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  1. #1
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    Yes it's a shoe thread. Riding/running combo?

    ***I did search, I didn't find a thread with this particular question***

    I rarely buy shoes, so I am lost right now. I am looking for input on a running shoe that would also be useable with platforms. Hell, I could use any input on just a good running shoe for that matter.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  2. #2
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    Running shoes have a soft sole because you want them to flex, but bike shoes are the opposite, you typically get a hard rigid sole so your foot doesn't wrap around the pedal.

    The only potential thing that comes to mind is a hiking shoe, but it's not ideal for either.

    For a running shoe by far your best bet is to go to an actual running store and getting fitted there. I used to get horrible knee pain and shin splints running until I discovered the difference a good store can make in getting you the right equipment.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for distinguishing between the 2. I wasn't sure if there would be any shoe out there useable for both. I'm already using SPD on my bike. I had thoughts about picking up some platforms to swap occassionally, mainly when working on skill building. But I'm not going to buy a new pair of running shoes and platform shoes....

    Unfortunately, at my current location, there isn't a whole lot in the way of good shoes stores to walk in and try on shoes. And right now I have no idea when I'm gonna be back in the states. I know how important it is to try shoes first, rather then just buying online and praying they work. But it looks like for now my best bet is to research and get feedback on different shoes.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  4. #4
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    Most trail running shoes have stiffer soles than road shoes, and might work ok for riding platforms, but they aren't as smooth if you run on the road.

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I got back into running about a year and a half ago after some false starts and problems of one sort or another, and promised myself I'd "get it right." I ended up spending about 75 hours on running workouts last year - not a ton, I'm more interesting in cycling - but more than nothing, at least.

    There are a bunch of different types of running shoes, corresponding to various different gaits people have. If you have really stable ankles, you get neutral shoes. If you pronate some, which is most of us, shoes designed for some extra stability help. There are also shoes for people who pronate a ton and people who do the opposite thing.

    For me, it turns out to be really important to wear shoes designed for extra stability. I was working out in neutral shoes for a while and just not making any progress in terms of how much I could run without pain; the stability shoes have helped a lot. My ankles are a bit flaky, actually a common problem among cyclists, so it's been a little bit of a battle.

    I find that traditional running shoes, particularly stability shoes, actually have fairly good crossover to cycling. The sole is pretty thick and compared to old-school canvas sneakers or some of the new super-light running shoes, it's reasonably stiff, more so with stability shoes. I usually wear running shoes when I ride my commuter, and have done some relatively long rides that way; it was fine. If you're riding on nice, big platform pedals, that helps too. I don't like neutral shoes as much, although it's more that I tend to pronate. (Go figure.)

    I'm not recommending any particular shoe type to you. The point is that there are some families, and it does matter. There are resources on the 'net for helping to figure out shoe type. I think it's about on par with bike sizing via the internet, which is to say better than nothing and not as good as trying some.

    Lately, I'm running in a pair of ASICS. I've also been happy with Nikes and Brooks shoes. I don't think they have a monopoly on "good," that's just the brands I've worn.

    Depending on the surfaces you're running on, running shoes don't always have a great wear life. So it's good to use them just for running, once you find "your" shoe. That's not great for crossover, although running shoes that have lost their resilience are really still fine as a casual shoe, for riding bikes, whatever. Sort of like having good jeans and work jeans.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    Well these running shoes will be primarily used on a track or street, for the purpose of passing my physical fitness test for work. I don't have a problem with my ankles. I had to look up pronate, and I don't think it's reall yan issue for me. My biggest problem resides in my knees. They aren't in horrible shape yet, but they hurt on longer road rides or the month leading up to my fit test as I prepare for it.

    I was hoping to find a shoe that could work for both. But I will just hold off on the dual use search, and concentrate on a specific running shoe. Do you know of any shoes that seem to run sizes small? I know Nike runs small. I wear a 13 usually, but with Nike or Under Armour (especially cleats) I need a 13.5 or 14.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I thought the ASICS and Brooks ran about true-to-size. Reviews on sites like Amazon or running-focused web sites can be great for that.

    Did you do any of the tests, or just assume you don't pronate (or supinate)? It's very common, and while it's not likely to bother most people around walking, it can turn into a problem with running. Although I think a lot of people would be fine in either shoe, assuming they didn't rush into crazy volume right away.

    I had some knee problems in college; if you take care of it, a lot of this stuff can be managed quite well. When I first found out about my knee issue, I was afraid I'd never be able to do a Century. Now, I have, and I can do long mountain bike rides and races, and pretty much everything I've wanted to do. It has taken a little more attention during training, though. Anyway, I'm hoping to be racing until I'm old enough to embarrass my grand children.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    I've been checking reviews on Amazon. I don't even look at a product unless it has a 4+ star average, and then I still pay a lot of attention to the 1 and 2 star reviews on those products.
    My current "running" shoe is a pair of Adidas basketball high tops. Not exactly made for much more then sprints up and down hardwood. Before that was some NB trail running shoes until they wore out beyond use. But when searching for running shoes today, there are so freakin many that it is very overwhelming, which is why I have just continued to run in those shoes the last couple years instead of buying new shoes.
    I didn't do the pronate/supinate tests. I'm not saying I don't, I just think that if I do it must not be that bad. Definitely not as bad as the youtube videos I saw. Though I think you are subtely suggesting I check it out.....
    I have tried to get Dr's to diagnose problems with my knees, but my healthcare (military) is more about throwing 800mg motrin at someone and telling them nothing is wrong, then actually finding the problem.
    Case in point: I had a foot injury that severe pain lasted over 2 months. I went in to the ER twice because I couldn't walk on it (like fell on the floor trying to put weight on it), got x-rays taken 2 different times, had 2 different Dr appointments, and finally got them to do a CAT scan. None of those turned up any problems. But all of those focused on bone issues. Even though I was in a hospital with an MRI machine, they wouldn't do the MRI which might show muscle/tissue/ligament damage. Instead they told me to keep downing naproxen after I told them it did nothing for me. Needles to say I continued to walk it off, and rarely feel pain out of it a year later.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Buy more of the New Balances you liked. If you can't find them on the 'net, chances are good that you'll like their successors. If there's been a name change, Googling the old name can often get you reviews or press releases that will tell you what the new version is called.

    That's not SOP for everyone with buying running shoes, but a lot of runners have "their" shoe and keep getting them NOS until the back stock is all gone. A lot like roadies and tires.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    Thanks again Andrew. You've been quite helpful.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  11. #11
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    I wear Nike Free 5.0 for biking. They are a running shoe with soft soles and are quite flexible. I love how the pins on my pedals sink right into them and give tons of grip, and I also love the flexibility of them. Been wearing them for years and they are still going although quite beat up at this point.

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