Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    363

    Cold Weather Clothing Options

    Finding XXL cycling clothes is a PITA, finding XXL cold weather cycling clothes is an XXL PITA.

    I am tempted to forget about buying "cycling-specific" clothes and just buy stuff that'll work.

    That said, do you guys think this would work as a cold-weather jersey?

  2. #2
    ColoradoCoolBreeze
    Reputation: SingleTrackLovr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    679
    I think Carhartt is an exellent company and find their cloths work great for cycling. Just stay away from the Duck cloth. It's a bit too stiff. The neck gater, gloves, shirts, sweaters, socks are all super for biking.

    Cross country ski gear is also a good choice for winter biking.

  3. #3
    Black Sheep rising
    Reputation: utabintarbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    917
    Quote Originally Posted by beanfink
    Finding XXL cycling clothes is a PITA, finding XXL cold weather cycling clothes is an XXL PITA.

    I am tempted to forget about buying "cycling-specific" clothes and just buy stuff that'll work.

    That said, do you guys think this would work as a cold-weather jersey?
    I have found that the duo-dry C9 stuff from Champion (available at Target) has worked quite well when layered. I usually can get away with a short-sleeve t-shirt covered by a long-sleeve shirt and a windproof jacket (also from Champion) along with some windproof pants over long cycling tights will keep me pretty comfortable down to the teens.

    And I agree the Carhartt jersey linked would work well. I have also heard really good things about Under Armor cold gear as a base layer (though kinda pricey).

    Then you only have to worry about the extremities. Pogies and Lake winter shoes do a pretty good job.
    Let the market decide!

    N42.58 W83.06

  4. #4
    dh1
    dh1 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dh1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    436
    I just picked up a set of cold weather tights from Dicks Sporting goods. They weren't cycling specific, but if you toss a pair of bike shorts over them, they would be good. I was able to squeeze into a large size pants and XL shirt. ( normally wear 36 inch waist pants and XL size shirts)

    They are warm as hell for a base layer. They had XXL on the rack. I paid $35 for top and bottom combined on sale. Plan on wearing them layered under wind breaker jacket and dry fit shirt\, possibly windbreaker/jogging pants if it gets really cold.

    Next is some lightweight globes and something to cover my ears/face.

    Edit: Globes was a typo...meant gloves
    Last edited by dh1; 12-27-2007 at 07:03 PM.

  5. #5
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,670
    You didn't post your size, but I'm 6'6" 250+ and need some big clothes. I never buy cycling clothing (winter or summer), you get better sizing with general outdoor stuff, "expedition" clothing or whatever.

    I recommend wearing a thin poly base layer -- I like Helly Hansen but many companies make it -- and then a second layer of wool. I use this Ullfrotte stuff for the wool layer but there is also Smartwool, Icebreaker, etc. This set-up works for me down to about -15 C or so, keeping me warm but not overheating. Below that, or if there is wind, I will add a thin windbreaker jacket (with pit zips) as a third layer.

    For your legs, you can find insulated tights or ski pants at places like MEC or REI in large sizes. Try xc-skiing stuff.

    Your hands and feet are most important, don't go cheap on mitts or footwear. Your core can heat itself pretty well but extremities not so much.

    Your biggest fear in winter activity is getting too hot, sweating too much, and then the sweat freezes and you are cold. Always dress so you can remove layers. Go for outdoor stores rather than cycling stuff for the better fit for a big guy

    Regards,
    Anthony

  6. #6
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by beanfink
    That said, do you guys think this would work as a cold-weather jersey?
    Forgot to add, Carhartt is great stuff, provided you avoid anything cotton in the winter, which is a lot of their stuff. If you stick to poly, wool or some kind of blend it would be fine.

    That being said, I often ride in my (cotton duck) Carharrt overalls when it's really cold.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  7. #7
    Slow climbin' clyde
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    190
    Not as tall as you, but I do have similar other dimensions. I ride about 15 hours a week and here's my normal winter setup, mix and match:

    - Smartwool or Patagonia base layer. I wear XL so they can fit snug. I wear a size 50 jacket so the XXL versions should be fine for you. They're available at REI so you can try them on.

    - Pearl Izumi XXL bibs. You should have no trouble with those either. I wore them at 6'3" 298.

    - Pearl Izumi XL ThermaFleece tights. They wear bigger than XL would lead you to believe, and they fit comparably to the XXL bibs.

    - North Face windproof pullover. This is where cycling gear has really let me down on the past. I found that there are more options in the "outdoor fitness" section of REI and other stores. Something like this is what I have, and it has naturally long sleeves and a tall cut. Add an extra base layer if it gets well below freezing.

    - Wool socks. A must.

    - Novara or PI skullcap

    - Pearl Izumi Cyclone gloves. They have others that are warmer if you need those, but I've been good with those down into the teens.

    Hands, feet, head, core.

    Last bit of advice: listen to any winter riding counsel offered by a rider from the Yukon.
    “Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.” - H.G. Wells

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    794
    This is what I wear here in Ohio in the winter to jog in or hike in.

    Underarmour cold gear leggings and mock turtleneck
    Nike windproof running gloves
    A columbia windproof water resistant fleece
    Underarmour socks (they work awesome in the cold with my new balance running shoes)
    A columbia beanie style head cap

    I never get too hot or too cold even when the temps dip below the teens.

    Underarmour stuff is amazing.

    The best way to buy it is go to Dick's Sporting Goods and sign up for their score card program (it's free and is not a credit card). For every 200 points or so you get a 10 dollar gift card and well by the time you buy a decent fleece, some underarmour leggings, mock turtle neck coldgear then you can get about 20 bucks off.

    Especially now since they have lots of their north face and columbia fleeces on sale for like 25 bucks!

    I just picked up a new $100 columbia fleece with the moisture wicking liner for $20!

  9. #9
    Fat guy on a bike
    Reputation: Mordy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    703
    I've rocked some colder rides wearing:

    Underarmor cold gear tights with a regular pair of lycras underneath.
    Baggy shorts over that.
    Underarmor cold gear top
    A regular jersey over that
    A polar fleece sleeveless jacket to keep the core warm
    A packable windproof jacket for the downhills
    Full finger gloves
    Regular MTB shoes, hiking socks.

    Underarmor comes in larger sizes for football players but you might have to order it.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: California L33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    699
    I know folks don't always like Performance (they never seem to have anything but small and extra small available), but-

    thermal jersey, XXL and XL in stock, under 20 bucks-

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=1111

    thermal jersey, XXL and XL in stock, 30 bucks-

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/....cfm?SKU=24404

    Beanfink, I don't have either of these exact jerseys, but I do have a couple of Performance thermal jerseys (that are no longer made). They work with just a cycling jacket down to about 50 degrees for road biking (colder for mountain biking because you don't have the continuous wind chill). At about 45 degrees I put a T-shirt on underneath, and anything colder another layer of fleece. What temperatures are you riding at, and how hard are you riding?
    To the troll mobile, away...

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Can-O-Yeti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7

    Another option

    I have become addicted to long underwear carried at Sierra Trading Post. I typically wear tights in a tall size (I got mine at Nashbar), a thermal base layer like this one, a short sleeve jersey, and long underwear top (more of a fleece jersey) like this one. Both of these selections from Sierra are in tall size and the XLT size fits my 6.5 ft frame great. The outerlayer is even long enough to cover my arse. For the price, it is hard to beat as long as you like layering. At the price I don't even mind catching the outerlayer on brush.

    Keep in mind that I am riding in the mountains of AZ and highs this time of the year are in the 40's.

  12. #12
    Crunchatize me Capn'
    Reputation: jabpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    2,897
    The most important thing to learn when it comes to clothing is...
    1. Material

    2. Design

    It doesn't matter where the clothing comes from, what it is labeled as, or how it is marketed. Liner socks can just be mens nylon dress socks. Running clothing can be cycling clothing which can be hiking clothing which can be skiing clothing ad nauseum.

    The design of a garment can give clues as to its usefulness for a given temperature range. For exmaple: If you want a fleece midweight jacket that you are to use as a wind barrier does the zipper have a full length wind flap? If not it probably is mostly a jacket for looks and not intended to be used for excersise. Does it have nylon on the outside at parts? It will probably provide some wind resistance as well as durability at those sections. If you don't know what type of fleece material (some are more wind resistant that others) it's better to err on the side of caution and not get something unless it's cheap or very easy to return.

    The main trick is to figure out what exactly is giving you what you want. For example: merino wool is a material that when wet will still provide warmth retentiveness. It doesn't matter what the garment is designed or inteded for. It is the material in this case giving you the properties that you desire and merino wool is merino wool. If a merino wool sweater has a zip top then the zipper is not merino wool and if there is no fabric behind it (windflap) you are left with what the zipper is able to "do" or not. A zipper lets in wind and for that part of the merino wool sweater you don't get merino wool warmth. On the other hand a zipper can help with ventilation if say you're going up a hill and need to cool off a little.

    Also just about every tag I've ever seen on a garment does not fail to mention a specific quality it is trying to market. If something can be wind proof you better believe it will be listed on the hang tangs in some fashion. If it's not on there the design can then give clues as to what the garment can do or not but usually if it's not on the tags assume it won't do wind resistance or whatever it is you're looking for. This is another reason to learn fabrics and their typical marketing names as sometimes this alone is put on the tag and either you know the characteristics as an informed shopper or you don't.

    I hope this helps.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •