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  1. #1
    L1MEY
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    One pair of shoes... which to choose?

    Since my hubby has decided that he prefers road biking to MTB we're buying each other road bikes for Christmas. I plan to equip mine with either some Eggbeaters or Candys so that I only have to have one pair of shoes that will work for road and mountain (my MTB pedals are Candys).

    I've been reading up on shoes a bit lately, mostly because my current shoes (Axo Cortinas that I found on sale for $10) have been causing me some trouble. I'm assuming that they're just not stiff enough because whenever I sit and spin for any length of time my toes go numb. I've tried adjusting the cleat position, which helped a bit but didn't solve the problem.

    I've heard great things about the fit and comfort of Sidis... the only thing that worries me is that the general concensus is they suck for walking on rocks (we have lots of those here). If they suck for rocks, they'd probably be the same way on pavement too

    So, does anyone else use the same pair of shoes for road and mountain? I have quite narrow feet, so a women's shoe would probably be best. There are a few shops in town where I can go to try shoes on... I'm just curious to know just how slippery Sidis are on pavement, and whether there are any good quality alternatives that might have better traction (so I know what I'm looking for when I go shopping).

    - Jen.

  2. #2
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig
    Since my hubby has decided that he prefers road biking to MTB we're buying each other road bikes for Christmas. I plan to equip mine with either some Eggbeaters or Candys so that I only have to have one pair of shoes that will work for road and mountain (my MTB pedals are Candys).

    I've been reading up on shoes a bit lately, mostly because my current shoes (Axo Cortinas that I found on sale for $10) have been causing me some trouble. I'm assuming that they're just not stiff enough because whenever I sit and spin for any length of time my toes go numb. I've tried adjusting the cleat position, which helped a bit but didn't solve the problem.

    I've heard great things about the fit and comfort of Sidis... the only thing that worries me is that the general concensus is they suck for walking on rocks (we have lots of those here). If they suck for rocks, they'd probably be the same way on pavement too

    So, does anyone else use the same pair of shoes for road and mountain? I have quite narrow feet, so a women's shoe would probably be best. There are a few shops in town where I can go to try shoes on... I'm just curious to know just how slippery Sidis are on pavement, and whether there are any good quality alternatives that might have better traction (so I know what I'm looking for when I go shopping).

    - Jen.
    I too outfitted my road bike with egg beaters and ride using the same shoes on the road as I do the trail, and I ride with Sidis. I don't know what people are talking about who say they suck for "walking on rocks," I've never had a problem with them anywhere, trail or pavement, rocks or not, and yes, they are super stiff. Also, if your feet are narrow, Sidis are prolly your best bet for a good fit.

  3. #3
    Bored Carp
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig
    So that I only have to have one pair of shoes that will work for road and mountain.
    You may want to consider getting a pair of shoes with carbon soles if you are going to use them for both road and MTB purposes. Stiff shoes could save you from suffering some hot-foot and other repetitive-pressure problems that tend to appear on the road. Additionally, I have found that carbon soled shoes wear out more slowly - if you are riding both on and off-road, a more expensive shoe now may save you some money later. Also, the higher power transfer of a carbon sole is pretty cool. Shimano makes a nice carbon sole shoe, so does Rocket 7 ($$$$ but worth it). I don't know who else - probably have to research it.

    Sidis, while very nice shoes, are flexy. I have always liked them on the dirt (very comfortable for walking), but they weren't adequate for long road rides.

    Enjoy your road bike!

    Cheers,
    Carla
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  4. #4
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    A woman can never have too many shoes! I say splurge for both pairs.

    And, if it helps justify it any, I usually need to replace my mtb shoes about once per season. But my road shoes can last 3-4 seasons. So you might even save in the long run.

    Of course, I buy a pair of each every season. But I have issues.

    Sabine

  5. #5
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    my shoe closet...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabine
    Of course, I buy a pair of each every season. But I have issues.

    Sabine
    Then I have issues, too ;-) Shoes are really important for anyone who spends a lot of time on the bike...

    Frankly, having the right pair of road shoes changed the way I raced last year, and I will spend what I have to to get the right fit. My sister just bought a pair of Manolos, but I am saving up for a third pair of Rocket 7s (MTB this time)

    At least we HAVE priorities, eh chica? ;-)
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  6. #6
    Homegrown
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    Agreed - more shoes is better

    I agree with others here - definitely get a road-specific shoe. I rode on MTB pedals/shoes on my road bike for a number of years, and couldn't believe the difference in comfort and power output when I switched to road pedals/shoes. The stiff soles of the road shoes are great for comfort, as are the larger platform pedals. I have a pair of Shimano road shoes that I LOVE! Hubby just got some fancy road Sidis that are pretty nice too.

    My bike shoe closet though looks like Imelda Marcos had a hand in the supply.....

    SheFly
    "Well behaved women rarely make history." - bumper sticker

  7. #7
    Loose Nut Behind d' Wheel
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    If you have narrow feet, try to find some Diadora women's Chilis, or try some Specialized women's shoes. I use mtb shoes on road and mtb, but have different shoes because I have different pedals and cleats. I'm on my 2nd pair of Chilis for mtbiking, and the first pair lasted several years. The 1st pair is still functional, but a little broken down, so they hang around as spares. As long as I don't use the toe studs in places like Moab, I have plenty of traction when forced to walk.

    On the road, I have a pair of Specialized Pro somethingorothers. I found them on clearance in Moab for 1/2 price. Amazingly, they fit perfectly, so I was willing to ignore the fact that they are screaming red. What both pairs of shoes have in common is laces. Velcro straps almost always "bottom-out" before I get them snug enough on my 9AA's. Not sure if Spec still uses laces, but they might still be worth a test-fit. Their Body Geometry footbeds are nicely contoured and supportive.

    Have fun shopping!
    Kathy :^)
    Look where you want to go. This is as true in life as it is in mtbiking.

  8. #8
    Inrideo est vita
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    Sidi's are very nice shoes. The best I have ever owned.

    I have a pair of the Sidi Dominators. They are very comfortable, but like most MTB shoes they are not good for long walks.
    Regarding rocks... I wore them at Moab and even went climbing up some of the steep slopes there to get pictures without too much difficulty. The local rocks here in Ontario can be quite challenging when they get wet, due to texture and moss/slime.

    In general, I think you will find that the stiffer the sole, the worse they are for walking and rocking

    my $0.02
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  9. #9
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSteel
    Sidi's are very nice shoes. The best I have ever owned.

    I have a pair of the Sidi Dominators. They are very comfortable, but like most MTB shoes they are not good for long walks.
    Regarding rocks... I wore them at Moab and even went climbing up some of the steep slopes there to get pictures without too much difficulty. The local rocks here in Ontario can be quite challenging when they get wet, due to texture and moss/slime.

    In general, I think you will find that the stiffer the sole, the worse they are for walking and rocking
    ^^^ SSteel's post about sums it up. And may I add that for a variety of very good reasons, selecting your biking shoes (be it road or mountain) based on how well they perform off the bike ... is a really, really bad idea. Just buy the best fitting shoe, with the best leather so they mold to your feet well, with the stiffest soles, and keep your feet where they're supposed to be -- on top of your pedals.

    As for multiple pairs, I'd normally agree more shoes are better, but like my shoes like my saddle: well broken in. So using one pair for both kinds of riding works for me.

  10. #10
    grasso e lento
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    I have Sidis but

    I have Sidi's for both and I have had no problems with either, well I did have a ratchet failure on the road shoes "they are older". The mtb shoes have not had issues with walking on rocks or any other surface.

    I will say that I tried on The NorthWave Aerator's and they are the MOSTEST COMFORTABLEST SHOES and I will be buying those next time!!



    -Dude
    If you wish to be out front, then act as if you are behind

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSteel
    Sidi's are very nice shoes. The best I have ever owned.

    I have a pair of the Sidi Dominators. They are very comfortable, but like most MTB shoes they are not good for long walks.
    Regarding rocks... I wore them at Moab and even went climbing up some of the steep slopes there to get pictures without too much difficulty. The local rocks here in Ontario can be quite challenging when they get wet, due to texture and moss/slime.

    In general, I think you will find that the stiffer the sole, the worse they are for walking and rocking

    my $0.02
    Damn, you people are more talented at walking in those things than I am then. I have some Sidis, but went and bought some rubber soled riding shoes after damn near killing myself every time I put a foot down on Slickrock.

    Mind you, on normal rocks, pavement, or whatever else I've never had a problem. But I feel like I'm wearing ice skates on steep slickrock. Whereas rubber soled shoes stick like glue on slickrock.

    I would definitely recommend Sidis in this case, regardless.

  12. #12
    Basura Blanca
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    Ditto, NuMexDonna wears a 10AA and loves her (women's model) Chilis. The lugs are also more rubbery than the plastic ones on many Sidis.

  13. #13
    here today
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    If your toes are going numb it could be your inner thigh/seat position - as you have already adjusted the cleats also take a good look at your seat front width or position.

    On the Sidis - there is big difference in grip between Dominators/Rampa and T1/Genius (Road) - stay far away from the later unless you like banana peel-like trips. The Rampa's are not that bad on rocks...

  14. #14
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    shoes for both

    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig
    Since my hubby has decided that he prefers road biking to MTB we're buying each other road bikes for Christmas. I plan to equip mine with either some Eggbeaters or Candys so that I only have to have one pair of shoes that will work for road and mountain (my MTB pedals are Candys).

    I've been reading up on shoes a bit lately, mostly because my current shoes (Axo Cortinas that I found on sale for $10) have been causing me some trouble. I'm assuming that they're just not stiff enough because whenever I sit and spin for any length of time my toes go numb. I've tried adjusting the cleat position, which helped a bit but didn't solve the problem.

    I've heard great things about the fit and comfort of Sidis... the only thing that worries me is that the general concensus is they suck for walking on rocks (we have lots of those here). If they suck for rocks, they'd probably be the same way on pavement too

    So, does anyone else use the same pair of shoes for road and mountain? I have quite narrow feet, so a women's shoe would probably be best. There are a few shops in town where I can go to try shoes on... I'm just curious to know just how slippery Sidis are on pavement, and whether there are any good quality alternatives that might have better traction (so I know what I'm looking for when I go shopping).

    - Jen.
    Hi, My husband also prefers road to mtn. I prfer mtn. to road. I use my mtn. bike shoes on the road. They are shimano and work just fine. Just a little dusty looking. When I road ride someone always ask if I am a mtn. biker, and it is based on my shoes and my camelback. ( I don't like reaching down for a water bottle anymore.) Find a good shoe that works for both. Like cross - training
    "Where am I going and why am I in this handbasket?"

  15. #15
    EDR
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    [QUOTE=Hello Kitty]selecting your biking shoes (be it road or mountain) based on how well they perform off the bike ... is a really, really bad idea. Just buy the best fitting shoe, with the best leather so they mold to your feet well, with the stiffest soles, and keep your feet where they're supposed to be -- on top of your pedals.

    Not trying to flame you here.

    Many mtbers like to enjoy the scenery off the bike as well. We are not all racers making our way through the world fast as possible. Stopping for a hike up the rockface or to the ledge of massive slickrock formations for awesome pictures is half the fun of riding.
    My point being is that for us, a shoe capable of safely, and comfortably hiking relatively short distances can be important.

    I use a lower end Specialized body geometry shoe. It has laces and doesn't cost $190 but it has a half plate and actual rubber grip/knobbies on the sole. For me, it's stiff enough for mtb'ing and flexible enough for hikes. I have however noticed that foot burn thing when riding my mtb on pavement for about 20 miles, but that is so rare it's a non-issue.

  16. #16
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    Dug this out of the archives for no reason whatsoever...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    grasso e lento
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    Now that would be a cool

    Calendar... I call calendar..
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenmonkey
    If your toes are going numb it could be your inner thigh/seat position - as you have already adjusted the cleats also take a good look at your seat front width or position.

    On the Sidis - there is big difference in grip between Dominators/Rampa and T1/Genius (Road) - stay far away from the later unless you like banana peel-like trips. The Rampa's are not that bad on rocks...
    I also had the numb toes issue. I tried many different shoes, moving cleats, changing riding position, alas nothing worked. I mentioned this to the doc one visit and it turned out that I had a neuroma that required surgery, now I can't ride for 6 weeks. The good news is my toes won't go numb after that.

    Just my $0.02...good luck and remember what Imelda always said, "you never can have too many shoes".
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  19. #19
    It's about showing up.
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    Sidis are gorgeous

    and they come in widths, which is great for my narrow feet. However they are, for a fact, terrible to walk in off road; they have little surface, and are slick as the plastic lugs are hard. The actual lugged surface is a full 3/4 inch narrower than my Lakes. I use my Lake 176 for dirt and they have proper grippy vibram-like soles and they are way, way better than the Sidi's. Walking on the road in Sidis is fine, especially if you are using spd cletes instead of those stupid road things, but they are rock hard.
    I do use my Sidis for dirt when I want to look really great but I recomend that you use a second pair of shoes for dirt. Sometimes numb toes are caused by having the shoe too tight at the ball of the foot and over the great toe.

  20. #20
    here today
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    Which Sidi's are you using - the high end one are a bit grippier... and it is probably about as expensive as having two pairs ...

  21. #21
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    I hear ya, Connie

    Quote Originally Posted by connie
    Damn, you people are more talented at walking in those things than I am then. I have some Sidis, but went and bought some rubber soled riding shoes after damn near killing myself every time I put a foot down on Slickrock.

    Mind you, on normal rocks, pavement, or whatever else I've never had a problem. But I feel like I'm wearing ice skates on steep slickrock. Whereas rubber soled shoes stick like glue on slickrock.

    I would definitely recommend Sidis in this case, regardless.
    I love my Sidis, but definitely had trouble walking on the Slickrock trail ("trouble" is putting it mildly...after I bailed on the ride, I actually had to have someone push my bike back up one of the hills 'cause I didn't have enough traction to walk it nor enough courage to ride it). The trouble is, it's hard to do a slickrock test at your LBS. If I ever get up the courage to try it again I'll likely use a pair of softer-soled shoes just so I can walk if necessary.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskarider
    I love my Sidis, but definitely had trouble walking on the Slickrock trail ("trouble" is putting it mildly...after I bailed on the ride, I actually had to have someone push my bike back up one of the hills 'cause I didn't have enough traction to walk it nor enough courage to ride it). The trouble is, it's hard to do a slickrock test at your LBS. If I ever get up the courage to try it again I'll likely use a pair of softer-soled shoes just so I can walk if necessary.
    The more I think about it - what got me even more than the walking was the stopping or dabbing. You'd unclip, put a foot down and WHOOSH... I'm halfway off of my bike doing the splits and sliding downhill. It's one thing if I wreck riding something challenging... but when I wreck walking, or trying to get off of my bike... ugh.

  23. #23
    It's about showing up.
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    Sidi Dominators

    Quote Originally Posted by zenmonkey
    Which Sidi's are you using - the high end one are a bit grippier... and it is probably about as expensive as having two pairs ...
    the knobs are about as hard as a plastic cutting board. I am not sure why they did that especailly considering that they are replacable. There is also less grip surface; I don't get that either.

  24. #24
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  25. #25
    L1MEY
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    Thanks for the advice everyone Since I need new MTB shoes I'm going to buy those first, so I'll go and try on some Sidi Dominators, Diadora Chilis and some Specialized and Shimano shoes too, just for good measure (gonna do that next week). I'm still not sure whether I want to get specific road shoes... the slide factor in 7/11 has me a bit wary. I'll make up my mind about that once I've found out how stiff the new MTB shoes are.

    - Jen.

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