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  1. #1
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    inside of windjacket was wet

    did a lite ride, 1 hour at 42 deg. Wore a long sleeve Starter compression shirt, a Performance liteweight fleece, and a liteweight Performance water repellent jacket. I treated the jacket with a water repellant sealant that I picked up from my local sporting goods store, as it is very old (but in good shape) and no longer repelled water.

    When I got home and tok of the jacketr, I discovered that there was a good bit of moisture on the jacket but my fleece was fairly dry. I was somewhat warm in my upper body while riding. The layering is slightly loose.

    Thoughts? Drop the fleece? Go short sleeve?

  2. #2
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    At 40-42 degrees I'm usually in base layer, thin wool and a cycling jersey. Below 40 I add another thin wool layer. I generally avoid jackets unless rain or below 30/windy. A second layer of light wool does a better job than a jacket or fleece. Everyone's different. Keeping a log of what works in what temps & conditions helps.

  3. #3
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    sweat. with the cool temps outside, I'd bet that the evaporated sweat that passed through your fleece was condensing on your cold outer hardshell layer.

    Softshell layers are WAY better for riding if you can afford them. Otherwise, you just have to deal with being wet from sweat because your hardshell is a very good vapor barrier at high exertion levels. If it's raining, you don't have much choice. Be cold/wet without a hardshell or be warm/wet with one. This is one reason I hate riding in 33-40F temps.

  4. #4
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    40 degrees today, playing around on the road, wore a thin wicking thermal and soft shell jacket. Had to have my jacket half open, was soaked inside, to cold to ride without do to windchill. Need to figure out something better for myself too.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    sweat. with the cool temps outside, I'd bet that the evaporated sweat that passed through your fleece was condensing on your cold outer hardshell layer.

    Softshell layers are WAY better for riding if you can afford them. Otherwise, you just have to deal with being wet from sweat because your hardshell is a very good vapor barrier at high exertion levels. If it's raining, you don't have much choice. Be cold/wet without a hardshell or be warm/wet with one. This is one reason I hate riding in 33-40F temps.
    Could you clarify soft shell layers? Is that like stacking up layers of Under Armour?

  6. #6
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    A "soft shell" is worn as an outer layer that is more breathable than waterproof. If exercising, they allow perspiration to escape while largely keeping you dry. The good one's do work, yet are $$.
    IME .. Waterproof - Breathable is pure marketing hype, as I too always get soaked from the inside out.
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  7. #7
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    what are some examples of a good softshell. Mostly what I've come across is the breathable water-repellant descriptions.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhlass View Post
    what are some examples of a good softshell. Mostly what I've come across is the breathable water-repellant descriptions.
    Men's Soft Shell Jackets at REI - FREE SHIPPING With no minimum purchase.

    You can get them in varying weights/thicknesses. Some are ONLY intended to be a breathable wind-blocking layer, while others incorporate some degree of water resistance. There is not a uniform standard, but none are water repellent enough to keep you dry in a downpour. They tend to have an athletic fit and are not well-suited to be layered over anything thick (pretty much just a baselayer and that's it, at most - I have one that is intended to be worn against the skin, as it is a wicking and wind-blocking layer, with a cycling cut). You CAN layer a loose hardshell over them if you need the extra protection from the elements. They tend to be marketed to high-energy activities like running, cycling, cross-country skiing, and to winter sports that require high dexterity like ice climbing. Many soft shell fabrics have stretch, which helps with mobility. Technical softshells usually have welded seams and are more stretchy and a very athletic cut. There are cheaper softshells out there that are non-technical garments with a more relaxed fit and sewn seams. I have one of these, too. It's okay for biking in, but not great. It's honestly the jacket I wear out in public the most, so I don't beat up my technical jackets so much.

  9. #9
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    I have a soft shell jacket and the same thing happens for me, it fills with sweat. Goretex, same thing. For me unless its raining I'm better off carrying the soft shell and putting it on when I stop.
    When you've seen someone rupture their scrotum on a bike you won't take the standards for top tube clearance lightly!

  10. #10
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    40+ degrees I usually just wear my short sleeve jersey and a light weight merino wool long sleeve base layer. Colder or if I get colder a merino wool sweater. Colder thermasilk as the bottom base layer. Colder a medium weight Columbia vest. I always carry a light weight gortext rain jacket that I picked up for a song at cabela's. Same experience as the other always gets wet but sometimes its critical to have a wind barrier or even a barrier to keep some heat in. Especially on long downhills.
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  11. #11
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    It happens. I have been riding alot more in the cooler weather this year and have been fine tuning my gear. I did a ride once with base layer LS jersey and shell jacket. Little cold to start, but finshed with base layer soaked, but due to the material never felt wet. I think it was 1 too many layers. So next ride out I started in the same 3 layers, but shed them as I rode on. Here temps can dip into the low 30's at dawn then warm up. One ride did started probably around 30F (there was frost on the ground) and finished a couple hrs later about 50 in the sun. In those conditions I layer it worked. Started a little cold with 3 layers and then as I started warm up I removed the outer shell for the big climb. Despite it being in the shade the heat of climbing kept my warm. I never need the jacket again that ride and never developed a big sweat.

    Lately I have been starting with the jacket and just LS jersey and knee warmers. I start in dark at 45 or so and then peal off as it warms up. Really it comes down to trial and error to pick the right layer for the conditions. Will it start cold and warm up? How much will the sun warm you as you ride or is there no sun at all. Will you be doing alot hard climbs building up body heat or riding a more casual pace? Long descents after big climbs can chill you too. There have been times I have used arm warmers then rolled them down to my wrists while climbing and then pulled the back up for the descents.

    There is no perfect answer.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Men's Soft Shell Jackets at REI - FREE SHIPPING With no minimum purchase.

    You can get them in varying weights/thicknesses. Some are ONLY intended to be a breathable wind-blocking layer, while others incorporate some degree of water resistance. There is not a uniform standard, but none are water repellent enough to keep you dry in a downpour. They tend to have an athletic fit and are not well-suited to be layered over anything thick (pretty much just a baselayer and that's it, at most - I have one that is intended to be worn against the skin, as it is a wicking and wind-blocking layer, with a cycling cut). You CAN layer a loose hardshell over them if you need the extra protection from the elements. They tend to be marketed to high-energy activities like running, cycling, cross-country skiing, and to winter sports that require high dexterity like ice climbing. Many soft shell fabrics have stretch, which helps with mobility. Technical softshells usually have welded seams and are more stretchy and a very athletic cut. There are cheaper softshells out there that are non-technical garments with a more relaxed fit and sewn seams. I have one of these, too. It's okay for biking in, but not great. It's honestly the jacket I wear out in public the most, so I don't beat up my technical jackets so much.
    Thanks for the link! just picked myself up the North face Android on sale.

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