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  1. #1
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    XC vs. AM vs. FR/DH????

    Can someone set me straight here? At what point does XC turn into AM and AM turn into FR and then to DH? I can see how this can vary based on opinion, but is there a better way to understand this?

  2. #2
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    XC is what roadies do when they want to ride on dirt. AM is what downhillers do when they cant shuttle or ride the lift. DH is what you do when you have huge hairy balls and love to shred the gnar.

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    Nice

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    XC 100mm; AM 140mm; FR 180mm; DH 200mm.

    And all the other ranges blur the categories. The other main difference is the weight and durabillity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stillerwinter View Post
    XC 100mm; AM 140mm; FR 180mm; DH 200mm.

    And all the other ranges blur the categories. The other main difference is the weight and durabillity.
    I don't see many AM rigs with less than 150mm.

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    depends on the rider , what 1 person considers freeriding another might consider AM , it's all just mountain bike riding to me .

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    Quote Originally Posted by stillerwinter View Post
    XC 100mm; AM 140mm; FR 180mm; DH 200mm.

    And all the other ranges blur the categories. The other main difference is the weight and durabillity.


    XC 23lb
    AM 30lb
    FR/DH 30lb+

    you can make it more confusing and add a trail bike between XC and AM. lets give it 130mm of travel and 27lbs of weight.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by helidave View Post
    XC is what roadies do when they want to ride on dirt. AM is what downhillers do when they cant shuttle or ride the lift. DH is what you do when you have huge hairy balls and love to shred the gnar.
    Wait, wait....let me try....

    You are riding XC if you are wearing full spandex, you are riding AM if you have baggy shorts and some sort of proper spandex bike jersey, and you are DHing it if you are wearing baggy shorts and a cotton t-shirt or flannel.

    Or, maybe this....

    You are riding XC if you are wearing full spandex, you are riding AM if you think knee pads might come in handy, and you are DHing it if nothing short of a full face helmet and knee/elbow pads will save your ass if you crash.

  9. #9
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    nvm
    Try this: HTFU

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    XC is for serious cyclists who only care about climbing and being the fastest period. There are many very technical downhill sections in XC racing. XC bikes are generally lightweight hardtails with 3 to 4 inches of front travel.

    AM is more for overall fun. It involves climbing to earn your right to go downhill. AM bikes generally have 5 to 6 inches of front and rear travel, and are made tough for moderate jumps and drops.

    Freeride is more gravity oriented. It involves huge jumps, gaps, and cliff drops. Freeride bikes generally have 7 and above inches of front and rear travel.

    Downhill is strictly downhill riding as the name states. In downhill races there will be a few jumps but mostly high drops and extremely technical/rocky sections that only long travel bikes can accomplish. Downhill bikes can have 8 to12 inches of front and rear travel, and are the heaviest bikes of all classes.

    Out of all classes XC is the most physically demanding and toughest discipline.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    Out of all classes XC is the most physically demanding and toughest discipline.
    I would argue that statement....simply spinning is simply a leg burn and a dull one at that. Maybe you should ride with more of the huge hairy balls and a love to shred the gnar mentioned previously. A true total body workout....

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    XC is for serious cyclists who only care about climbing and being the fastest period. There are many very technical downhill sections in XC racing. XC bikes are generally lightweight hardtails with 3 to 4 inches of front travel.

    AM is more for overall fun. It involves climbing to earn your right to go downhill. AM bikes generally have 5 to 6 inches of front and rear travel, and are made tough for moderate jumps and drops.

    Freeride is more gravity oriented. It involves huge jumps, gaps, and cliff drops. Freeride bikes generally have 7 and above inches of front and rear travel.

    Downhill is strictly downhill riding as the name states. In downhill races there will be a few jumps but mostly high drops and extremely technical/rocky sections that only long travel bikes can accomplish. Downhill bikes can have 8 to12 inches of front and rear travel, and are the heaviest bikes of all classes.

    Out of all classes XC is the most physically demanding and toughest discipline.
    I'd agree on all of the above with the exception of the last statement. Its impossible to say which is the "toughest" because it varies greatly from rider to rider. Even physically demanding warrants a similar response, as one rider's definition of physically demanding is different from another's. I came to AM/DH riding from racing XC for years, and I found DH to be much more physically demanding. My body had been used to riding for miles on end-not maneuvering a 40lb monster down a track and trying not to break my ass in the process.

    I'm only making the point that one shouldn't be looked at as more or less 'tough'. We're all different.
    *Disclaimer-I've been dealing with an injury for the past month and haven't ridden my bike-I'm bored and looking to argue...Carry on...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor Lord of Thunder View Post
    I would argue that statement....simply spinning is simply a leg burn and a dull one at that. Maybe you should ride with more of the huge hairy balls and a love to shred the gnar mentioned previously. A true total body workout....
    Haha!!

    If you're getting tired going downhill then you shouldn't even be on a bike.

    I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this subject. My main style of riding is XC I train on week days, and I also own a Downhill bike that I ride on the weekends for fun. (A Santa Cruz V-10)

    I hardly ever break a sweat when I ride downhill, and be sure that I do shred the trails fast and hard. Of course I'm not that good of a downhiller since I only do it 2 days a week, but my point is that anyone can go downhill if they have their mind set to it and some bravery.

    However not anyone can go fast uphill. It takes real physical fitness and strength to be a good XC rider. On top of that most of the time an XC rider will be on a hardtail. You're going to sit there and tell me that riding a hardtail down rock gardens isn't a workout on your body?

    8 inches of travel makes a huge difference in the technical sections my friend.

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    this threads is so full of posturing it makes the jersey shore look like a weekend at camp Wanahawkaloogie.

    You pick at a bad forum to ask this in OP. This forum is more splintered as far as what distinguishes AM riding from other genres as the difference between genres itself. The lines between AM/XC/FR are thin depending on who you ask.

    Suffice it to say that XC is less jumping and drops, AM is some jumping and drops and FR is more and bigger jumping and drops but depending on who you ask it can also be XC as in World Cup XC racing, AM is red bull and FR is Wade Simmons.
    Try this: HTFU

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    Haha!!

    If you're getting tired going downhill then you shouldn't even be on a bike.

    I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this subject. My main style of riding is XC I train on week days, and I also own a Downhill bike that I ride on the weekends for fun. (A Santa Cruz V-10)

    I hardly ever break a sweat when I ride downhill, and be sure that I do shred the trails fast and hard. Of course I'm not that good of a downhiller since I only do it 2 days a week, but my point is that anyone can go downhill if they have their mind set to it and some bravery.

    However not anyone can go fast uphill. It takes real physical fitness and strength to be a good XC rider. On top of that most of the time an XC rider will be on a hardtail. You're going to sit there and tell me that riding a hardtail down rock gardens isn't a workout on your body?

    8 inches of travel makes a huge difference in the technical sections my friend.
    I hear what you're saying and I'm not jumping on the wagon with Thor, but I don't think you can say that one is 'tougher' than the other. Like I said, I come from an XC background too and used to ride 30 hours a week when I was racing, but I still think that Downhilling is harder on my body than XC ever was. Sure, legs would burn, lungs would ache, and my heart would want to pop out of my chest, but many more times I've been sore and stiff after a weekend of riding lifts-more than I ever was from XC.
    'Tough' is in the eye of the beholder. To say one discipline is truly harder than another just ends up in a pissing contest.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    Haha!!

    If you're getting tired going downhill then you shouldn't even be on a bike.

    I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this subject. My main style of riding is XC I train on week days, and I also own a Downhill bike that I ride on the weekends for fun. (A Santa Cruz V-10)

    I hardly ever break a sweat when I ride downhill, and be sure that I do shred the trails fast and hard. Of course I'm not that good of a downhiller since I only do it 2 days a week, but my point is that anyone can go downhill if they have their mind set to it and some bravery.

    However not anyone can go fast uphill. It takes real physical fitness and strength to be a good XC rider. On top of that most of the time an XC rider will be on a hardtail. You're going to sit there and tell me that riding a hardtail down rock gardens isn't a workout on your body?

    8 inches of travel makes a huge difference in the technical sections my friend.
    This post is so ignorant I do not know where to begin.

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    This thread needs a "like" button...

  18. #18
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    XC: More uphill than downhill
    (Trail: Sort of like XC but with more jumps and downhill)
    AM: Even amount of uphill and downhill
    FR:Balls to the wall crazy lines and throwing 360s in lines
    DH: Bike parks, downhill courses, (as for bikes, slacker and longer wheelbase than a freeride bike)


    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    This thread needs a "like" button...
    There is at the very top
    Ruder than you.
    Ska is not dead!

  19. #19
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    I'm new here, but here's how I see it....... XC beat their chest to say they are the best, while AM beat their chest to say they are best, while FreeRide/DH dudes are friggen nuts on the videos, but the ones who aren't beat their chest to say they are the best.......

    Get on your bike, if what you like to ride is harder on the bike you have, get one that works better for it......and when you find your bike, and your mountain, then that is your "all mountain" bike........and you can beat your chest that it's the best!!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    nvm
    I know you just said never mind.... but I've had this type of response on this forum more than once now and I've only been a member for a week. So I have to say, this questions is more of an opinion question that could be asked a million times over. Especially considering the way sports like this evolve. That's the whole reason I asked it. To be honest, I think it's impossible to truly know where one of these disciplines stops and another starts. Just trying to get some wheels turning here. That's all man. It's just not as simple of a questions as, "...how do I tighten my chain?".

    I understand the whole "...use search and read before you comment" frame of mind, but only if the question asked were a tech question or something that's obviously fore straight forward. If I looked up every previous post that mentioned anything close to what I wanted to discuss that asks people opinion on something, then how would I ever be able be able to start my own thread with a subject/hook line that I feel would get more views and responses. Just a thought...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by digthemlows View Post
    I'm new here, but here's how I see it....... XC beat their chest to say they are the best, while AM beat their chest to say they are best, while FreeRide/DH dudes are friggen nuts on the videos, but the ones who aren't beat their chest to say they are the best.......

    Get on your bike, if what you like to ride is harder on the bike you have, get one that works better for it......and when you find your bike, and your mountain, then that is your "all mountain" bike........and you can beat your chest that it's the best!!
    You win. Lol! That is about as close as I think this question can be answered... but what do I know? My awesome "Rep Power" is only a zero....

  22. #22
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    ...funny thing is, nobody's got to beat their friggin chest. Just tell us what you think the different disciplines are to you. That's all. Pissing matches on an online forum.... really? come on...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Urb-dirt View Post
    I know you just said never mind.... but I've had this type of response on this forum more than once now and I've only been a member for a week. So I have to say, this questions is more of an opinion question that could be asked a million times over. Especially considering the way sports like this evolve. That's the whole reason I asked it. To be honest, I think it's impossible to truly know where one of these disciplines stops and another starts. Just trying to get some wheels turning here. That's all man. It's just not as simple of a questions as, "...how do I tighten my chain?".

    I understand the whole "...use search and read before you comment" frame of mind, but only if the question asked were a tech question or something that's obviously fore straight forward. If I looked up every previous post that mentioned anything close to what I wanted to discuss that asks people opinion on something, then how would I ever be able be able to start my own thread with a subject/hook line that I feel would get more views and responses. Just a thought...

    that is why i changed my post to read nvm. I posted then hit search and realized there was no coherent results. Not that this will give you any other solution either. The fact of the matter is the lines are subjective based on your location and when you started riding.

    Here in arizona almost every trail is an AM trail. Large technical descents and climbs, jumps, drops and alternate big move lines. Yet a lot of people ride XC bikes, they just walk the stuff they don't want to ride.

    Since i began mountain biking before the advent of suspension but have ridden everything from XC race FS to FR FS bikes I find myself most comfortable on a rigid bike. However i ride all the big move lines and the trails that those on the 6" dually bikes ride. I have been told that I am not an AM rider because my bike doesn't match the marketing term AM but in my opinion AM is what you ride. All the Mountain. Up down, big lines, fast single track and bumps and jumps. XC is all about Cross Country, trails that sinewy on singletrack are fast, tacky and allow you to maintain an really good heartrate. FR is all about abandoning the trail or the paradigm defined by the word trail and reinterpreting terrain for your riding pleasure. Fall lines, trees, stumps, gaps etc. Riding free of the constraints of a trail.

    From your other posts you definitely fit into the AM realm but you are also in the DJ/Street realm. You are most definitely not XC nor is your bike suited for FR, even if your skills are.

    Most will disagree with me on this forum regarding the above but that is the beauty of the internet. Opinions from all.
    Try this: HTFU

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    Haha!! If you're getting tired going downhill then you shouldn't even be on a bike.
    Careful there....spandex is squeezing all the blood into your brain and you're not thinking clearly....

    I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this subject. My main style of riding is XC I train on week days, and I also own a Downhill bike that I ride on the weekends for fun. (A Santa Cruz V-10)
    Why are XC geeks all about "training" and "number of days" and "miles" and "average speed"....sounds stressful to worry about. Oh, and a fancy bike doesn't equate to a competent rider....

    I hardly ever break a sweat when I ride downhill, and be sure that I do shred the trails fast and hard. Of course I'm not that good of a downhiller since I only do it 2 days a week, but my point is that anyone can go downhill if they have their mind set to it and some bravery.
    Try pedaling as you ride downhill instead of coasting....you'll be sure to break a sweat....I thought you XC kids were all about speed and efficiency?

    However not anyone can go fast uphill. It takes real physical fitness and strength to be a good XC rider. On top of that most of the time an XC rider will be on a hardtail. You're going to sit there and tell me that riding a hardtail down rock gardens isn't a workout on your body?
    Lame....I pedal a 35 pound 9 speed bike up 3000 foot ascents faster than most of my buddies on XC bikes. And, if you can't finesse a hardtail at speed through rock gardens, well, maybe you haven't been spending enough time riding technical trails....or, maybe you shouldn't be....on....a....bike?

    8 inches of travel makes a huge difference in the technical sections my friend.
    Agreed, but I thought you XC kids were all about speed and efficiency (deja vu)....so why aren't you riding downhill again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Addict View Post
    Haha!!

    If you're getting tired going downhill then you shouldn't even be on a bike.

    I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this subject. My main style of riding is XC I train on week days, and I also own a Downhill bike that I ride on the weekends for fun. (A Santa Cruz V-10)

    I hardly ever break a sweat when I ride downhill, and be sure that I do shred the trails fast and hard. Of course I'm not that good of a downhiller since I only do it 2 days a week, but my point is that anyone can go downhill if they have their mind set to it and some bravery.

    However not anyone can go fast uphill. It takes real physical fitness and strength to be a good XC rider. On top of that most of the time an XC rider will be on a hardtail. You're going to sit there and tell me that riding a hardtail down rock gardens isn't a workout on your body?

    8 inches of travel makes a huge difference in the technical sections my friend.
    Im not a downhiller but i do a local downhill track every once in a while. your obviously must be doing easier downhill trails, or not competing times with good riders. your riding fast; but fun fast. start riding competitive fast on scary trails with big ass rock drops and double doubles you have to jump. And put up times like the locals who kill it and that is not easy by any means. the **** is like straight up supercross without an engine. in perspective isnt that what you do in xc? try to be the fastest on a given trail. take that logic to the downhill trails against other downhill riders and i bet it is no longer the easiest discipline. unless your a very talented and trained adrenaline junkie its probably a more difficult discipline. the locals i know compete using strava gps app on android, or i phone.
    Last edited by akiracornell; 05-03-2012 at 10:35 PM.

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