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  1. #1
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    Arizona Specific Tires

    I know this is probably going to conjure up a million different opinions and disagreements, but I gotta ask...
    What kind of tires does everyone run for our AZ terrain, and what are the best?
    I'm talking rocky PMP type stuff AND the loose gravel at MMP or Cave Creek Rec area.
    I'm currently running tubes, so that might make a difference.
    Thanks for the input!

  2. #2
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    Love my Specialize captains. Seem great on "everythign"

  3. #3
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    Wide

  4. #4
    Alive and Lurkin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by h2ojunkie
    Wide
    ++1
    Pumpin & Pimpin

  5. #5
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    For X-country: As recommended above, specialize captains are good, but subject to sidewall cuts (from rocks) on the rear due to more rider weight. A good, fast tire for the rear that doesn't seem to mind desert abuse is the Hutchinson python light. I use specialize captain control on front and Hutchinson python light on rear (running UST though), Pythons work great, but do wear out rather quickly. I run them until almost bald without issues.

  6. #6
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    I'm really loving my new Intense 909 tire on the front. Super tough sidewalls and sticky tread.

    I can't believe what I'm seeing at Jensen, I just got this tire for $50 at my LBS. Must be a misprint or something. Check out the prices!


  7. #7
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    I have some Continental Trail King 2.4 that are awesome...Dominics has them for $26...cant beat em...

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the info!
    Zuk- At first I just looked at the photo and thought, "For $530, those tires better carry me up the hill and make me breakfast!"

  9. #9
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    I'm running Weirwolf 2.3 TCS, tubeless w/motorcycle stems and 4 ounces Stan's Sealant in each tire. I was running 2.1 Weirwolf's since around January until now, and I have never had a flat yet. The 2.3 is allot better in deep sand, very happy with the WTB line of tires. Opened the tires after running them 8 months, and had a huge Stan's booger in each tire. The 2.3 Weirwolf tires are kind of spendy, about $60 dollars each.

  10. #10
    Wait, what!?
    Reputation: Enduroblood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillwilly
    I'm running Weirwolf 2.3 TCS, tubeless w/motorcycle stems and 4 ounces Stan's Sealant in each tire. I was running 2.1 Weirwolf's since around January until now, and I have never had a flat yet. The 2.3 is allot better in deep sand, very happy with the WTB line of tires. Opened the tires after running them 8 months, and had a huge Stan's booger in each tire. The 2.3 Weirwolf tires are kind of spendy, about $60 dollars each.
    I have always been curious about those Weirwolfs. Pretty wide tread that looks like it would be super grabby on rocks and corners, yea? A few of my buddies have ran them but have never stuck with them. They look to be a little too soft in that they wear down pretty quick. Any truth to that?

    I really like my Specialized Eskars for what its worth. I believe they have been replaced though, with the Purgs.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillwilly
    I'm running Weirwolf 2.3 TCS, tubeless w/motorcycle stems and 4 ounces Stan's Sealant in each tire. The 2.3 Weirwolf tires are kind of spendy, about $60 dollars each.
    I put a 2.1 Weirwolf on my front and love it so far. But, admittedly, I'm probably not good enough at riding to know any difference. I did buy a pair of 2.3s from Chainlove for $15 each so when my current set of tires are eaten up I'll go tubeless with the brand new tires.

    departmentofgoods.com still has 2.5 Weirwolf Race tires for $35. Don't know what the different flavors really mean, though: race, comp, downhill...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike
    I put a 2.1 Weirwolf on my front and love it so far. But, admittedly, I'm probably not good enough at riding to know any difference. I did buy a pair of 2.3s from Chainlove for $15 each so when my current set of tires are eaten up I'll go tubeless with the brand new tires.

    departmentofgoods.com still has 2.5 Weirwolf Race tires for $35. Don't know what the different flavors really mean, though: race, comp, downhill...
    Dang, I wish they had 24 inch ones. I'd buy one right now. Still looking...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazooka_beard
    I know this is probably going to conjure up a million different opinions and disagreements, but I gotta ask...
    What kind of tires does everyone run for our AZ terrain, and what are the best?
    I'm talking rocky PMP type stuff AND the loose gravel at MMP or Cave Creek Rec area.
    I'm currently running tubes, so that might make a difference.
    Thanks for the input!
    Round ones...
    Rarely adds anything productive to threads

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by zukicidal
    I'm really loving my new Intense 909 tire on the front. Super tough sidewalls and sticky tread.

    I can't believe what I'm seeing at Jensen, I just got this tire for $50 at my LBS. Must be a misprint or something. Check out the prices!

    Must be the ones with the gold belts.
    Rarely adds anything productive to threads

  15. #15
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    Just going to pop in a little dirty, science, info found in the really boring parts of discussions/blogs/scientific findings of tire technology-some from motorcycles here (which I learned as a racing tire distributor.)

    For starters, until one is confident on thier bike (whether new to the bike or new to riding) changing up tires or wondering what is best isn't really important yet. Save up the money for a good tune up or spring for some bling. Once you know how your bike and your particular riding style dictate the lines you are taking and how well you ride- then it is time to experiement, seek advice and learn some lessons. I am assuming you are already there as are most posters in this forum- thats just something I pass on to new folks I help into the sport.

    Hard terrain dictates hard knobs for best traction. Sound backwards? To many it does. People always think soft tires for more grip, just like on race cars and road bikes. Makes sense since our hardpack out here is nearly hard as pavement. But a soft knob rolls as force is applied to it. This roll on cement will roll to the edge until it breaks traction causing a squirm- NASCAR tires are smooth. No knob roll. Knob roll on loose stuff over hard means rolling off traction just when you are diggin for traction. A hard knob works best for the trails you describe and will work good pretty much anywhere for me.

    Tall knobs dig into the looser stuff better and some even say they claw onto rocks. The gravity set likes them because they do lots of hard braking on crappy trail (loose rock,sand, silt). Short knobs are great too as they grip nicely on hard terrain, are decent in shallow loose stuff and have less rolling resistance on flat terrain. They are lighter too due to having less rubber which matters on long climbs and short bursts of power.
    Technique plays huge into tire choice, bike style too. Body weight, running tubeless or not (not even getting into which is better because doing anything to tires besides riding on them sucks- whether its changing tubes or dealing with goo!) rim style makes a difference in tire choice as well. Follow some folks around who ride like you do and try what they run. Thats how I made my choice and I am hooked on Maxxis low knob tires like the Larsen TT Crossmark. I have a Bontrager on the front that I was going to replace when worn, but it still sticks after about 500 miles, so its still there. My turning technique allows me to run a knobbier tire unless I "blow" the line then its a handful.

    I really geek out on tire talk- sorry for the long post!
    Find a ride on FB> AZ MTB

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstem
    For starters, until one is confident on thier bike (whether new to the bike or new to riding) changing up tires or wondering what is best isn't really important yet. Save up the money for a good tune up or spring for some bling. Once you know how your bike and your particular riding style dictate the lines you are taking and how well you ride- then it is time to experiement, seek advice and learn some lessons. I am assuming you are already there as are most posters in this forum- thats just something I pass on to new folks I help into the sport.
    Thanks for the info! I feel I have just gotten to the point you speak of, to where I know my riding style and my machine. The guys at the LBS i go to recommended a small knob tire, the Bontrager XR1's (http://bontrager.com/model/07798), so I picked up one for the rear. I gotta say, after a few months of riding on it, I'm not really sold. I was out at MMP today and it was slipping out on a lot of the loose climbs. I never felt very confident in turns either. maybe a bigger knob is the way to go.

  17. #17
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    i've had great luck running these on my 4" travel 26"....i run 'em with slimed tubes.

    kenda nevegal in the front 2.35 ~38 psi
    kenda small block on the back 2.35 ~40 psi

    you would think that the small block wouldn't climb very well, but they are really hard to break loose on the back of a FS bike. they roll really fast, and i also feel like they brake pretty good and are really predicatable. i usually ride about a 15 mile out-n-back from my house to ringtail trailhead (MSP) and the small block eight is only 2 months old and it's almost gone (i'm 225 lbs)...but the 15 miles includes about 3 miles of asphalt.

    i've heard people crab about the sidewalks of the kendas, but I've had really good luck with mine.....i've nailed many, many rocks on the sidewalls and never had a pinch (knock, knock).

    good luck.
    Maah Daah Hey

  18. #18
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    I had around 650 miles of trailriding, on my Weirwolf 2.1's and they still had some tread left on them. They are a soft tire, which work very well in the sand and hardpack, IMO. I like the Kenda Nevegal tires, I would be afraid to run them tubeless with 4 ounces of sealant. If Kenda makes them tubeless compatabile in the future, I would definitely consider running them.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazooka_beard
    Thanks for the info! I feel I have just gotten to the point you speak of, to where I know my riding style and my machine. The guys at the LBS i go to recommended a small knob tire, the Bontrager XR1's (http://bontrager.com/model/07798), so I picked up one for the rear. I gotta say, after a few months of riding on it, I'm not really sold. I was out at MMP today and it was slipping out on a lot of the loose climbs. I never felt very confident in turns either. maybe a bigger knob is the way to go.
    Other factors are tire pressure and sidewall construction. A small knob tire when inflated too much will handle pretty badly everywhere. Expirement and destroy!
    Find a ride on FB> AZ MTB

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  20. #20
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    I ride mostly XC stuff here in the Valley and prefer Kenda Small Block 8's for most everything. They are like Velcro and roll very fast.

    Some other good choices (IMHO):

    Kenda Nevagals
    Kenda Karma
    Maxxis Larsen TT
    Maxxis Aspen
    WTB Nano
    Specialized Capt (front)
    Specialized Fast Track (rear)
    Marty

  21. #21
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    I second the choice of captains on the front and fast tracks on the rear for most xc riding.

  22. #22
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    Anyone want a 24x2.60 Specialized Roller? It's too big for my Big Hit.

  23. #23
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    I second the choice of captains on the front and fast tracks on the rear for most xc riding.

  24. #24
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    Ok another bonehead question. A 26x2.3 or 2.3 will fit on a normal rim, just as a 2.1 would, right? All that really changes is the width of the tread, right? sorry for the noob question.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bazooka_beard
    Ok another bonehead question. A 26x2.3 or 2.3 will fit on a normal rim, just as a 2.1 would, right? All that really changes is the width of the tread, right? sorry for the noob question.
    Yes.

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