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  1. #1
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    Mtn Bike Shoe that doubles as Hiking Shoe

    Does this animal exist?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaHorse View Post
    Does this animal exist?
    For flat pedals, that is....

  3. #3
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    Have you looked at pearl Izumi x-alps?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mtn View Post
    Have you looked at pearl Izumi x-alps?
    Not yet, but i will...

  5. #5
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    I use the PI X-alp shoe for adventure racing, where we will often have to drop our bikes trailside and bushwhack for a distance to locate a control point. Ive kept the shoes on for running portions of adventure races too. I think they do this FAR better than a conventional bike shoe.

    the only problem with a shoe that covers both activities, is that it honestly does both poorly. The allowable flex it has for hiking/running makes the shoe pretty soft for pedaling. It hikes way better than a bike shoe, and bikes way better than a trail runner, but i only wear them while adventure racing, when i know i will be doing a mix of hiking and biking seamlessly.

    depending on how long you plan on hiking it might be better to just pack a second pair of shoes.

  6. #6
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    For flat pedals, just get some 5.10s. That's pretty much all there is to say about flat pedal shoes, and they are good enough for walking. I wouldn't hike 20 miles in them, but I'd ask why you'd need to hike that far in bike shoes...

    The x-alps, like axcxnj said, are an ok compromise. They aren't great bike shoes, they aren't great running/walking shoes, but they are better better bike shoes than a typical running shoe would be and better running shoes than a typical bike shoe. Which isn't saying much; a typical bike shoe is only slightly better for hiking than an ice skate would be. I got these shoes for triathlons, and... well it's a balance between longer transitions to change shoes, and slower running and biking. For short tris they work ok...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    For flat pedals, just get some 5.10s. That's pretty much all there is to say about flat pedal shoes, and they are good enough for walking. I wouldn't hike 20 miles in them, but I'd ask why you'd need to hike that far in bike shoes...

    ......a typical bike shoe is only slightly better for hiking than an ice skate would be...
    That's funny !

  8. #8
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    The old 5.10 impacts are good for hiking, the only downside is the low tread, but that is what you want when riding.

    I have used mine for hiking in to go fishing and they are great for that, a lot of support and enough cushion.

    I don't know about the new model, but I am sure it would work fine.

  9. #9
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    Name:  5.10-Exum-Guide.jpg
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    Five-Ten makes a whole line of amazing shoes!! I have Freeriders and Exum Guide Hikers. It's in the rubber! Stealth Rubber is way sticky/grippy even when wet!
    Five-Ten is the tuffest shoe I have ever owned! I have very hard on my shoes..most are done in 6mos or so...
    Five-Tens start looking beat..I just HOSE them off, let dry and they look all new again..well minus the scrapes.

    5.10 fan FOR LIFE!!!!!!

    RIDE!
    Ride MORE = Live Longer
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  10. #10
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    @Burt4x4: That looks pretty good!

    @ others: To clarify, not really looking at a Biking/Hiking shoe as much as a decent show that can be worn off the bike on a light hike day or just comfortable to wear.

    I can afford one of each, but i had rather over analyze, just my nature, and spend 120.00 on a shoe that does both.

    Im not a downhill bomber or super technical guy. Just an old guy trying to stay fit while having fun! Thanks for all of your input!

  11. #11
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    SH, the wife and I have had great results with this sticky-rubber-soled approach shoe from the venerable mountain footwear company Scarpa:

    Scarpa Crux Approach Shoes - Men's - Free Shipping at REI.com


    They have a generous toe box and are very light. Not waterproof, but add a pair of shoe covers and voila. I don't even realize I'm not using my FiveTen Impacts on technical downhill. On tricky tech uphill they roll a little bit easier than the Impacts. They are sinfully light with a narrow overall outer sole, so they are like vapor to hike in. I use them in place of my Impacts whenever I'm planning a route with lots of HAB. We'll both be wearing a pair of these on the Great Divide this year.

    Durability is very good so far. I and others have used these shoes for big-wall rock climbing, which is insanely hard on shoes and feet. My shoes faired well with over 1000' of climbing on them, and the comfort was beyond many shoes, even some specifically made for that endeavor. FWIW.

    I love my Impacts to the ends of the earth, but on the Colorado Trail I swore they were overkill and I would try something different where substantial walking and long-wearing comfort were factors. While the Cruxes do it for me, pretty much any sticky-rubber reasonably flat/stiff sole approach shoe with a decent fit will work well. FT used to have a lock on sticky rubber, but competing mfrs have upped their rubber game and closed that divide.

    Also, wear a quality sock for hiking. SmartWool marketing is way better than their ho-hum products IMO. Thorlo brand has been my go-to for decades. I'll bet I have 15-year-old Thorlos with good padding still on the soles.

    Good luck!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post

    ....I don't even realize I'm not using my FiveTen Impac On tricky tech uphill they roll a little bit easier than the Impacts.....
    Thanks She&I,
    I do like Rei for the return policy, of course. Can you elaborate on the "roll" factor?
    You mean lighter or....?

  13. #13
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    I mean they are more likely to roll the pedal under the foot when hammering on the cranks through rough, bouncy uphill. Make sense? A small penalty for an otherwise very versatile and comfy shoe and a penalty one may never experience, since they are so walking friendly!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    I mean they are more likely to roll the pedal under the foot when hammering on the cranks through rough, bouncy uphill. Make sense? A small penalty for an otherwise very versatile and comfy shoe and a penalty one may never experience, since they are so walking friendly!
    Yes, makes sense, thanks!

  15. #15
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    Maybe it is better to get a light hiker / approach shoe and just use it for the bike?...
    OR grab a discounted Nashbar:

    Pearl Izumi X-Alp Seek III WRX Shoes - Mountain Bike Shoes

    Pearl Izumi X-Road Mountain Shoes - Closeout - Mountain Bike Shoes

  16. #16
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    Check out the Mavic Alpine XL....I have used Sidi's for years and will continue to used....but wanted a shoe for when doing a hike-a-bike, or rides where I just want comfortable shoes for commuting....

  17. #17
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    ONe more thought came to mind you should know. If you ever buy 5.10 thier shoes run tight. Both pairs I have are 11.5 and I normally fit fine in regular 11.
    So order 1/2 size bigger if you go that route....
    Ride MORE = Live Longer
    Love Dirt / Hate Pavement

  18. #18
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    I have been using these since last summer. Not perfect but they have served me well and the price was right. Definitely order a 1/2 size larger than normal if you go this route. The soles are a bit on the hard side, but I have never had any issues with them sliding off my metal pins. I went OTB once and the pedal pulled the shoe right off my foot. The main reason I got them was because they are waterproof and I wanted something to keep my feet dry during the colder months. I will say if they fill up they don't drain but no surprise there.

    Teva Royal Arch Shoes - Waterproof (For Men) - Save 36%


    Generally speaking I think most hiking shoes would fit the bill.
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladljon View Post
    Check out the Mavic Alpine XL....I have used Sidi's for years and will continue to used....but wanted a shoe for when doing a hike-a-bike, or rides where I just want comfortable shoes for commuting....
    This^,,,I just picked up a pair of the Mavic Alpine XL's. The past few years I've worn Pearl Izumi's but it seems as though PI has changed their sizing, 43 crushed my toes and 44 were too big. The Mavics in a size 9 fit great and seem true to size.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    For flat pedals, just get some 5.10s. That's pretty much all there is to say about flat pedal shoes, and they are good enough for walking. I wouldn't hike 20 miles in them, but I'd ask why you'd need to hike that far in bike shoes...
    +1 - great shoes on and off the bike....I'd hike 20 miles in them if biking wasn't an option!
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  21. #21
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    Mtn Bike Shoe that doubles as Hiking Shoe

    I just started riding these and love them so far. Very firm, yet when I need to get off and hike they get the job done.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  22. #22
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    A bit of an update:
    Tried out the Pearl Izumi X-Alps. Not for me. Too unstable due to the embedded clip-less insert that is very hard plastic and SLICK! Loved the stiff soles, though. Returned them to REI.

    Now trying Salomon XA Comp7 CS WP's. Nice stiff sole and pretty grippy. I think these are for me, even though a bit pricey. At the end of my ride today, I even sub-consciously twisted my foot out as if they were like my roadbike clip-less.......

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