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  1. #1
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    Flat sole durability

    I tried to commit to riding flat pedals, but my Giro Jackets look like this after a dozen XC rides on VP Vice pedals:

    Flat sole durability-img_20180516_165644_093_crop_640x640.jpg

    They grip pedals less and less with each ride. You could find me if I died in the woods by following the trail of grey Vibram bits I leave as I go.

    Did I get some soft shoes or is it possible that some aspect of my trail and riding just eats shoes? I would pay a little more for something that lasts, but I feel like an absolute sucker for.paying for than $100 for shoes. If Five Tens or Aftons do this, I'll be pissed.
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  2. #2
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    My 1st gen Mcaskill is 510 Freeriders are years old and still usable. I ride Hope pedals though with less aggresive rounded style pins. Theres a pair of nasty pedals in my closet somewhere that would make mincemeat out of soles, it did on my shin!

  3. #3
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    The VP Vice pedals I use have pretty sharp pins.

    Name:  vice.jpg
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    Any chance that pedal with fatter, rounder pins and some Five Tens would be less destructive? I was about to buy Xpedo Sprys when I got the Vices.

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  4. #4
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    Here's what my Five Ten Freeriders look like. I wasn't tracking mileage until this year but with a little extrapolation, I'm going to say they have between 500-600 miles on them, with Chester pedals. I haven't noticed a reduction in grip at this point.

    Flat sole durability-five-10s.jpg
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  5. #5
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    I haven’t had those exact soles, but the shoes I used before had vibram soles. The rubber wasn’t soft at all. I found them to be a firm rubber and the tread had me always adjusting my feet to get them in a comfortable spot. My guess is, those tiny knobs on yours are actually a little firm and break off when you twist your foot. I bit the bullet and bought some freeriders, and they are easily worth every penny. The adidas store has sales, often. They had one last week on (5/10)2018. The soles are slightly stiff for support, but the nearly treadless rubber is soft and tacky, while being very durable and not tearing. Also, the tack and lack of tread allows you to stick you foot on the pedal in any position without feeling like you have to adjust to get your tread set comfortably. I never think about my feet or pedals anymore. Just hop on and ride with confidence. I can’t vouch for long term durability yet, as I have only put about 120 miles on them, but the soles still look brand new, wear wise. I am on spank oozy and wellgo mg-1 pedals.
    Flat sole durability-b849d82d-3061-4859-8281-321448149921.jpg

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I tried to commit to riding flat pedals, but my Giro Jackets look like this after a dozen XC rides on VP Vice pedals:

    They grip pedals less and less with each ride. You could find me if I died in the woods by following the trail of grey Vibram bits I leave as I go.

    Did I get some soft shoes or is it possible that some aspect of my trail and riding just eats shoes? I would pay a little more for something that lasts, but I feel like an absolute sucker for.paying for than $100 for shoes. If Five Tens or Aftons do this, I'll be pissed.
    honestly i'd contact giro about this. i've had several shoes with vibram soles that don't look this bad after years of riding. no shoe should look this way after 12 rides regardless of the pedal used.

  7. #7
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    honestly i'd contact giro about this. i've had several shoes with vibram soles that don't look this bad after years of riding. no shoe should look this way after 12 rides regardless of the pedal used.
    Yup... this is not normal.


    Thanks for posting, not that I would have tried Giro shoes anyways.

    I'd recommend 510 Freerider Pro, they are awesome.

  8. #8
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    Giro told me that they will warranty shoes for a year. I have had these for more than a year for certain, but most of that time they were on a shelf because I was riding Giro Carbides with cleats. I definitely did not get a year's worth of riding out of them before it became obvious that they were not going to hold up. I guess that's what I get for trying to save a few bucks! still, Giro should try harder.

    Five Ten / Adidas: the Martin Shkreli of shoe manufacturers.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 05-17-2018 at 03:03 PM.
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  9. #9
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    5.10's FTW...

    Mine have been going strong for 18+ months.

    Plus, I'm in the Sam Hill school of thought i.e. pins out as far as they'll go.

    Sharp, threaded ones to boot.

    I'll likely get another 18 months out of them.

    But, I'm contemplating getting a pair of Shimano AM5's & going 99.9% of the time clipless o_0

    Currently I ride 70/30 clips vs flats

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    ...I have had these for more than a year for certain, but most of that time they were on a shelf...
    interesting you say that as my first thought was rubber rot. don't know the history or environment but it definitely looks like that could be the main issue.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    interesting you say that as my first thought was rubber rot. don't know the history or environment but it definitely looks like that could be the main issue.
    Nah, they were sitting on a shelf in my closet, near a bunch of other shoes that have not broken down. I have had them less than two years, but too long for warranty. I have other shoes that I have used for casual riding that are over 5 years old. I usually wear my shoes until they rot off, but that takes years, not weeks.
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  12. #12
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    Yeah seems like for some reason those particular soles on your shoes started to degrade and then the aggressive pins on the VPs just did them in. Unless you are noticing a difference in how they grip I would keep riding them. I have some Impact VXi that I wore with my Xpedo Spry (didn't like them) and really while they gripped they did not do all that great.

    Seems like there needs to be more thought put into the particular sole design and the type of pedal you are using (threaded pins vs rounded) than we usually do. I now have a pair of Adidas Terrex Cross Trail SL and while I love them (so light and feel great, good traction) they cannot compare traction wise to the VXi with the Vault pedals (thread pins like your VPs).

  13. #13
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    There was a discussion at the local shop the other about this. The confusion is that soft soles last longer than harder soles. The harder rubber “chips” as pointed out by slowpock above. Makes sense to me to go softer.

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