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  1. #26
    Dinner for wolves
    Reputation: buddhak's Avatar
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    The more protective gear you have on, in a sense, the more protected you are. Only you, the rider, can weigh the cost/benefit accurately. Over the years I have accumulated more and more protective equipment. I regret none of the purchases. I may look like I am about to go to battle, but medical bills (as another poster mentioned) and sick leave from work are far more costly (to me at least). If you are still young, made of rubber, and poor (as I once was), then don't worry past the helmet and gloves. But if you can afford knee/shin/elbow/eye protection, then why not?
    Responds to gravity

  2. #27
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
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    Also note how the recommendations so far were for low profile, lightweight pads, rather than tougher hard shelled stuff. There are varying degrees of protection among pads. While one might worry about being impaled or soft shelled pads snagging and tearing/sliding, others might only want a bit of shock absorption to reduce chance of fracture to and a modest layer to save their skin.

    You will be more likely to wear the lightweight stuff if it goes on light and comfortable like a sock or whatever. Might be the difference between a heavy cotton hoody and a performance jersey in comfort (weight and heat), but during this time of year, if you're able to ride, maybe that's not a bad thing.

    Even I would think a motorcycle helmet and gear would look excessive (and silly) on a mtn bike, unless you're about to try something a motorcyclist would do.

    Here's an example of a "crash" on my hardtail. I sort of call it one, but most wouldn't if they saw how I sort of rolled out of it. Happens when you are appreciating the view, or watching a rut turn into ditch, and wondering how deep it gets. Well, I learned just how deep up close. Luckily, it didn't have anything that would be considered a hole, chasm, or abyss.



    Things happen too fast in the video too really catch the details, unless you play it in slow-mo or freeze/pause it often.

    Last edited by Varaxis; 12-22-2012 at 09:25 PM.

  3. #28
    T.W.O.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    I saw this vid posted somewhere else.


    Someone was trying to use it to support their argument for smaller bikes vs bigger bikes, saying how the "DH" guys were terrible and "MrNoSuspension" was schooling them. In this case, I want to point out how I thought the guys on the bigger bikes were properly equipped for this trail and their skill level. If they had the same equipment as the rigid rider, they would be bleeding, maybe broken, and/or maybe needing a heli-vac. Heck, some might even suggest that they had no business on that trail--not a very cool way to think.
    Well Mt lowe would humbled many skill riders regardless. On one hand, that camera angle made some section scarier than it is but, definitely for the most part it does not look as scary as the real thing. It's not so much the technical parts, but the drop off and trail width that constantly wearing you down. I rode them a few times a year and have never develop good relationship with any of them.

    There are a few trails like that around here Sam Merill is another good one. While I dab much less and notice that I'm probably 100 times better than my first ride, it's just the kind of trails that I'd ride fully padded.

    When it comes to protective gears, I'll say wear what you are comfortable with. If you know that the trails are technical and you feel you are not 100% put on your knee/shin pads, elbow pad and/or full face helmet. Don't let peer pressure push you to not wearing enough gears. It's better to look like a dork than to have the battle scars to show for

  4. #29
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    If your riding is going to be taking you downwards, at speed and hitting anything that'll get you air whilst wearing a FF helmet then get a neckbrace.
    Your collar bones and neck muscles/tendons etc will thank you...a lot! as you case that first big jump and end up in a heap on the floor

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    It's better to look like a dork than to have the battle scars to show for
    Especially if you're showing those scars from a hospital bed

    Call me old and uninsured ... I'd want to be tied to a helicopter if attempting some of those sections.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    XSportsProtective - The Original Protective Gear Store

    Free plug for one of my fav shops for protective gear. Their $20 off $100 + free SH makes for great deals on pads.

    I currently have these:

    G-Form Elbow Pads (Pair)
    Troy Lee Designs BP 4600 Hot Weather Padded Shorts
    Troy Lee Designs BP7850 Upper Body Armor

    They fit me a bit looser than I like and I haven't yet used them in a crash, so I can't yet really recommend them. Maybe go a size down from the fit chart, if you decide to go for any of them and like a closer fit. I'm skinny and don't really like baggy fits.

    I do recommend the Urge Down-O-Matic full face helmet (50% MSRP coupon code: 86Y-1-XZYWP ), if you're looking for a light decent looking FF helmet. It doesn't fit the shape over everyone's head though.

    I'm a fan of Giro DJ gloves too, as they're one of the few med gloves that my long fingers don't feel like they'll burst the tip of the gloves' fingertips out, and one of the few inexpensive ones with crash/skid padding on the palms.
    Can you still wear a padded butt liner with the Troy Lee padded shorts or do they have one built in? If so,would they go under the Troy Lee shorts?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jiggerjake View Post
    Can you still wear a padded butt liner with the Troy Lee padded shorts or do they have one built in? If so,would they go under the Troy Lee shorts?
    The TLD padded shorts are built like a standard bike short, with a padded chamois for the crotch/butt/seat area, and then the additional padding goes on the side of the hips, tailbone, and in some models, between the thighs.

    ...but yes, you could wear a butt liner under (or over) them if you want...

    -S

  8. #33
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    Besides the basics, you should put on protection depending on speed and terrain. Baseball size rocks, swift descents, loose dirt, my gforms come out. Fast descents, baby heads, ledge drops, jumps, hard shell time. I only wear a full face when I'm pushing my skills speed, turning, terrain wise.

    Those guys on the video really needed all that armor. They were crashing like they were getting paid to do it. If you can't avoid an obstacle with your handle bars, you need to take lessons

    My worst injuries happened when I was wearing full body armor and a full face helmet. Armor won't save you from broken bones. Ride within your skills, learn good technique and practice practice practice.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    I currently have these:
    [...]
    Troy Lee Designs BP 4600 Hot Weather Padded Shorts
    [...]
    I haven't yet used them in a crash, so I can't yet really recommend them.

    @Varaxis or anyone else using TLD's padded shorts:
    Have you finally used Troy Lee Designs BP 4600 Hot Weather Padded Shorts? What's your opinion?

    Are the protective pads large enough? Do they cover nicely the hips and thighs? Are they meant to protect only from scrathces and bruises, or do you feel they offer some higher level of protection?

    Are they comfortable so that you can ride uphill with them? Is their chamois good?

    I'm also in for protector shorts, after a painful hit on my right hip. I was going downhill slowly, but I neverthelessbeated it violenlty, with all my weight. I'm looking for something I can use for all-mountain rides, so hard protectors are not an option.

    I'm considering also these, from the apparently most protective to the least (only considering pictures and some comments I read):
    - Fox Racing Titan Race Shorts
    - O'Neal Protector Competition Shorts
    - Endura E0074 Protector Liner Shorts

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Even at the Trail/AM level, I think some amount of armor is needed.
    [...]
    What I got thus far:

    Troy Lee 7605 Butt/hip protector (I like this so much I'll probably buy another so I can rotate them and keep them from stinking LOL)
    [...]
    These seem the most protective I've considered so far. Is it true or just a visual impression?

    Plus, are they comfortable for pedalling?

    Do they have a chamois? Is it good?

  11. #36
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
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    Protection on the 4600 is pretty light, but they don't get in the way of shorts or pedaling or heat much at all. Can squish the foam padding down to almost nothing with very little force, and I most definitely feel punch impacts through them, which isn't a good sign. No chamois on the 4600. Did 3000+ft of climbing in a few hours on them Sat, and another 8-10 miles of rolling hills on another trail a couple hours after that.

    I've used the POC shorts before and like them, but they were hotter and bulkier and were tearing.

    I used the 661 shorts before and thought right away that they wouldn't work for cycling. Pads where just in the wrong place (on the quads/front, instead of the sides).

  12. #37
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    Thanks, Varaxis.

    So the 4600 don't feel the best choice for me. I'm looking for something offering some more protection. My last fall scared me a bit, and I realized I need some protection when riding on rocky technical trails.

    Perhaps the 7605 would be better in this regard?

  13. #38
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    Depends how cool you wanna look..

  14. #39
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    Get the pads. You won't regret it. I started riding last year and always dive head-first into things I should probably wait on. I was doing stuff in my first two weeks that a lot of people don't do in their first two years. I would have earned myself stitches on multiple occasions if I hadn't been geared up appropriately. If you plan to push yourself at all, you'll want the gear. I actually started with baseball shinguards and quickly upgraded to some six-six-one knee-shin combos that were only $50. They're hardly top of the line, but I'm on a budget too and they do just fine. Also, get gloves. You'd be surprised how often you'll be sticking your hands out or turfing it and messing up your palms.

    I've found I'm more confident and attack things harder when I'm geared up. It makes riding more fun when you can "go for it" and still have a reasonable expectation that you'll come out of it in tact!

  15. #40
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    body protection

    You may want to check out my company body shield apparel
    I started this company because I could never afford equipment after I bought a bike

  16. #41
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    first MTB? get a helmet and some gloves and buy more protection as you get more aggressive.
    id prob start with knee pads.

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