place that I like to ride most of the time, and fill in the edges with the other places.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    The only times it "snows" in Sedona it doesn't result in any accumulation, so like I said, 20 times .1 is only 2, they don't get squat for snow.
    According to the stats (that probably are not fabricated), Sedona gets between about 16.5
    and 20.5 inches of snow between the months of late december and mid-March. These are
    most likely from years and years of data.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    But, we have the Dells now, which is all technical,
    And how many miles is that section?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    and we have the PMBA that is going to push for more technical trails with the support of the IMBA.
    But to date, there is nothing hear but imagination and good intentions. Hardly a reason to
    jump at moving there.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    Ooops. I looked at your profile and you are a DHer. That may limit your search.

    PS It might be hard to go wrong with choosing Prescott, Phoenix, Tucson, Flagstaff or Sedona relative to other areas of the country...
    Thanks for all the feedback. My bad for not updating my profile. I just consider myself a trail rider. I do ride DH up at Whistler, but I live in the Seattle Area and am used to very technical single track. I don't mind pedaling. I am just excited to be able to ride in the dead of winter, under the sun. I am not concerned with finding DH riding in Arizona. I will go to Whistler for that.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike
    do your homework first,, visit a few times for yourself. That's what im in the process of doing.
    i'm sure mountain biking can't be the only factor for your decision to move. you dont want to be too remote, yet you probably dont to be downtown either. If its job related, you want to make sure you're not going to be dealing with a ***** of a daily commute [/self employed smugness]
    Good Suggestion, I will be visiting. I work virtually from Seattle. My decision is based on a few factors. I am young and have nothing holding me back. The cost of living (real estate market), and lastly the weather in Seattle sucks in the winter.

    All I need is an internet connection, cell service, and a good trail that keeps me amped to ride every day.

  21. #21
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    DW if you can make it down around for 8 days of xmas rides you will get a very good taste of what Tucson has to offer. 8 Days Of Xmas rides tucson

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    According to the stats (that probably are not fabricated), Sedona gets between about 16.5
    and 20.5 inches of snow between the months of late december and mid-March. These are
    most likely from years and years of data.
    No, it doesn't. It gets about zero inches of snow. I'm not sure there's even been snow on the ground in Sedona this year, and if there was, it only lasted a couple hours. It might be in terms of "precip", but claiming that Sedona gets "snow" is kind of ridiculous. For all intents and purposes, Sedona is not in the "snow belt". It's not quite as rare as say North Phoenix or Tucson, but it's close. If you really think beyond the numbers you are giving, you'll realize that it can't accumulate with those kinds of numbers, it would have to snow 16.5" at once, and even then it would only last a few days. If that 16.5 is spread out over a long period of time, it never accumulates, never "covers" the ground, and for all intents and purposes, it's not a place that gets "snow" in my book.

    And how many miles is that section?
    I think total if you go out and back and take all the spurrs would be about 10 miles (not considering the miles in between), considering both trails, but the plan is to have downhill trails off of Glassford Hill tie in, making for a pretty neat technical/downhill destination/area.


    But to date, there is nothing hear but imagination and good intentions. Hardly a reason to
    jump at moving there.
    Yeah, wow, 2 months later, imagine that. But, you are completely wrong, there is a fundraiser this month for the PMBA, and it is starting to move. Now, it doesn't mean things will happen right away, but we DO have some technical routes already, and things have only been getting better in the last few years as far as more trails and connections to trails.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayWalker
    Good Suggestion, I will be visiting. I work virtually from Seattle. My decision is based on a few factors. I am young and have nothing holding me back. The cost of living (real estate market), and lastly the weather in Seattle sucks in the winter.

    All I need is an internet connection, cell service, and a good trail that keeps me amped to ride every day.
    Here's an idea. We are doing this thing called AZ Spring Fling down here. It starts next week. March 10-14. We ride in Tucson, Phoenix, Sedona, Prescott. All guided, all free. Jump on a plane and come down. See what you like, and don't like.
    ~Aaron~
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    ...it's not a place that gets "snow" in my book.
    And where can we buy this book? I'm sure it's facinating in all respects.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I think total if you go out and back and take all the spurrs would be about 10 miles.
    That's a heck of a lot of miles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Yeah, wow, 2 months later, imagine that. But, you are completely wrong,
    I'm completely wrong?!?



    Throw together that 10 mile Easter-egg hunt of a tech-fest and all of those imaginary
    miles of additional trail and soon everyone will be jonesing to ride the super-loop in your
    book.



    Have you ever been wrong about something?
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggnarl
    I see this is your first post on mtbr. Hmm. Maybe you should put a little more effort in asking a meaningfull question. Or not.
    TOOL

  26. #26
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    -- Evil Patrick

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  27. #27
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    DayWalker-

    You can't go wrong with any of the aforementioned Arizona towns.

    I think Prescott is rad and we're working to make it even better. Stay tuned. In the meantime, if you visit Arizona and put Prescott on your itinerary, send me a PM and we'll put together a week of good times and good rides for ya.

    Peace-

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    Quote Originally Posted by MyBike'sBroken
    Here's an idea. We are doing this thing called AZ Spring Fling down here. It starts next week. March 10-14. We ride in Tucson, Phoenix, Sedona, Prescott. All guided, all free. Jump on a plane and come down. See what you like, and don't like.
    Darn! That is a bad weekend for me. Who is "We?" Is there a group I can hook up with when I am down there next?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by DayWalker
    Darn! That is a bad weekend for me. Who is "We?" Is there a group I can hook up with when I am down there next?
    You can read all about AZ Spring Fling on here. Just read the posts that have the topic "AZSF" in them.

    If you can't come down then, just post up here when you are coming down. I'm sure you will get some people to show you around.
    ~Aaron~
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  30. #30
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    I guess you're not going to show him around?

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    I just moved back from NorCal (I'm working remotely too) I have family in Phoenix and my wife is from here so that pretty much influenced my decision. If you're free from the binds of family I would do something in the higher country (Prescott, Sedona, Flaggstaff, etc...) and then drive down in the winter. If money is no object get a condo down here in PHX and something up in Prescott or near Sedona. Then you can have the best of both worlds.

    Personally I think the trails in Phoenix are just amazing, the variety can't be beat. I would say they are better then a lot of the stuff up in NorCal (with a few exceptions). You can do just about every type of riding here, from easy XC to techy FR. Hell even the road ride up to the top of South Mountain is kind of fun. And if you get sick of riding in PHX you can travel 2.5 hours north or south to a whole slue of world class trails.

    My buddies back in NorCal ask me why I haven't ridden my road bike since I moved back. It's because the trails here are so awesome I can't seem to get motivated to ride on the road, especially since most of the road rides are near some of the best trails.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    20 times .1 is only 2, Sedona has maybe had 2" of snow on the ground, max, because it simply doesn't snow much there. They have had wet stuff, but not anywhere near as much as us in Prescott. I'm not sure how much I trust that data, since Sedona doesn't get squat for snow.

    Tucson does get hit by the monsoon weather more than Sedona. The weather starts in the southeast corner of the state, so you get higher humidity there earlier than it hits Sedona, as well as thunderstorms of course.

    I have been to the top of Mt Lemmon, and while that is nice, the elevation isn't all that high. You can "escape" the hotter temps, but the actual amount of land above say 8000' is pretty small. I think the high-altitude riding there is pretty isolated, and you have to go a long way to find another sky-island which once again has a bit of riding above 8000'. With places like Flag and Williams, the riding starts at 7000' and goes up from there. We have a fair amount of riding in Prescott above 7000' as well, (West Spruce, Spruce Mtn, Mt Union, Mt Francis, Mingus).


    I do think we have the best of both worlds here in Prescott, but that is my biased opinion. I live in PV and can make a Sedona-run in about 45 minutes now, and in the summer time Flagstaff and Williams aren't that far away, although I usually ride mostly around Prescott due to the vertical terrain. We have rides where you can simply rack up lots of vertical, 5000' or more. There are hundreds of miles of trails, and at least now we might start to get some more technical trails built. There are a few around here, but not many, which is why I go to Flagstaff or Phoenix in the summer. We do have many miles of trails though, and I like to "mix it up" in terms of what I ride here in Prescott. You don't need AC much, and you don't need heat all that much either, except a bit during some of the mornings. It does get a bit chilly in the winter during the mornings or a cold-front, but the ample sun makes it feel quite a bit warmer (whereas the sun and rock in Sedona makes it feel even warmer, on par with areas of Phoenix even during the summer). We have all sorts of "big-city" ammenites these days, but forest surrounding Prescott on 3 sides and some decent back-country where you can escape anything related to a city.


    If anyone wants to know what kind of riding options exist around Prescott, check this out:
    http://www.sharlot.org/archives/maps/trailmaps/
    click on any of the "quadrants" around Prescott.
    I'll take Sedona/Phoenix/Tucson anyday for mountain biking goodness over Kansas City.. Winter riding is few and far between for the most part, at least for me that is, because of our lovely freeze/thaw monster and my work shift which keeps me out of the loop for when the trails are frozen.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  33. #33
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    Aside from weather, which I have to think Prescott might be the winner, the other consideration is the vibe of the riding scene. I can't speak to Flag, Sedona, Tucson or Phoenix, but the ride scene in Prescott is super casual with great energy. We don't have the in-fighting other towns have. We definitely do not have the crowds. Even on a super busy weekend, it's very rare to bump into more than a couple other riders, and when you do, chances are you know them by first name. If you want to ride a lonely trail, you can. If you want to saddle up with 50 of your friends on a group ride, we have that too.

    Another unique thing to Prescott, is the current explosion of support for mountain biking. We currently have the support of IMBA, the riding community, the local national forest, event promoters, local businesses, and we even had members of city council and the mayor at a recent mountain bike planning meeting. The potential in Prescott is off the charts. If there's something you want from the Prescott riding scene, it's just a matter of pitching in to make it happen.

    This isn't to say Prescott is the beat all, but it's pretty awesome.

  34. #34
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    Buy a small RV. Get a high-speed sat link. Drive from town to town. Ride when and
    where you want. Prescott for a month. Sedona for a month. Flag for a month. Tucson for
    a month. PHX for a month. Globe for a month. Take plenty of pictures and post them here.
    Make us all jealous!
    -- Evil Patrick

    Some of my Music

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    The trail...shall set you free.

  35. #35
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    Prescott has the overall advantage for riding. Why? Riding convenience/accessibility, and central location within the state.

    If the goal is to ride often (and when isn’t it?), riding Prescott really allows this. If you live in virtually any part of Prescott, you can RIDE to get to any trail, which then links you to pretty much ALL the trails. That’s not to say there’s not much to ride. There’s more than enough miles that always makes for good riding in my opinion.

    Again, you can ride to all the trails. That’s the real advantage Prescott haves. Example: If you suddenly find yourself with some free time before school or after work, it’s simply a matter of gearing up and riding out your front door. No driving across town for an hour each way. One can ride to 326 which links to 332 over to north-Granite mountain area 347, 345 etc, cross over to Legacy to the Dells and the Peavine, or the same 326 south to 393, 48 etc. One can ride to 396 which links to 307, and 305 etc. That translates to riding convenience on short notice. Just ride to your closest trailhead, point in the direction that interest you that day, and enjoy.

    If you want to mix it up without driving five hours, Prescott’s central location gives you the option to either go north to Sedona, Flagstaff, Grand Canyon/Williams, south to black canyon trail, South Mountain park and the other Phoenix area desert trails and parks, or east to Show Low. All fairly easy drives from Prescott.

    Now if we could just get a decent Motocross track here. . but that's a different story.

    jeff

  36. #36
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    I think you should definitely visit several time, at different times of the year before you decide. Since you are from a more northern place, unless you have lived somewhere hot before, the heat will shock you. I am from Mi, and everyone told me that it feels so much cooler out here because there is no humidity. They are right about the humidity, but the sun is so hot, most of the year, it feels like I have a heat lamp hanging a few inches from my head. Northern Az, like Prescott and Flagstaff are very nice, I really like both towns, and the weather in both are pretty nice, but just remember 70 here feels like 80 that you are used to, if you are in the sun at least. As for the trails, I am fairly new to the MTBing and still kinda new to the area, but I like the fact that Prescott has mostly smooth single track.

  37. #37
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    Reputation: Velokid1's Avatar
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    I disagree... in Prescott, 90 in the sun feels like 80 in the humidity back east. 90 in the shade feels like 70 back east. The key is Pines and shade baby.

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