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  1. #1
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    Yeti AS-X vs. Spec Enduro Expert

    OK, let it all hang out. I want to hear it all. I have heard the Enduro head tube can ovalize with too much FR abuse. The Yeti is heavier but sure seems gorilla-like in strength. How is the Yeti as an aggressive All Mtn Bike, lots of rocks up here. I climb, no shuttling and know the AS-X is heavier, what does everyone think??

  2. #2
    ride hard take risks
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    The ASX will shred a Spec. They are real AM/FR/DH bikes.
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  3. #3
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    Enduro pedals a lot better though.
    It also rocks on the descents, it feels just a bit firmer as the ASX.
    The ASX is an awesome bike, if you want plush at all cost, take the Yeti. It is a bit harder to get to the top though (although youīll get used to any bike pretty soon)

    If you do more AM than FR then take the Enduro, they take PLENTY of abuse. Good warranty also. If you stand and hammer in the Enduro it accelerates well. If you do that on the Yeti, not that much of your energy will immideately transmit. Itīs ok, it has really a lot of travel. But itīs not as snappy as the Spec.

    Greetings Znarf

  4. #4
    TNC
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    What year Enduro are you referring to? This might make a big difference in the answer. The ASX is a pretty easy assessment. It's basically a stiffer "old style" Bullit design IMO...strong, reliable, decently heavy. Being a big, simple, single pivot, the ASX isn't the greatest climber, but with a quality stable platform shock, it isn't horrible by any means. A lot will depend on how beefy you build it up.

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    Iīm referring to the newer (NOT the SL) Enduro, 2005 model and newer.

    The ASX has one big advantage over the Bullit, itīs linkage which makes it more progressive. Therefore it feels bottomless. And youīre right itīs not an awful climber, I spent a lot of time on both (actually on an ASX and my 2007 SX Trail, custom build). I find that the FSR climbs better on technical/rooty uphills, because it has no pedal kick.
    The ASX bobs less. The FSR transmits energy well, but it bobs a little bit, because itīs so sensitive.

    greetings znarf

  6. #6
    TNC
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    Yeah, but what Enduro is the OP referring to? I think they had FSR Enduro Expert models all the way from '99 to the present...I had a '99 Enduro Expert...LOL! I'm just wanting him to specify which one.

    Your comment on the bobbing inherent in the Enduro is interesting. With a proper shock, I don't notice them to be particularly overactive at the rear suspension...for any year model. We sell Specialized at our shop, and I'll say the VPP is more efficient overall as it relates to any bobbing, but all of our single pivots that I've ridden are pretty much more "bob prone" than the FSR models. Like I said though, I don't find many bikes to be bob-o-matics anymore with the some of the kinds of rear shocks available these days.

  7. #7
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    I think with a proper tuned SPV/ProPedal/PVA or whatever platform shock you can get most systems bob free. I mean, with a DHX5 set on fully active, no ProPedal. The FSR bobs a tiny bit (really tiny, first 3mm of stroke maybe, on the 36teeth ring that is). I think the bobbing comes more from my body movement while pedaling, so itīs probably less pedal induced than my ass pushing on the saddle and that making the frame bob a little.

    The high pivot point of the ASX (or a Heckler, my previous ride) actually helps lessen the "bob". The chain pulls on the rear of the frame and calms it down. Thats why Hecklers pedal quite well even with really active shocks. At the same time this design causes pedal kick.
    As is with VPP, when standing and hammering in the pedals, thereīs quite a lot of pedal feedback too. At least thatīs my experience.

    So, for my riding style (I have a heavy trail bike, donīt care that much about pedaling efficency, as I tend to think, if I donīt make it, I just didnīt try hard enough) the 4bar FSR is really, really good. Climbs nice, descends very well and is active under braking. I actually sell a lot of Specializeds too, over here in Germany. (at the shop I work part time )

    VPPs are not as common over here, as companies donīt have to pay royalties to Specialized for 4bar frames. So many german frame builders use the 4bar design. Santa Cruz, Intense etc. are beloved but ridiculously expensive. A Nomad frame costs 2-3 times the price compared to the US and also spare parts and warranty claims take really long.

    So if you get 2Sx Trail frames complete with Thomson seatposts and lifetime warranty for the price of one Nomad frame, most people will buy the SX over here.

    Funny thing: I had a white Heckler before, literally on every single ride I met/saw another mountainbiker I got asked about the Heckler, how much I payed for this fricken expensive frame etc. Santa Cruz is linked to $$$$$$$ in most european brains . ..


    Greetings Znarf

  8. #8
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    I ride an AS-X and use it for shuttle runs and AM riding. Seated pedaling isn't bad. Once you stand it gets ugly.

    Mine is currently set-up with a 5th Element but I have a ROCO TST which I am hoping gives me the best of both worlds. For climbing I can lock the rear out with a the flip of a switch and just as easily open the compression up for rocky descent. There are also setting inbetween which work well for not so steep single track.

    If the SX Trail came big enough for me I would buy one of those and build it semi light. Another bike to look at is the Cannondale Perp. It has a very nice leverage curve thanks to its linkage. The travel is also adjustable between 180mm and 200mm just in case you want more travel at any point.

  9. #9
    TNC
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    That's interesting on the pricing issue on SC in your area, Znarf...ouch! Thanks for that insight. World markets can be weird.

  10. #10
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    asx

    i set up my asx as an aggressive trail bike, have a marz all mountain 1 in front and lighter wheelsets just to lighten things a bit, i call this bike my magic bike(considering its weight) since i can really climb this rig in this set up, not as fast as other lighter bikes but very comfortable to pedal and of course the all smiles downhill...in fact,i find my asx more comfortable to pedal and ride than my prophet, not as fast in climbing though. as for the bob, have no issues with it both my bikes, single pivots with spv shocks, both of them. i believe single pivots bikes accelerate faster than multi links, fsr and it bobs less.. have lots of friends with fsr bikes. the asx is really a versatile bike, it depends on how you set it up.

  11. #11
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Znarf
    The ASX has one big advantage over the Bullit, itīs linkage which makes it more progressive. Therefore it feels bottomless.
    Actually the linkage just makes it stiffer so it doesn't tweak the shock. The ASX leverage curve is definately NOT a selling point, actually it is a compromise inherent in the high forward pivot design. The ratio moves from 2.5 : 1 initially to 3.5 : 1 at bottom out, so getting the right feel and bottom out resistance is entirely dependant on the boost valve settings, and pedaling is dependant on spv. IMO, it is a good compromise if you don't want to spend a lot of money on a 4 bar bike but still want a rearward axlepath to perform better on the dh. The leverage curves of vpp bikes are far superior, IMO...

    .




    Strava: turn off your dork logger when you're not on sanctioned trails.

  12. #12
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    I was referring to a '06 Enduro Expert. Everyone gave great advice and input as well. I am leaning towards a bigger bike. So, I will keep the end exp and probably pop for an AS-X. With my luck, Yeti will launch a bike like tha Nomad situated between the AS-X and 575 right after I buy.................doh!!!!!! I actually liked the way the AS-X pedaled and the action of the DhX Coil better than my DHX Air...................opinions????

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tls36
    I actually liked the way the AS-X pedaled and the action of the DhX Coil better than my DHX Air...................opinions????
    Personally i like the Coil over the Air because it is more predictable & smoother on the mid through full impacts. Air is nice on the low speed stutters & is actually getting closer the that sweet spring feel but not quite there yet. On the extreamly rare side should a air fork blow out you can jam a stick inbetween the steer stem & fork brace, yuck, if the shock blows guess your lowriding.
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  14. #14
    TNC
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    I'm not surprised about the DHX Air. They have a very soft mid-stroke support, so they work fairly well on some bikes and poorly to just plain bad on others.

    Your model of Enduro is a darned good one.

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