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  1. #1
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    What jersey that doesn't look like a jersey?

    I have been wearing t-shirts for my trail rides but was thinking about getting a real jersey...something with good technical fabric. Here is the thing: I don't want it to look too much like a bike jersey. Any suggestions or recommendations?

  2. #2
    El Gato Malo
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    Unless you need the rear pockets, why not get a technical fabric t-shirt?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail6 View Post
    Unless you need the rear pockets, why not get a technical fabric t-shirt?
    Well, I guess I could do that. I carry any stuff I need to in my Camel back. Any recommendations on brand?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by njdj View Post
    . Any recommendations on brand?
    Just go to Walmart or Sports Authority or whever you like to shop and get whatever....Addidas, Nike, no-name, doesn't really matter imo as long as it's moisture wicking (Technical Fabric). If you want a low-key loose fitting bike jersey check out the Fox Baseline. I prefer them over a basic tshirt style wicking shirt b/c they have a long front zipper and it's gets a little hot in central Arizona so I actually make use of it.

  5. #5
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    got a ClubRide shirt for x-mas. pretty cool. I usually ride in a closeout $10 tech tee from adidas or nike you can get from any big box store or outlet type stores.

  6. #6
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    Under armour, nike dri fits, adidas climalite, old navy has a house brand, Target as well. They also come in different weights for cold and warm conditions. Fit also varies from compression, fitted and loose. I personally wear under armour as they have a variety of styles. And because most mtb/cycling jerseys do not fit me. Under armour fits me well, I'm 5'7" and 190lbs (gym rat), Nike and adidas runs long, for me. Hope this helps

  7. #7
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    For something inexpensive, I like the C9 line at Target.

  8. #8
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    I've been getting Fox jerseys on sale at Price Point and HucknRoll. Paid around $20-25 each.

  9. #9
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    whatever...

  10. #10
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    I don't get the whole moisture wicking fabric thing,my shirts are still soaked when I finish a ride if it's hot and they still smell bad.I went back to regular shirts because I don't like the feel of the moisture wicking fabric.

    Edit:Sorry I didn't have anything to add to your thread.

  11. #11
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by njdj View Post
    Well, I guess I could do that. I carry any stuff I need to in my Camel back. Any recommendations on brand?
    Nike, Addidas, Prana, Reebok, Mizuno, Brooks, North Face, Marmot, Sierra Designs, Mt. Hardware, REI, Under Armor, Sock Guy, Fox

  12. #12
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    I have several Carhartt "Work-Dry" t-shirts. They're basically a simple front pocket t-shirt made with a hightech fabric that will wick better than a cotton t. I also use them when I'm traveling because you can wash them in a sink and they'll dry promptly.

  13. #13
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    I just use whatever I can find on sale that wicks sweat and breathes good. Every store I go to, I am always looking for dry fits (as I call them) and/or cargo shorts and I always go straight to the clearance racks.

    I admit that the dry fit shirts do stink but having a few laying around is good.

  14. #14
    SamIAm
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    just get a smartwool or icebreaker tshirt. done. and the most washing it really needs is to get rid of sweat stains is to just get it wet in shower and wring out a bit and it dries and good to go. and it no stinky bad.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  15. #15
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    If you have an outlet mall near you I'd suggest checking there. I managed to get some nice Adidas climalite and Nike dri-fit shirts for super cheap. I love them because they're somewhat form fitting, light weight, and really comfortable. Not to mention you don't get that awkward nipple rub nearly as bad from them as you would from a sweaty cotton shirt.

  16. #16
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    Under Armour, REI, Columbia, Nike... As others have said. And most stores will have some on clearance.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjaguar View Post
    For something inexpensive, I like the C9 line at Target.

    This^^. I have several of these and they don't just wick well, they breath well also. That seems to be pretty important for comfort with these wicking fabrics. I've found the nike dry fits also wick and breath very well but they are a bit pricier. I had an Under Armor shirt that wicks just fine but it doesn't breath at all. I'd stay dry but heat up like a blast furnace with it on and it's not intended to be insulative fabric. I gave it away.
    Last edited by skullcap; 02-16-2012 at 06:36 AM.
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  18. #18
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    Forgot to mention, if you have a BJ's wholesale, Cosco or TJ max, they usually have the above brands discounted.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by njdj View Post
    I have been wearing t-shirts for my trail rides but was thinking about getting a real jersey...something with good technical fabric. Here is the thing: I don't want it to look too much like a bike jersey. Any suggestions or recommendations?
    Ibex wool shirts. I wear them year round, -10 to 100+. Lots of different styles and weights available.
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  20. #20
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    I go to stores like Rugged Warehouse, Burlington Coat Factory, Foreman Mills, or the like and get Nike, Adidas, or Reebok sweat wick shirts on discount.
    Last edited by Drth Vadr; 02-16-2012 at 07:47 PM.

  21. #21
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    Agree with Sam and Shiggy. Wool tees are the ticket. They're more expensive, sure, but they're also more comfortable and they don't stink. I wear them for any outdoor activity, year round.

    That's not to say that I don't have and wear 3/4 sleeve nylon jerseys, but they're not as comfortable on warm days, and I usually pull them off at the end of a ride. Plus, they obviously look like bike jerseys.
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  22. #22
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    Gonna echo what everyone else has said... just go to any sporting goods or department store and get some dry wicking shirts...can be had for $20 or less each

  23. #23
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    The other shirt I wear sometimes is a Cloudveil Inertia Spinner. I got it on Steep & Cheap a few years ago for something ridiculous. It's basically a mid-weight softshell in the form of a button-up shirt. It's as comfortable in 50 degree drizzle as in 90 degree sun. I floated the Grand Canyon a couple years ago and wore it pretty much every day. For spring and fall rides with questionable weather, it's what I wear if I don't want to bother carrying a shell.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mestapho View Post
    I've been getting Fox jerseys on sale at Price Point and . Paid around $20-25 each.
    This jersey works well...doesn't look like a jersey per se, more like a T-Shirt....but still has a zippered rear pocket.

    Fox Baseline Jersey - Short-Sleeve - Men&#39;s*from Hucknroll.com

  25. #25
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    I'm a fan of Jett. They make matching shorts for their jerseys too. JETT MTB HOME
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    www.LightJunction.com

  26. #26
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    I bought "Hoss" jerseys for cheap from blue sky cycling, and I like them better than my expensive ones. Plus, they are subtle, no words, so I don't look like Lance Armstrong.

  27. #27
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    RoyalRacing.com for summer, I always ride in long sleeves. I'm also a big merino wool advocate for winter. Wear light weight. Ibex is the best, warmest and tightest knit. But any lightweight brand will do, I/O Bio, Patagonia, Icebreaker, SWOBO all made great stuff. You wouldn't want to bike in middle weight wool till well below freezing temps.
    agmtb

  28. #28
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    Good job! Grt

    For something inexpensive, I like the C9 line at Target.

  29. #29
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    Craft and Pearl Izumi, both well known cycling clothing manufacturers, make performance shirts that do not look like jerseys. They are tailored for cycling as they have longer tails, longer sleeves, and fit just a tad snugger. Options exist in long and short sleeves. These are my personal favs. North Face also makes good stuff that I like - general outdoor wear and cycle specific. Check them out!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mestapho View Post
    I've been getting Fox jerseys on sale at Price Point and . Paid around $20-25 each.
    Fox has some good looking jerseys. Many dont have the 3 pocket design

    Keep something in mind............
    Your shirt/jersey is your skin protection when you go down. So, look for something that's sturdy so to speak.

    I have this scar on my shoulder that is barely visible now from a crash at Downieville. I was wearing just one of those tech tshirts and the sleeve ripped right off. I had a worse (IMHO) crash on a gravel fire road (stupid deer) and was wearing a Fox jersey. No skin damage to me or rips in the jersey.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  31. #31
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    I like anything lightweight and wool like Swobo or Smartwool. They don't retain odor and just look like a shirt. I also have a few of the cheaper synthetic type shirts mentioned earlier but they tend to get really stinky so when I bring those I bring a shirt to change into for post-ride beers.

  32. #32
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    you can get jersey material polos as well sold for golfers and such

  33. #33
    SamIAm
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    wool works better but is not as durable as jersey material.

    i have use both depending on what there is to do.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  34. #34
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    Just throwing my $.02...
    If you have a Sports Authority near you check out the Champion Double Dry Core works well from $18 (short sleeve) to $21 (long sleeve).
    2012 Diamondback Podium 3
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  35. #35
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    Nike Dri-Fit shirts are awesome.

    Other than that, any tech fabric works wonders. Walmart, Target, Sports Authority, Dick's, etc all sell house brand tech fabric shirts for super cheap.

  36. #36
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    I basically wear the "performance" type t-shirts that are sold at Target. Light weight, breathable, wicks away sweat and dirt cheap.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alhazred View Post
    I don't get the whole moisture wicking fabric thing,my shirts are still soaked when I finish a ride if it's hot and they still smell bad.I went back to regular shirts because I don't like the feel of the moisture wicking fabric.
    Fabrics vary, and they can feel very different. I've had a couple that I loathed and now don't wear riding. I like the feel of the Polartec Power Dry (REI, etc.) in most weather and Patagonia'a silk weight Capeline in the hottest weather.

    The whole wicking-sweat-away-from-your-body deal is pretty much moot when you're a sweathog. No fabric can be expected to manage that much moisture. The benefit IMO is after it gets rung out, it doesn't have the wet and clammy feel of cotton. It'll still insulate. And it will dry quickly. "Cotton kills" has been a mountaineering adage for decades with good reason. In warm weather or for a short duration it doesn't matter, but otherwise it does.

    Perspiration has no smell. It's the bacteria that grows in it which stinks. "Deoderants" are virtually useless; try a strong antiperspirant like Mitchum. When I skip too many days I get the funk coming back, but otherwise I can drench clothes all day long on the trail and have zero bad odor from my clothes or armpits.

    Mike

  38. #38
    Dirt Huffer
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    Body paint.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alhazred View Post
    I don't get the whole moisture wicking fabric thing,my shirts are still soaked when I finish a ride if it's hot and they still smell bad.I went back to regular shirts because I don't like the feel of the moisture wicking fabric.

    Edit:Sorry I didn't have anything to add to your thread.
    You must not be getting correct stuff. I used to use 10 tshirts playing racquetball and now only 1. They are never soaked with sweat or smell bad. I will say that some so-called moisture wicking just are half as good as a T, and are half wet. So, I recommend you just buy one of a brand, and then when you find correct one... buy more. Cotten T-shirts I never wear anymore for sports.

  40. #40
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    Primal wear has some that don't really look like jerseys.

    Nashbar - Short Sleeve Cycling Jerseys

    I gave away a bride in this one this summer.

    Primal Wear Ritz Jersey - Short Sleeve Cycling Jerseys

  41. #41
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    I found a Club Ride "Go West" shirt on closout at REI and its pretty awesome.

    Pricey. But its definitely high quality and quite comfortable to ride in.

    Go West | Club Ride Apparel

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphic View Post
    I found a Club Ride "Go West" shirt on closout at REI and its pretty awesome.

    Pricey. But its definitely high quality and quite comfortable to ride in.

    Go West | Club Ride Apparel
    LOL

    $100 polo..one that I'll get dirty and likely rip...hmmmmm

  43. #43
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    What jersey that doesn't look like a jersey?

    Quote Originally Posted by sixstroke View Post
    LOL

    $100 polo..one that I'll get dirty and likely rip...hmmmmm
    I recommend both buying on sale and crashing less.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alhazred View Post
    I don't get the whole moisture wicking fabric thing,my shirts are still soaked when I finish a ride if it's hot and they still smell bad.I went back to regular shirts because I don't like the feel of the moisture wicking fabric.

    Edit:Sorry I didn't have anything to add to your thread.
    I felt the same way until I left the east coast and moved to california. The wicking really doesn't work if it's too humid. In dry heat though, it's freaking amazing. Rides that end in long descents I'm often almost completely dry (and I am a sweat hog).

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