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  1. #1
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    why no love for high (2") riser bars?

    Why is it that most people seem to run low rise bars? I don't see anyone running 2in rise bars, is there a reason for that?

  2. #2
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    They're really really tall..

    More guys are moving towards more travel, with a 160mm fork you're already up pretty high, a flatter bar keeps you in a more neutral position. Even 140's get you pretty upright. Having a big fork and huge tall bar means you really gotta fight the bike to keep the front end down on climbs.

  3. #3
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    Agreed. Plus with dropper posts on the scene, this geometry shift is even more drastic. The low rise bars just seem to put me in the perfect position.
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  4. #4
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    When I used to run a high rise bar I would have to really
    tighten down the bar clamps to keep them from rotating
    on "heavy" hits. Now that I run mostly low rise carbon bars
    I can't/don't need to tighten them so much.
    I also agree with the other posters reasonings.

  5. #5
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    all those reasons above plus they look sort of lame.
    "Single track is for pansies!
    I blast down a mountain once, and in my wake, lies a new single track for the rest of you."-sm

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KVW View Post
    all those reasons above plus they look sort of lame.
    Yeah, I didn't want to go there! lol

  7. #7
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    All of these are true, but consider the fact that even a lot of DH racers run flat bars; you know that they're not climbing.

    Biggest thing though is that it gets you in a more aggressive stance with a lower center of gravity. Lower center of gravity = more stability whether you're climbing or descending.
    Go ride your bike.

  8. #8
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    I run Sunline V1s 745mm wide with a 38mm rise (1.5 inches) and it feels just right on my bike right now. My bike's only got 120mm travel though.

  9. #9
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    The more difficult to get weight on the front wheel.

  10. #10
    SamIAm
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    i want more 50mm 29+ bar choices. only ones right now are deity and answer.

    i AM a tall rider. and most all of it is in my legs so seat has to be higher. would like bars up a bit so i dont have to crank my neck so much.

    no taller than 60mm. 40-50mm juuuust right for alot of us.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  11. #11
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    All boils down to individual preference and riding style....
    Gone thru a whole slew of bar isn the past few years. Was comfy with a 710 mid rise for a long time but then gone on to try just about eberything out there as some of my ridies got bigger descents and i find the leverage lacking....

    Changes including long flat 760, all the lo-rise in various lengths... Now Im back on a mid 30mm rise... but length has gone up as well to 750mm. Best compromise for everything up, down and in the air....

    The inportant thing is keeping bar height the same when changing bars.. that way one less variable to deal with.. It gets tough as travel gets longer and the one way is to start off with a frame that has as short a headtube as possible and u have some spacers underneath the stem. Im lucky in that sense that my frame allows that kind of options as I progress and try out diff length and rise of bars + stem combos.

    Having said--even if bar height and all are kept constant-- climbing is just not as nice as the rise increases... but what works against the climbing is compensated with stability during air time for me.. flat and lo rise just seem to twitch a lot more when pop off something on the trail..

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamL3227 View Post
    i want more 50mm 29+ bar choices. only ones right now are deity and answer.
    FUNN Fatboy 750mm length 50mm rise

    I've done the low rise thing & really didn't work for me. Kinda think it's more a fashion thing. Run whatever feels good.
    Last edited by Bordershy; 02-17-2012 at 07:53 AM.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamL3227 View Post
    i want more 50mm 29+ bar choices. only ones right now are deity and answer.

    i AM a tall rider. and most all of it is in my legs so seat has to be higher. would like bars up a bit so i dont have to crank my neck so much.

    no taller than 60mm. 40-50mm juuuust right for alot of us.
    I was interested in this thread for the reason you stated here. While I am not tall, I think my legs are for my height. I have very wide shoulders and my arms are short for my height. I recently changed sizes in bikes to fit me better, but in the process it dropped my stack height and in turn dropped my bars away from my short arms. Now when I ride, my lower back is killing me and I really have to torque my neck to look down the trail. I bought some 40mm rise bars. I know climbing will suffer, but climbing already suffers when my lower back is in pain. Right now I'm worried that my new bike might not fit me.... but everything on it fits perfectly except for the fact I'm bending over to 'reach down' to my bars. Do you think riser bars would help this situation?

  14. #14
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    taller bar can address a physical issue like flexibility, stregnth or injury too. for me finding the sweet spot for tire grip and a little air time loft control is key as i get older. I pay attention to where my grips' height are and keep that constant on a set-up regardless of bar height.

    i run 38mm renthals right now slammed on 160s. It works well but my ride style is very bmx oriented with more standing and attacking things so i don't have any issues with the front end and climbing(boring!!haha!) i could care less about that. depends on the bike too for wheelies or when you're trying to manual and how responsive the rear set up is for doing those things.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kneetowaist View Post
    Why is it that most people seem to run low rise bars? I don't see anyone running 2in rise bars, is there a reason for that?
    Hi Mr. kneetowaist,

    I absolutely love my 50mm / 2 inch rise, 30.5" wide bars! Some folks speak of climbing issues when using a high rise bar. But I deal with that by using the TALAS feature on my fork to drop the front end on climbs.

    My riding style is all about finding something to jump onto, jump off of or jump over. Therefore I really appreciate the ability of the high rise bar to help me loft the front end of the bike with little effort!

    As far as I'm concerned anyone who knocks the high rise bars based on looks has a case of misplaced priorities!

    Here is a shot of my 2007 Specialized Enduro Pro after I tweaked it to perfection for me!
    why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-michaels-bike-032.jpg

    Take care,

    Michael
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  16. #16
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    I wonder how many people are running low rise bars with 20+ mm of spacers under their stem. I see it a lot. Does it defeat the purpose?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikedrd View Post
    I wonder how many people are running low rise bars with 20+ mm of spacers under their stem. I see it a lot. Does it defeat the purpose?
    Look at the previous picture in the above post. Looks like 25+mm spacers with a high rise bar. I guess what ever it takes for good fit/feel for the rider.

    My resaon for not using them (see post #4) is I don't trust them not to rotate on one of my "smooth" landings.

    And people that cut their steerer tubes to short...arghh!

  18. #18
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    so...

    deity, answer, funn, spank.


    and on the climbing issue. its not that hard to pull ur chest closer to the bars a bit on the steeper bits to keep the front end down.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  19. #19
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    50mm Answer AM's feel great! I had some low rise Easton Monkey Bars before, I was dubious about putting high rise on there but ended up being a great improvement, loads more confidence in the air and in the steeps. I like a playful bike

    FWIW I run 140mm forks, 50mm stem slammed to the headset.

  20. #20
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    Love mine no need to fight the bike , it climbs great for me paired with a 60mm stem 0 degree rise.

    Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-uploadfromtaptalk1329552262896.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hi Mr. kneetowaist,

    I absolutely love my 50mm / 2 inch rise, 30.5" wide bars! Some folks speak of climbing issues when using a high rise bar. But I deal with that by using the TALAS feature on my fork to drop the front end on climbs.

    My riding style is all about finding something to jump onto, jump off of or jump over. Therefore I really appreciate the ability of the high rise bar to help me loft the front end of the bike with little effort!

    As far as I'm concerned anyone who knocks the high rise bars based on looks has a case of misplaced priorities!

    Take care,

    Michael
    You couldn't have put it any better. I run a 160mm Talas and just flip the 120mm switch for steeper climbs.

    I just ordered those exact same bars from CRC on Monday, can't wait to get them on and give them the test. You running them at full width or cut down a bit?

  22. #22
    Johnny Dependable
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    No love for high riser bars? The hell you say. I'll ride nothing but. People can stick the low rise carbon bars up their momma's hoo ha, I'm keeping it old school bro! Hussefelt 31.8, 2" risers all day long, Joe Rogan podcast by night!

  23. #23
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    I find that a lower front end makes it easier to get the front tire to stick later in a ride when I get too lazy to weight the front.

  24. #24
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    Now that there are good wide flats out there, you can achieve the same bar position with a combo of spacers and stem, flat bars offer some advantages. Particularly it's easier to make a stronger, lighter, cost effective bar flat. They also give you the option of running a lower front end if you wish. This leaves me thinking that risers are purely a fashion statement at this point. Admittedly I still have a 750mm wide 20mm rise bar, but I see bars like this Kore as effective options if you can rise your stem/spacers and get over having a flat bar. Kore 800mm flat bar! The Earth isn't Flat! These bars are though! - Pinkbike.com

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    I find that a lower front end makes it easier to get the front tire to stick later in a ride when I get too lazy to weight the front.
    Tru Dat!

  26. #26
    Johnny Dependable
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    Quote Originally Posted by blcman View Post
    Tru Dat!
    Sounds like you boys need a heavier front end! =)

  27. #27
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    In my opinion, the front end handles very different with a short stack, 0 deg stem, and 2" riser bar than it does with a taller stack and flatter bar. Personally, I think the riser bar gives the bike much more a moto feeling that I'm comfortable with particularly in the air and maintaining control with the front end off the ground. Like the PP said earlier - a more playful bike.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBill View Post
    No love for high riser bars? The hell you say. I'll ride nothing but. People can stick the low rise carbon bars up their momma's hoo ha, I'm keeping it old school bro! Hussefelt 31.8, 2" risers all day long, Joe Rogan podcast by night!
    Running the same setup!(hussefelt and 2" answer 720am's)

    Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    You couldn't have put it any better. I run a 160mm Talas and just flip the 120mm switch for steeper climbs.

    I just ordered those exact same bars from CRC on Monday, can't wait to get them on and give them the test. You running them at full width or cut down a bit?
    Hi Mr. trojans,

    Sorry to take so long to respond to your question! I'm running them at full width on the Specialized Enduro Pro. The bars are 30.5" and the bar ends cost me an inch so the net width is 29.5". I'm also running these bars on my Santa Cruz VP Free I use for FR. I love those at the full width as well even though I don't run bar ends on that bike.

    Based on my months of experience using these bars on two different bikes I believe you'll love them! Please post back and let us know how it goes for you.

    Best of luck with your upgrade!!

    Michael
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  30. #30
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    Riser bars for sure! Not only is it much more comfortable on the back, years of riding moto make the riser bars feel like home. No problem with flex, and I can climb just fine.

  31. #31
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    Run what you like, who CARES what someone else thinks? Are THEY buying your gear?

    (Quick aside: I run my Coiler Supreme with a pretty XC setup, full extension on the post; trust me, that doesn't mean I don't make use of the bike! XC bikes don't last under me, even on COMMUTES! Too big/heavy, too much torque....)

    I'm loving my NC-17 risers, 1.5" rise, with an RF Evolve stem and a 5mm spacer.
    A bike is the only drug with no bad side effects....

  32. #32
    Axe
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    Not too long ago one would need to get riser bars if you want some reasonable 9+ deg sweep and good width. Nowadays, in some part due to 29r bikes, wide, swept flat bars are available to replace those 580mm 5deg jokes we had everywhere. Now I can ride and breathe at the same time!

    As far as spacers, risers etc. all that is individual fit. Nobody cares how you achieve it.

  33. #33
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    Riser bars allow you to get the front end up and over things a lot easier, but also allow the front end to pop-up a lot easier during a steep climb. They also do not allow you to get in the "best" power/attack position for a steep climb.

    They put you in a position w/ more weight over the rear of the bike. This is good for decents.

    For really technical slow and relatively flat or rapidly descending stuff, I kinda like risers. For faster/flowier more XC stuff with climbs, I much prefer a flat bar.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by kneetowaist View Post
    Why is it that most people seem to run low rise bars? I don't see anyone running 2in rise bars, is there a reason for that?
    A riser is just one element in determining how high your bars are going to be. The length of the fork, the length of the headtube, the spacers underneath the stem, the rise of the stem, and the rise of the bar all combine to give you the grip height.

    If you don't see many people running a riser, it is because the low rise, in combo with everything else I mentioned, give them the right grip height. Even if you want the bars really high, you might not need a 2" riser to get there.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  35. #35
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    So it was Saturday morning about a half hour from leaving for my favorite trail (San Juan Trail) when the postman knocked on my door with my new Spanks 777 i ordered from CRC last week (super fast free shipping - great job CRC). So what the hell I broke out the stand and did a pit crew style bar swap cause these things just looked too bad ass to just not put on.

    Coming from a 40mm rise MonkeyLite carbon I was already knew I liked the risers, but the extra width along with the 50mm rise just felt insanely good on this semi fast, bumpy, rutty trail. I love the moto like control I have particularly hitting an off-camber rut section at speed and feeling totally in control. As for climbing, that's what I bought a TALAS for, just drop it to 120 and wheel rises are a non-issue.

    I was planning on cutting these down to 747, but they felt sooo good at full width I might just keep them although you really have to pay attention in the tight sections with trailside boulders, trees, and bar grabbing vegetation. Nice job SPANK, great design.


  36. #36
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    I just bought the Azonic World Force 3" Riser Bar, I felt my stock 40mm bar was way too low.

    Now I can flip stem spacers around if I need it lower.

    It's hard to get any rise with the shorter stems, I'm running a 40mm with 0 degrees.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelsnead View Post
    Hi Mr. kneetowaist,

    I absolutely love my 50mm / 2 inch rise, 30.5" wide bars! Some folks speak of climbing issues when using a high rise bar. But I deal with that by using the TALAS feature on my fork to drop the front end on climbs.

    My riding style is all about finding something to jump onto, jump off of or jump over. Therefore I really appreciate the ability of the high rise bar to help me loft the front end of the bike with little effort!

    As far as I'm concerned anyone who knocks the high rise bars based on looks has a case of misplaced priorities!

    Here is a shot of my 2007 Specialized Enduro Pro after I tweaked it to perfection for me!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	michael's bike 032.JPG 
Views:	35877 
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    Take care,

    Michael
    The bar looks fine, but pls take off the boot of your GD, it will look alot better. I run my GD without the boot for 2yrs now, with no problem.

  38. #38
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    They take a while to get used to, you really notice all the dislikes mentioned in previous posts. But after you get used to them, a few things stand out.

    First, the more upright position gives much better visibility than being hunched down. Racers wouldn't gain from it, but I'm always looking for the next photo and I see a lot more around me with higher bars.

    They really shine on rough downhills, that's where a riser bar gives the bike a better feeling of being under full control. I really like mine.

    <img src="https://sites.google.com/site/webfiles9548/2012-05-19_0013.jpg">

  39. #39
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    Hey Mtn Man I totally agree with you on how the bike feels with risers, but try some that are a little wider too, I like the rise on yours but they look like they could be wider. I thought the really wide bar felt very odd at first but very quickly feels just as natural as the hi-rise and give you way better stability on steep techy sections. The way my rig is set up right now it feels like a big bmx kind of bike that just wants to be played with around logs, boulders, etc stuff that you can try to hop on/off or over. Much more of an overall "fun" factor while riding with a different cockpit.

  40. #40
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    I have tried some low rise bars on both my trail bike and FR bike and could not get used to the feeling like I was planted over the front tire. Part of it might be the flexibility, in that I feel it in my lower back, the other part, at least for me is the feeling that I am going to endo on the almost anything.

    No certain as to why some people believe having a rise bar hinders climbing. I have no problem with fire road types of climbs or technical climbs, including steep ups with steps and ledges.

    Yes, some DH racers use low rise or flat bars others don't. Try out a few different bar height and widths and keep what feels right for you.

    FWIW here is my setup on my trail bike. You can kind of make out the riser bar, I think it is a 40mm rise and 680 width.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-p1040437.jpg  


  41. #41
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    What no one has mentioned that's odd to me is their bar height relationship to seat height vs head tube height. That has a big impact on the riser height that might be used to get the desired relationship and also if your doing XC, AM or DH

    For me I like the bars about level with my seat or just a bit lower on my size large Prophet. To get that I use a 75mm Hope stem with a 25 degree rise, a 10mm spacer, and 40mm riser bars. I think my bike has a much lower head tube height than newer bikes so I need all that stem, spacer, and bar height to get it to seat level. I'm 6' tall exact.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kvw View Post
    all those reasons above plus they look sort of lame. :d
    qft

    I put a set on my old '95 XC bike that I now use for commuting, just to create a more comfortable "sit up and beg" cruising position. The bike used to have a classic old school XC lay-out: stretched out low over the front tire with narrow bars. This was good for attacking climbs and narrow singletrack. Bad for relaxed cruising.

    The riser bars look bad. A riser stem w/ a flat bar would have looked 10x better and accomplished the same thing. I have returned the bike to the trails a couple of times and the bars DO give more control on descents and make it easier to get the front end up. But the climbing position is worse.

    But at the end of the day, it's simply a matter of bike fit and what one likes in terms of bar vs seat height ratio. But just as a matter of aesthetics, If a "rise" is needed i'd use a different stem to bring flat bars up - NOT go w/ riser bars. They look awful.
    Last edited by Stumpjumpy; 05-30-2012 at 07:04 AM.
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  43. #43
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    Carbon

    Does anyone know if there is a carbon DH bar available with 740+ width and 40mm rise? I have been running risers for a long time and like the way they work for trail bikes. Made the mistake of putting a 750 Havoc and shorter stem on my big bike with 180mm fork. I really like the wide low rise bar for this application. It improves the handling at extremes, in air and feels better when standing and cranking. It is a good compromise with comfort in this case.

    Currently trying this combo on my smaller bike with 160mm fork. I like the width but would prefer more rise. I have 27 mm of spacers with the Havoc and cannot add any more. Liking carbon too much to give it up. I have been running the old Easton Carbon DH at 711mm wide and it is very close to perfect...I like risers on the trail bike for all of the reasons in previous posts. Comfort for my neck and better leverage on the front of the bike for lifting the front end.
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  44. #44
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    I was in the exact same dilema about 3 months ago and couldn't find anything in carbon that was wide and tall. I have the Easton carbon DH bars too that I really liked, but wanted wider. I went with the 50mm Spank 777 which isn't carbon, but I honestly don't even notice and love the bars - no regrets at all.

  45. #45
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    im running 40mm rise bars and its been the last thing I have done to get me in a better position. But the way I read this thread, it sounds like a different fork can raise the front end and change that. I have been wondering that actually. I have been thinking of replacing my stock cheap fork. I need to learn all about forks I guess.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomiclab View Post
    im running 40mm rise bars and its been the last thing I have done to get me in a better position. But the way I read this thread, it sounds like a different fork can raise the front end and change that. I have been wondering that actually. I have been thinking of replacing my stock cheap fork. I need to learn all about forks I guess.
    IMO your fork along with the right bar/stem completely dictates the way the bike feels, just make sure your head angle is appropriate for the fork you want.

  47. #47
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    Last week I put some 2" rise Gold Spank bars on my GT force 2.0. No gold was not my first color choice but it's what they had in stock. They actually look ok on a white bike but still not my first choice on color or even my second choice.

    I swapped my neck spacers around, so now it's basically about a 1.5" rise bar vs the 1" bars I had on, with all spacers under the stem. I will probablly put the spacer back to give them the full 2" rise.

    After I went over the bars a few weeks ago, I decided to sacrafice some of the climbing ability to get the ass end down more for decents, without having to use a dropper seatpost. If somebody comes out with a dropper that isn't total junk, I may pick one up someday.

  48. #48
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    I believe like everything else on our bikes that this is a personal preference. I'm 5'10" & ride a large Mojo HD. I've always liked the feel of a low rise bar with little to no spacers under the stem. When I drop my seat, I like the low feel this set up gives me!

    Stem 0 rise & bars 20mm rise x 750mm wide.


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  49. #49
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    I like to set mine up with the seat about an 1" or 2" above the bars. So it depends on the frame set to the size of the bar rise I use. I find that if the seat is above 2" I am leaning to far foward, less than an inch and I'm to much upright.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    IMO your fork along with the right bar/stem completely dictates the way the bike feels, just make sure your head angle is appropriate for the fork you want.
    Right, I was thinking of that. So, how do I "make sure" the head tube angle will be right?

  51. #51
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    i have two inch bars coz my steerer was shorter than ideal on my new frame.

    i like a little rise anyway. flat bars are so xc. you might as well wear lycra shorts

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    Sorry to drag up and old thread but I'm looking for a super high riser bar for a build I'm doing. I really want virtually a BMX type bar, though if it could be light weight and carbon than great. It also has to be 31.8 or 25.4. That that actually means that most BMX bars are out because they use 22.2


    The highest standard MTB carbon riser bar I've found is the Answer Protaper 720 with 50mm rise (2")

    why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-bars-carbon-720-am.jpg

    The highest standard bar I'd found is 100m (4") NS bar
    NS Bikes District Bars 2013 | Chain Reaction Cycles

    It is actually 22.2 but says it comes with shims. I just realized then if I can get shims it does open me up to using standard bmx bars.

    these bars are pretty light too with a 25.4 clamp and 75mm rise
    Deity Components Villain 3 Handlebar 2014 | Chain Reaction Cycles



    And Box has some BMX bars that have a 30.8 clamp. These come in 5.5" or about 135mm. But they are really heavy. » Maximus Handlebars | Box Components - Cycle Group Inc.


    I'd really like to try a carbon bar with 100mm rise if anyone spots one? But there may be a few options for aluminum too, especially if I can get ahold of some shims.

    I also just found this great UK page with some other high rise bars: Top 10 HandleBars

  53. #53
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    From what i know the rise on the bars are mostly looks, because you can achive the same handling by mixing around with rise on stems, or spacers under the stem.

    Not all forks are made for 50mm or more with spacers, but lets say you use 50mm of spacers and a 60mm stem with 30 degree angle, then you can use flat bars but you have achived to rise your upper body in a more upright angle to take weight of the front wheel.

    So by my logic it is most up to what you think looks the best. I guess it might be some difference in flex on flat bars and bars with rise, but not that it should make muvh of a difference.
    Go Big or Go Home

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merida OneFiveO880 View Post
    From what i know the rise on the bars are mostly looks, because you can achive the same handling by mixing around with rise on stems, or spacers under the stem.
    Sorry Merida, I'm going to have to disagree with this statement in a big way. Although you can achieve the same resting spot for your hands with combination of stem rises and spacers, you definitely do NOT get the same handling characteristics as you do with a taller riser bar.

    I can't explain all of the physics behind it, but I can tell you from years of experience and very many bar/stem/riser combinations that riser bar will feel very different than a hi-rise stem with shims.

    Give it a try and you will see what I mean.

  55. #55
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    Not gonna disagree with you.

    As i dont ride with more than 0,5" rise on my bars i cant say how higher bars feels like, but purly physics i dont see how it should make any difference if you gain hight from spacers,stem or bars.

    If you fit a toyota steeringwheel to a ferrari i guess its gonna "feel" different, but its gonna handle the same :-p Hehe i really dont know, guess i have to try me one of them 2" bars and see for myself.

    But then again, "feeling" can be just as good as anything else, even if its not an upgrade.
    Go Big or Go Home

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    Right on, yeah it seems to make sense that it would be the same since you can get your hands in the position, but how you get them in that position can make a big difference.

    It's amazing how small changes in the cockpit can affect the way a bike handles

  57. #57
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    Re: why no love for high (2") riser bars?

    I did not read this thread but I can guess on the tone of it. I run 2 inch Answer Pro Taper riser bars. Could care less if they look totally cool or totally stupid, your opinion of the aesthetics of my bike is completely meaningless to me. It just works for my current frame.

    I'm also in the market for a quality car, with high resale value and which comes with hi safety standards. The Subaru Forester is at the top of my list for my price point. Not very flashy and if it says Treehugger or old lady car to anyone else I could care less. That's not why I am interested.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merida OneFiveO880 View Post
    Not gonna disagree with you.

    As i dont ride with more than 0,5" rise on my bars i cant say how higher bars feels like, but purly physics i dont see how it should make any difference if you gain hight from spacers,stem or bars.

    If you fit a toyota steeringwheel to a ferrari i guess its gonna "feel" different, but its gonna handle the same :-p Hehe i really dont know, guess i have to try me one of them 2" bars and see for myself.

    But then again, "feeling" can be just as good as anything else, even if its not an upgrade.
    Physics would back up the notion that the handling would be the same regardless of how you get the grips where they are. My experience backs this up as well.

    That said, different handlebars (and stems) can feel different if you are sensitive to it, but this is true even of ones with the same width and rise.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  59. #59
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    Flat and lower rise bars "feels" longer. If you are pressing down and needing that leverage they are great. But going thru tight twisty stuff it can sometimes feel like having an oar with no space to meander..
    Higher rise have better control in these and watch the those WC DH races that are steep and gnarly... a lot of riders would swap to their higher rise bars and back to low rise on other less tech race course.

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    "Physics would back up the notion that the handling would be the same regardless of how you get the grips where they are. My experience backs this up as well"

    Seriously???

    So you are saying that a bike with a 70mm 1" angle rise stem + 1" of headset stack + flatbars will handle the same as 50mm no rise stem + no headset stack + 2" riser bars? Are you nuts?

    Same bike, but they would handle very different even though resting hand position would be nearly identical.

    Physics would actually tell a very different story. It all comes down to the amount of leverage the rider has over the opposing force of the front wheel. The pivot point of the shorter stem is lower and closer to the fulcrum (head tube/steer tube) providing significantly more leverage over a longer and higher stem with a flatbar.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    Physics would actually tell a very different story. It all comes down to the amount of leverage the rider has over the opposing force of the front wheel. The pivot point of the shorter stem is lower and closer to the fulcrum (head tube/steer tube) providing significantly more leverage over a longer and higher stem with a flatbar.
    The fulcrum is on an imaginary line that goes through the center of the the steer tube and extends infinitely from both ends of the steer tube, so IF if the hand position is the same (I'll take your word from that example that it is, I can not do the calculation myself because there is no angle given for the 70mm stem ), then the relationship to that fulcrum is also the same.

    The mistake you are making here is the same one that lead to power curve cranks.
    Last edited by kapusta; 03-17-2014 at 07:58 PM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  62. #62
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    why no love for high (2") riser bars?

    Quote Originally Posted by trojans1993 View Post
    "Physics would back up the notion that the handling would be the same regardless of how you get the grips where they are. My experience backs this up as well"

    Seriously???

    So you are saying that a bike with a 70mm 1" angle rise stem + 1" of headset stack + flatbars will handle the same as 50mm no rise stem + no headset stack + 2" riser bars? Are you nuts?

    Same bike, but they would handle very different even though resting hand position would be nearly identical.

    Physics would actually tell a very different story. It all comes down to the amount of leverage the rider has over the opposing force of the front wheel. The pivot point of the shorter stem is lower and closer to the fulcrum (head tube/steer tube) providing significantly more leverage over a longer and higher stem with a flatbar.
    Umm. No. The pivot is from the grip to the steerer. It only matters how they are connected for vibration absorption and such. Brush up your mechanics.

    Common mistake: look up Z-cranks discussion, so as not to repeat arguments.

    There are no exactly equivalent set ups as all flat bars have no upsweep. Slightly different hand position.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Umm. No. The pivot is from the grip to the steerer. It only matters how they are connected for vibration absorption and such. Brush up your mechanics.

    Common mistake: look up Z-cranks discussion, so as not to repeat arguments.

    There are no exactly equivalent set ups as all flat bars have no upsweep. Slightly different hand position.
    Just find a 40mm stem with some rise and youll be good.


    I reject the OP's premise and apparently so do many others . Theres plenty of lovefor high rise bars.

    <a href=http://s34.photobucket.com/albums/d141/mrpea9999/?action=view&current=0308140854e.jpg target=_blank><img src=http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d141/mrpea9999/0308140854e.jpg border=0 alt=></a>

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    Just find a 40mm stem with some rise and youll be good.
    Wut?

  66. #66
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    3" rise Black Market Bada Bing, older Race Face stem with 10 degree up rise, plus 1" of spacer...



    I understand that the flat bar thing has a look.... but to me it's all about your height and where your stance feels comfortable.

    I feel like having a taller front end helps me center my stance back, is better for declines and jumping. No OTB!


  67. #67
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    I'm rocking some riser bars ATM, and I love them. I went for the rise bars because my steerer tube length was too short to run spacers+the flat bars I have, so i invested in some 2" risers.



    Bike rides fantastic now, and looks fine imo.

  68. #68
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    why no love for high (2") riser bars?

    Spank spike 777's had them on my other bike and kept them for my RM altitude. I did one ride with the stock flat bar and pulled them. Makes the bike feel much like a dirt bike which I like. But I'm also 6'4" on a XL frame and a lot of wheelbase. For really really retarded steep stuff I stand anyways.

    I hope you have a big trunk... cause I'm gonna put my bike in it!

  69. #69
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    I just bought a 19" 2013 Jamis Dakar XCR Comp 29 that came with a 110mm/6* stem and 20MM rise bars. I am 6' tall and have had a 2 level lumbar fusion - plus I'm an old moto guy - so I just ordered a white 80mm 8* Answer Rove G2 stem, plus white Answer 2" Pro Taper Expert 720 bars to get me where I need to be on the bike........... Will post pics as soon as I can.

  70. #70
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    Last edited by D Bone; 04-12-2015 at 01:38 PM.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegallery View Post
    Sorry to drag up and old thread but I'm looking for a super high riser bar for a build I'm doing. I really want virtually a BMX type bar, though if it could be light weight and carbon than great. It also has to be 31.8 or 25.4. That that actually means that most BMX bars are out because they use 22.2


    The highest standard MTB carbon riser bar I've found is the Answer Protaper 720 with 50mm rise (2")

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bars-carbon-720-am.jpg 
Views:	9951 
Size:	97.1 KB 
ID:	876730

    The highest standard bar I'd found is 100m (4") NS bar
    NS Bikes District Bars 2013 | Chain Reaction Cycles

    It is actually 22.2 but says it comes with shims. I just realized then if I can get shims it does open me up to using standard bmx bars.

    these bars are pretty light too with a 25.4 clamp and 75mm rise
    Deity Components Villain 3 Handlebar 2014 | Chain Reaction Cycles



    And Box has some BMX bars that have a 30.8 clamp. These come in 5.5" or about 135mm. But they are really heavy. » Maximus Handlebars | Box Components - Cycle Group Inc.


    I'd really like to try a carbon bar with 100mm rise if anyone spots one? But there may be a few options for aluminum too, especially if I can get ahold of some shims.

    I also just found this great UK page with some other high rise bars: Top 10 HandleBars
    There are also the Azonic World Force Rizer bars, in 2" and 3" models. I'm considering the 3".
    "Geologic time includes now."

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by spirit4earth View Post
    There are also the Azonic World Force Rizer bars, in 2" and 3" models. I'm considering the 3".
    I've had a pair of the 2" for probably 5 years. I like them and would get them again.

    30mm of spacers doesn't look so wierd when the bottom spacer matches the headset and the rest are black.

    ...tall people problems...
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  73. #73
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    Re: why no love for high (2") riser bars?

    I'm rocking 3" risers... on my dirt jumper. That's a different beat though. I'm 6'3 and it's a tiny bike. The rise helps me get the front end down for landings and I'm not all crunched over when rolling around. Unfortunately my experiences with riser bars are only helpful for 6-7 seconds of an average mtb ride...

  74. #74
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    Center of Gravity. Havent seen it mentioned in the various pro vs. con arguments made thus far. May be minimal, but riser bars help lower C of G, the way I see it.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamL3227 View Post
    i want more 50mm 29+ bar choices. only ones right now are deity and answer.

    i AM a tall rider. and most all of it is in my legs so seat has to be higher. would like bars up a bit so i dont have to crank my neck so much.

    no taller than 60mm. 40-50mm juuuust right for alot of us.
    Here are some options.
    TORSION
    RIVERA

  76. #76
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    Hi/low rise handlebars are just one tool to help you get the optimal bar height/reach for a particular frame/fork/wheel/body geometry combination. The same person may have one bike that requires a high rise bar and another that requires a low rise bar. There are some problems that only a higher rise bar will solve - if you need to squeeze every last mm of reach out of a bike, running 0 headset spacers will put the handlebar the farthest out possible; at which point your only tool left to get the optimal height is handlebar rise.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    if you need to squeeze every last mm of reach out of a bike, running 0 headset spacers will put the handlebar the farthest out possible.
    What about just using a longer stem?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    What about just using a longer stem?

    That at may work in some cases, it depends on how far forward you want to move the bar; stems generally come in 10mm increments which can be way too much. Sometimes even 5mm is more then you want.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    That at may work in some cases, it depends on how far forward you want to move the bar; stems generally come in 10mm increments which can be way too much. Sometimes even 5mm is more then you want.
    With 10 mm increments, you are never more than 5mm from your "optimum" fit (which usually is a range greater than 10mm, anyway), and I am highly dubious of anyone that claims to be able to detect a 5 mm difference in stem length. Heck most people would be hard pressed to notice a 10 mm difference.

    And if they are that sensitive about 5mm, they are going to loose their minds trying to find a bar that fits right.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    With 10 mm increments, you are never more than 5mm from your "optimum" fit (which usually is a range greater than 10mm, anyway), and I am highly dubious of anyone that claims to be able to detect a 5 mm difference in stem length. Heck most people would be hard pressed to notice a 10 mm difference.

    And if they are that sensitive about 5mm, they are going to loose their minds trying to find a bar that fits right.
    5mm is huge to me. If you don't have the skills to feel that difference...well, that's on you.

  81. #81
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    10mm difference is enormous, and 5mm is huge.......... To me at least.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    5mm is huge to me. If you don't have the skills to feel that difference...well, that's on you.
    Well, i guess we can be whatever we like on the internet. I can can feel the difference taking the stickers off my fork. That's how skilled i am.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  83. #83
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    I think 'feels different' is a subjective thing. Even the definition is up for interpretation. I went from a 90mm to an 80mm stem. I couldn't tell the difference in the driveway. I left it but didn't get to ride the bike for about a week and half forgot that I had swapped stems with my road bike. After the first downhill section on the first ride I thought to myself "damn my bike feels dialed today! I'm in the zone!" but I didn't make the connection until halfway through the ride. Out of curiosity I swapped back to a 90 and it felt off again. Maybe real, maybe confirmation bias.
    Moving to a 50mm was immediately apparent in the driveway and the bike climbed like crap, but was amazing on the descents. Sadly I just couldn't get my cockpit sorted enough to keep the short stem. I think feeling 5mm is atypically sensitive, but in inclined to believe that 10mm is discernible to most.

  84. #84
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    Given that typical frame sizing is in 20 mm increments or around that, I would guess 10mm is about as fine grained as most people would care. On the same bike, I would distinguish 10mm. 5mm - unlikely.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Given that typical frame sizing is in 20 mm increments or around that, I would guess 10mm is about as fine grained as most people would care. On the same bike, I would distinguish 10mm. 5mm - unlikely.
    Yeah, I guess I could just tell 10mm. When playing with stems I can definitely tell practical differences between stems 15mm apart. 5mm, no way (I have a 45 and a 50 that I have swapped). I guess 10mm is around the smallest that I could see making a difference.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  86. #86
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    I currently own stems ranging from 40mm to 55mm in 5mm increments. 5mm can make a very large impact, especially on a downhill bike. 2.5mm of stem spacer can make all the difference when you're at the limit of acceptable range. If you don't know what you're looking for when you're adjusting you may not notice. The differences are felt most at the limits of your handling capabilities.

  87. #87
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    Still run 27" riser bars with about a 1.5" rise. Easton carbon. Considering I used to run 22" bars with barends back in the day, and swapping to 24" XC rider bars was a big change, these are pretty wide. I'd try out wider but we have a bunch of trees around here that I don't feel like smashing my hand into.

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    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    5mm is huge to me. If you don't have the skills to feel that difference...well, that's on you.
    A small rotation of the bars can change reach by several mms either way, so there's another way to fine tune.

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    Well as far as I am concerned I love my riser bars!

    why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-img_20150417_143420.jpg

    why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?-img_20150401_160046.jpg

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    I'm uncomfy on low-rise or flat bars....plus the high rise is much easier on my back

    I have high rise on all my bikes....
    Last edited by _rich_; 04-22-2015 at 04:03 PM.

  91. #91
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    Old thread, but +1.

    Quote Originally Posted by djjohnr View Post
    Hi/low rise handlebars are just one tool to help you get the optimal bar height/reach for a particular frame/fork/wheel/body geometry combination. The same person may have one bike that requires a high rise bar and another that requires a low rise bar.
    Also, there is a misconception stated here in a few places that any desired higher grip position / bar height can simply be achieved by adding stem spacers. Thus some earlier in the thread argue there is no point to riser bars (why not just get flat bars and put in spacers?)

    This is only true to an extent because at some point you run out of steerer tube. The top of your stem should technically sit 3-5 mm above your steerer tube to allow for enough stem purchase to be safe while giving enough room for the top cap to preload the headset bearings property. Thus your bar height adjustment is capped by the length of your steerer tube, and some bikes (older geo trail bikes) may then be left with bar rise as the final adjustable variable to get a higher grip position (assuming you don't want to run a long, angle CC stem). Older trail geo seems to favor a forward cross country style position where the grips are well below the seat at average for a given frame size. You may need spacers AND bar rise just to get the bars up to seat height if running a modern short 0 degree stem.
    Marin County, CA

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    Old thread, but +1.



    Also, there is a misconception stated here in a few places that any desired higher grip position / bar height can simply be achieved by adding stem spacers. Thus some earlier in the thread argue there is no point to riser bars (why not just get flat bars and put in spacers?)

    This is only true to an extent because at some point you run out of steerer tube. The top of your stem should technically sit 3-5 mm above your steerer tube to allow for enough stem purchase to be safe while giving enough room for the top cap to preload the headset bearings property. Thus your bar height adjustment is capped by the length of your steerer tube, and some bikes (older geo trail bikes) may then be left with bar rise as the final adjustable variable to get a higher grip position (assuming you don't want to run a long, angle CC stem). Older trail geo seems to favor a forward cross country style position where the grips are well below the seat at average for a given frame size. You may need spacers AND bar rise just to get the bars up to seat height if running a modern short 0 degree stem.
    I think it goes without saying that The recommend option to add more spacers comes with the condition that there is enough steer tube to do so.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I think it goes without saying that The recommend option to add more spacers comes with the condition that there is enough steer tube to do so.
    it doesn't appear that is common knowledge reading the thread. Thus wanted to add to the record to clarify for future readers. Leaving the correct amount of stem above the steerer tube is crucial.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
    Marin County, CA

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    why no love for high (2&quot;) riser bars?

    Quote Originally Posted by DriverB View Post
    it doesn't appear that is common knowledge reading the thread. Thus wanted to add to the record to clarify for future readers. Leaving the correct amount of stem above the steerer tube is crucial.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
    Keep in mind that a lot of people have spacers above their stems as well, thus allowing for more adjustment this way.

    And when the bike is new, you can make the steerer however long you want before you get the fit dialed in.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Keep in mind that a lot of people have spacers above their stems as well, thus allowing for more adjustment this way.

    And when the bike is new, you can make the steerer however long you want before you get the fit dialed in.
    Yes that is of course true, the point again is there is an upper limit that is a cap on how high you can go.

    Of course you can buy a new fork and steerer tube to go higher but most would simply opt for bar rise when spacers and stem are maxed out. Unless you love a flat bar.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
    Marin County, CA

  96. #96
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    I picked up some black 50mm Deity Bars today, they are from 2014 but are still brand new in the packaging.

    They are a negative of my old white Deity bars on a bike I had a few months ago.

    Sent from my SM-N9005 using Tapatalk

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  98. #98
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    My old DMR wingbars.. sold them a few weeks ago. They were nice bars but I they didn't suit any of my bikes.


    Sent from my SM-N9005 using Tapatalk

  99. #99
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    As you see, some say handling reasons, others say they look weird. For me 2 inch riser Spank bars made my cockpit perfect. So comfortable and same control over technical or high speeds. I hate feeling too forward.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by inter View Post
    The bar looks fine, but pls take off the boot of your GD, it will look alot better. I run my GD without the boot for 2yrs now, with no problem.
    I love the boots. I made a boot out of an old inner tube. All I've read on the webz is that muddy grit will destroy a dropper post, so I keep that sh!t off mine.

    It's as pertinent today as it was 5 years ago!

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