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  1. #1
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    I think its time for some mountain bike shoes

    The soles of my running shoes have worn out to the point that it's just a smooth surface. I have had many pedal slips and I'm pretty sure it's because of this.

    I have thought about clipless, but I am still learning/having crashes. I did find it a bit harder to maneuver with the 29er than the 26 on my trails that have a lot of twisties and berms.

    I also thought about skate shoes, but I hear that they wear out fast, and flex a lot.

    What would you recommend?

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by John445 View Post
    What would you recommend?
    I wear these:

    Adidas Five Ten | FIVE TEN FREERIDER
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    Vik
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  4. #4
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    Five ten freeriders.

  5. #5
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    5:10s and done. Don't worry about clipless unless you're trying to race and want every last watt of power you can get. There's really no other advantage, and flats will keep you honest in terms of technique, which will make you better in the long run.

  6. #6
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    I've got 5-10 free rider pros and they are very good.

  7. #7
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    510ís and and HT pedals. Best combo by far.

    IMO. Flats are the only way to go. With the proper technique, you can put out the same watts as a clipless. Sam Hill is winning EWS enduro races on flat pedals.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Sam Hill is winning EWS enduro races on flat pedals.
    And multiple riders are winning EWS enduro races on clipless. Based on the op it sounds like John is getting good advice here and would do well with 510's but these clipless vs. flats wars are just dumb, obviously flats are not the only way to go and there are advantages and disadvantages to both systems.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    And multiple riders are winning EWS enduro races on clipless. Based on the op it sounds like John is getting good advice here and would do well with 510's but these clipless vs. flats wars are just dumb, obviously flats are not the only way to go and there are advantages and disadvantages to both systems.
    Its not a war on my part. But as one poster earlier said, if you want max watts go clipless. Well thatís simply not true.

  10. #10
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    I think its time for some mountain bike shoes

    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    as one poster earlier said, if you want max watts go clipless. Well thatís simply not true.
    If you have data to support this, please post it up! When sprinting on a trainer, I can accelerate faster and put out higher max power with clipless pedals.

    Yes, with good technique, you can apply power with your hamstrings on the upstroke with flat pedals, but it wonít be as powerful as with clipless pedals. (For the record, I love flats and will never again run clipless on a mountain bike.)

    Back on topic; canít go wrong with 5-10 freeriders.


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  11. #11
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    I have the Five Ten Freeriders and the Freerider Pros. I like them both. The Pros are a little more wet resistant and splashed mud/dirt can be wiped off. the Freeriders are more comfortable to wear all the time.
    2015 Scalpel Carbon Team/Eagle 1x12
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    510ís and and HT pedals. Best combo by far.

    IMO. Flats are the only way to go. With the proper technique, you can put out the same watts as a clipless. Sam Hill is winning EWS enduro races on flat pedals.
    EWS times are all primarily downhill, show me a flat pedaler that can win road cycling or XC racing, then you might have a chance of convincing me.

    That said I ride flats exclusively, best combo for me has been 5.10 freerider pros with DMR vault pedals.

  13. #13
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    5-10s and a good set of flats.. dmr vaults?

    for me, riding on flats lets me relax about bit more, cause i dont have to worry about my feet being locked onto the pedal, so i end up pushing myself more

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    5-10s and a good set of flats.. dmr vaults?

    for me, riding on flats lets me relax about bit more, cause i dont have to worry about my feet being locked onto the pedal, so i end up pushing myself more
    I switched to clipless and I am faster and climb better, but I agree, I am not as relaxed as before. Perhaps I am not having as much fun being worried of falling.
    My feet used to slip (with regular sneakers) when I powered up on a climb, thus the reason I switched to clipless. I have not tried 5-10s though.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by j102 View Post
    My feet used to slip (with regular sneakers) when I powered up on a climb, thus the reason I switched to clipless. I have not tried 5-10s though.
    Ya that was your problem. It's like trying to ride clipless pedals in flat shoes. It sort of works, but your performance sucks. You can't ride flats with crappy shoes and expect to get your bike performing well than you can using clipless pedals with flat shoes or the wrong cleats.
    Safe riding,

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    Ya that was your problem. It's like trying to ride clipless pedals in flat shoes. It sort of works, but your performance sucks. You can't ride flats with crappy shoes and expect to get your bike performing well than you can using clipless pedals with flat shoes or the wrong cleats.
    Yeah, I know.
    I jumped straight to clipless, bypassing the 5-10s and similar shoes. I wasnít sure they would give me the efficiency and performance I was looking for. Iím doing well with clipless but I think I am sacrificing some fun.

  17. #17
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    I don't race officially but every time I go out I race myself. I do enjoy riding the flats more than clipless when paired with the Five Tens. That being said, I find myself pedaling through more chunky stuff with the clipless where I coast through with flats on the hardtail bikes. I am faster with the clipless but I puss out quicker with them in the rock gardens.
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  18. #18
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    I've got five ten impacts and love them. Little heavy, but super grippy and durable. Had the 5.10 Maltese Falcon before, and also ride in my 5.10 Tennie hiking boots.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid Duffman View Post
    If you have data to support this, please post it up! When sprinting on a trainer, I can accelerate faster and put out higher max power with clipless pedals.

    Yes, with good technique, you can apply power with your hamstrings on the upstroke with flat pedals, but it wonít be as powerful as with clipless pedals. (For the record, I love flats and will never again run clipless on a mountain bike.)

    Back on topic; canít go wrong with 5-10 freeriders.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    I was a pro for many years and I use to ride clipless, then one year we had a new rider join the team who was riding flats. He was so fast everywhere. Thatís when I switched to flats. I did some watts testing and and first I couldnít put out the same watts, but after working on my technique I was able to match the power I was putting out on clipless. Like you said, the hams play a vital role on the upstroke.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by j102 View Post
    I switched to clipless and I am faster and climb better, but I agree, I am not as relaxed as before. Perhaps I am not having as much fun being worried of falling.
    My feet used to slip (with regular sneakers) when I powered up on a climb, thus the reason I switched to clipless. I have not tried 5-10s though.
    I have the opposite issue. I've been riding clipless exclusively for a decade, then decided to try flats to improve technique. It has taken some time to get used to it, but I get really tentative whenever I hit techy downhill stuff because I have a hard time keeping my feet firmly seated on the pedals. If anyone has any pointers, I'd appreciate it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpdemello View Post
    I have the opposite issue. I've been riding clipless exclusively for a decade, then decided to try flats to improve technique. It has taken some time to get used to it, but I get really tentative whenever I hit techy downhill stuff because I have a hard time keeping my feet firmly seated on the pedals. If anyone has any pointers, I'd appreciate it.
    Apply a bit of forward pressure on the handlebars and little rearward pressure with your feet. The opposing pressure keeps your feet glued to the pedals. If you can lift the rear wheel with flat pedals (without using the front brake), you've got it!

    I used to need to think about doing this, but now it's automatic, and my feet never get bounced off the pedals anymore.

  22. #22
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    Do you ever tilt one foot toe down, the other foot heel down, and apply opposing pressure that way?

    Also I thought with a lot of techy stuff you're supposed to drop your heels - is that not how you tend to do drops?

    What it seems to me is that my feet have to be a lot more active than I am used to!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALimon View Post
    Its not a war on my part. But as one poster earlier said, if you want max watts go clipless. Well thatís simply not true.
    if clipless was not the best at laying down watts, pro roadies would wear flats
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    if clipless was not the best at laying down watts, pro roadies would wear flats
    My impression is that when you start to get tired, and therefore a little sloppy with technique, it is nice to have clipless because they can compensate for not having perfect form. I'm sure if you concentrate with flats and good shoes with good pedals you can put out equivalent watts, but after riding for a few hours a person's ability to do that probably starts to suffer. Therefore I can see why having clipless would be an advantage in racing, especially longer races.

    I'm no racer, so for me the advantage with clipless is just having that added security of knowing my foot won't come off the pedal unless I want it to. Flats can also be nice though for a relaxed ride or working on technique.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpdemello View Post
    I have the opposite issue. I've been riding clipless exclusively for a decade, then decided to try flats to improve technique. It has taken some time to get used to it, but I get really tentative whenever I hit techy downhill stuff because I have a hard time keeping my feet firmly seated on the pedals. If anyone has any pointers, I'd appreciate it.
    First make sure the pedal right under the middle of your shoes. When you go through chunky stuffs drop the heels. When you go airborne (as in a hopping or jumping), follow the advice about pressure on the handle and pedals.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gumby_rider View Post
    First make sure the pedal right under the middle of your shoes. When you go through chunky stuffs drop the heels. When you go airborne (as in a hopping or jumping), follow the advice about pressure on the handle and pedals.
    So to make that work, I have to go from heels-down position to toes-down position on the pedals, right? So I'm kind of pressing my toes down when I hit something that makes me go airborn? That's kind of what has felt natural so far.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    if clipless was not the best at laying down watts, pro roadies would wear flats
    I raced in Europe on the road for 7 years before I switched to mtn bikes. The main reason roadies donít ride flats is because they donít need to, they are in a stationary position for longer periods of time and for sprinting. I have flats on my road bike simply because clipless bother my knee on longer rides these days. I do a local roadie ride, about 65 miles with plenty of climbing and have no problems hanging with the local racers.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpdemello View Post
    So to make that work, I have to go from heels-down position to toes-down position on the pedals, right? So I'm kind of pressing my toes down when I hit something that makes me go airborn? That's kind of what has felt natural so far.
    That's not what I'm saying. What I meant is when you are in the air intentionally as in jumping or hoping then yes toe down. You don't want toe down when hitting chunky stuffs, it will throw you off the bike/pedals.

  29. #29
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    I have the FiveTen Freeriders with the Spank Spike Pedals. Good combo.

    I ride with too many people that don't have proper form because they are clipless. I'm out there to have fun, and I have more fun in flats.

  30. #30
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    I ride both flats and clipless. Flats for chair and shuttle type rides and clipless when I have to grind up. I just find uphilling better clipless as I find Iím less sloppy when fatigued. In all, itís just personal preference as I believe efficiency or whatever is negligible between the two.

    I would however definitely recommend going flat if you are looking to improve technique in technical terrain.

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