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  1. #1
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    Will vintage mountain bikes go up over the years?

    I have a 1990's specialized hardrock. There are some scrapes on the bike that have rusted by now, and the rear derailleur broke along with slightly bending part of the frame where it attaches.

    Should I keep it as is, restore it, or sell now?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by John445 View Post
    I have a 1990's specialized hardrock. There are some scrapes on the bike that have rusted by now, and the rear derailleur broke along with slightly bending part of the frame where it attaches.

    Should I keep it as is, restore it, or sell now?
    I would not keep it as an investment. If you don't want to ride it or keep it for sentimental reasons sell it. Invest the money in a low cost total market ETF. 10yrs from now you'll have a lot more money to spend than if you had kept the bike to sell at that point and you won't have to store it for the next 10yrs.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  3. #3
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    Prob not, they peak and trough. You can make money on the right spot, but long term people lose interest, too old t ride etc. Every vintage market goes through it, excepting vintage autos
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "Loud hubs save lives!"

  4. #4
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    If you like riding it I'd keep it. It's worth little today and will be worth less tomorrow.

    It's like an old typewriter or other dated piece of mass-produced tech. It will be so out of date soon that few would be interested in actually using it, new parts will be hard to find and there are too many out there for collector value to be much. Just doesn't stack up for it I'm afraid.

    I had one as well, gave it away.

  5. #5
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    a vintage Hardrock is a cheap bike from an era of crappy mountain bikes. Good disposable commute bike, that's it.

    There's a few historically interesting old mountain bikes that will hold their value, but a hard rock isn't one of them.

    sorry! ride it and don't worry.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #6
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    At a time when the bikes were all the same shape and the quality was proportional to price, the Hardrock was the third or sometimes fourth rung frame making it the twelfth or fifteenth bike in the lineup. Seldom were the tubes butted, sometimes they were chromoly, later they weren't. It will work fine if you maintain it and you can upgrade it if you want, but it's not a collectible.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the 2 cents.

    I'll sell the bike while I can now.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by John445 View Post
    I have a 1990's specialized hardrock. There are some scrapes on the bike that have rusted by now, and the rear derailleur broke along with slightly bending part of the frame where it attaches.

    Should I keep it as is, restore it, or sell now?
    If it was unused in perfect condition, it would be. Just like if someone found a 30 year old car in perfect condition that had been preserved. If not, then it's just a used bike.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
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    I assume the same would go for the 1970 Schwinn Varsity I had in the past. The brakes were broken, and the paint didn't look real good anymore.

    Sold that bike for $20, I hope I didn't miss out on making much more.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John445 View Post
    IShould I keep it as is, restore it, or sell now?
    No mass produced bike will go up in value.

    If it has some kind of significance, for example if you own the V10 that Peaty finally won the worlds on, one of the original Tushingham B-52s or a 1988 Kona Explosif Mk1 in showroom condition, they might be worth a little more than the original retail, maybe. I wouldn't expect any of them to go up enough to outrun inflation like a classic car might.

  11. #11
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    No.

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