Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 116
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    I switched to a 2x10 on my Transition Covert 3 years ago, not knowing what I was getting into. It has worked amazingly well, I haven't missed my big ring a single time.

    Which leads me to... why is Santa Cruz and Ibis offering 3x10s on their XT Enduro/AM kits? Did Shimano build too many 3 ring kits and offer them at a good price or something?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,321
    I switched to 2x9 five years ago and wondered the same thing. If you're honest about your fitness level and gearing needs a double is all you'll need.

    A triple is one-size-fits all and is great if you have to travel a lot and are not sure how low of a low gear or big of a big gear you'll need.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Because there is no substitute for top end! I've ridden standard gears forever and the 110 5 bolt pattern until 2 years ago because I could finally get the gears I need. If you hang around long enough it will come back. I run a 24,36,46, and back in the mid 90's they went to micro drive, and now most 2 ring setups are a 24, 36 and bashring. It's like people forgot how to hammer and make their legs hurt, then singlespeeds came around then really light bikes to ditch the granny, then 29ers and 2x10 and every niche you could imagine and now you can get rings in a ton of sizes in 4 and 5 bolt and external bb cranks, having your cake and eating it too. Just my preference though, going mach speed pushing the big ring down technical downhills and getting pr's on strava with it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6
    Makes sense... I suppose I'm just happy to leave the last couple % of speed in the places where it's actually flat enough to need to pedal, yet fast enough to need that kind of gearing. Not having a bash guard must be a bummer though, I regularly hammer mine into stuff.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    248

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    What trails are you on that your spinning out on 36x11 gears? All I know is a 46t chainring would look like a taco after a few good downhill runs on my enduro. I have never wanted more gearing (on the high end) off road than what a 34t provides on my 1x10. Anyways...I have no idea why any mountain bike comes with a 3x10 setup, at least on anything with over 100mm travel.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    783
    3x10s are still around because people still want and buy them. Manufactures are running a business and as long as something sells they will continue to make it.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cerebroside's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    934
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker831 View Post
    What trails are you on that your spinning out on 36x11 gears? All I know is a 46t chainring would look like a taco after a few good downhill runs on my enduro. I have never wanted more gearing (on the high end) off road than what a 34t provides on my 1x10. Anyways...I have no idea why any mountain bike comes with a 3x10 setup, at least on anything with over 100mm travel.
    3x10 comes in handy if you ride road to get to the trail. I run 1x10/2x10 on my bikes, but it is definitely a compromise (at the high and low end).

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    372

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    So you can replace the big ring with a bash.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Yeah I still have 3x9 but still I could see taking off the granny at the point of 11-36 10speed but I like the top end. I may change later but here's my current setup. Not needing a bashring, I manual off stuff a lot. Not the lowest BB either but if you go fast enough you just fly off stuff hahahaha, I couldn't resist. I will put the EC lower cup on to get more slack, maybe a works or angleset too.Why are 3x10s still around?-imag1150.jpg

  10. #10
    CoolArrow
    Reputation: jhazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,398
    I have not used a 3x10 this century.

    Even in the 90's, I replaced the big ring with a Rock Ring (or, as we say today - Bash guard) and never really missed the top end. But on the trail, gaining speed isn't an issue... gravity usually does the work and I'm always figuring how to use less brake.

    Don't miss or need it - EXCEPT maybe for street commutes. But I try not to do that too much, tires cost too much!
    Airborne Flight Crew

    Jerry Hazard – website

  11. #11
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    Quote Originally Posted by jhazard View Post
    I have not used a 3x10 this century.

    Even in the 90's, I replaced the big ring with a Rock Ring (or, as we say today - Bash guard) and never really missed the top end. But on the trail, gaining speed isn't an issue... gravity usually does the work and I'm always figuring how to use less brake.

    Don't miss or need it - EXCEPT maybe for street commutes. But I try not to do that too much, tires cost too much!
    The original Rock Ring protected the big ring rather than replacing it.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fix the Spade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,705
    Quote Originally Posted by jungleb77 View Post
    It has worked amazingly well, I haven't missed my big ring a single time.
    There are people who like to mash along in the big chain ring on flat paths and roads. Plus 104bcd cranks are easy to fit bash guards to.

    Personally I went to bash gaurd and chain guide many years ago when a 44t chain ring left me needing stitches...

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,321
    Quote Originally Posted by suspman View Post
    Because there is no substitute for top end! I've ridden standard gears forever and the 110 5 bolt pattern until 2 years ago because I could finally get the gears I need. If you hang around long enough it will come back. I run a 24,36,46, and back in the mid 90's they went to micro drive, and now most 2 ring setups are a 24, 36 and bashring. It's like people forgot how to hammer and make their legs hurt, then singlespeeds came around then really light bikes to ditch the granny, then 29ers and 2x10 and every niche you could imagine and now you can get rings in a ton of sizes in 4 and 5 bolt and external bb cranks, having your cake and eating it too. Just my preference though, going mach speed pushing the big ring down technical downhills and getting pr's on strava with it.
    What technical fireroads are you descending that require a 46/11 gear to spin out. Thats a nice gear setup for my cyclocross bike but even the world cup DH bikes arent set up with that big of a big ring.

    It's like you dont know how to spin?

  14. #14
    CoolArrow
    Reputation: jhazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,398
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    The original Rock Ring protected the big ring rather than replacing it.
    Wow. You are absolutely right... for some reason I remember switching the big rings out
    Airborne Flight Crew

    Jerry Hazard – website

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    84
    I recently went from 3x9 (22/32/44) to 1x9 (28t):

    Why are 3x10s still around?-1x9.jpg

    So compared to the triple ring setup I basically lost 2 speeds at the low end and three from the top (just looking at gear-inch equivalents). Not much downside to that even on the road and it's a big improvement on trails as before I was constantly shifting between 22/32 rings.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    145
    Honestly, I bet a lot of it is marketing. Back in the day (90's) more gears was better, and having 21 was awesome and 24 was like the bling equivalent of running XXI today. I still get routinely asked by non-riders "Wow, look at that thing! How many gears does [I]that [I] have?" When I tell them it's 18, they get disappointed. I'm sure lots of newbs walk into bike shops with the same question, and sales people like to say "yep, this bad boy is rocking 30 gears"

    I do have one friend who is a die hard 3x9 rider and loves mashing the big ring on flats and downhills. He also rides more road than I do to access his local trails. To each his (or her) own, but personally I have never once wished for the big ring after swapping it for a bash a few years ago.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    674
    I have a hard time believing people when they say they run out of top end on a 2x10 setup - maybe they are racing down roads. But if they want to buy the big ring, not my business.

    I think 2x10 should be the norm though. 36x11 is a big enough gear for virtually anywhere. Heck, my DH bike runs a 34x11 top gear and it works fine for pedalling down jump runs at 40-45kmh.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Fix the Spade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,705
    Quote Originally Posted by LostBoyScout View Post
    I have a hard time believing people when they say they run out of top end on a 2x10 setup - maybe they are racing down roads. But if they want to buy the big ring, not my business.
    I used to live in the South of England and there were stretches of fire road where you could stay in the big ring and hammer along at 25mph for ten+ minutes at a time. Dead flat, smooth and straight (boring too). 44x11 and skinny tyres do work in some places, but now I'm back in the north I don't miss it!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    102
    I recently picked up a new santa cruz bronson and the bottom two spec'd models came with a 3x10 set up. I do not understand why as virtually everyone that buys the bike will be swapping it out. I think it is definitely a price point thing. I am now running 2x10 XT with no chain guide and have no complaints!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    146
    i always thought it was marketing... 27-speed (3x9) vs 18-speed (2x9)! more gears, more options, more numbers LMAO!!!

    i use 2x9 with bash guard btw.

  21. #21
    Demon Cleaner
    Reputation: Structure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    465
    I used 2x9 with bash in place of the third ring for a while and loved the setup. Recently bought a new bike with 2x10...love the smooth shifting, miss my lower gears and bash guard.

    What I really want(ed) was 2x10 with 24 and 36 rings and an integrated bash. Bike spec'ed with a 2 speed front derailleur and shifter...

    I like to spin, ride steep, and am weak. But have money to spend. Anyone listening?
    Bicycling is politics by other means.

  22. #22
    Zaf
    Zaf is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Zaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    486
    MATHS TIME!!!!
    36x11 gearing on a 29" wheel is still putting you at the 27km/h (about 17m/h) mark at a 60rpm cadence. Fair enough, that's not quite spinning out, but say you flinging it around at 90rpm, that's still clocking in at 40km/h (25m/h).
    I've gotten my Fuel EX in excess of 50km/h out on the trails in downhill sections, and that's got a smaller wheelsize which requires even more spinning to reach the same speeds as the 29er in the calculations there.

    Admittedly, that's sort of my max speed, an I am inclined to agree that for the most part, a lot of rider's don't make great use of the large gear range. But just because someone doesn't, doesn't mean others can't use those gears; some people prefer the larger shifts changes for the terrain they ride, some people ride terrain with sharp climbs that beg for a small gear that then plateau onto higher speed track that demand a higher gear.

    It'd be nice if people chose gears appropriate for both their riding style and their terrain, and didn't care about whether or not they're in vogue of their selection.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by Structure View Post
    I used 2x9 with bash in place of the third ring for a while and loved the setup. Recently bought a new bike with 2x10...love the smooth shifting, miss my lower gears and bash guard.

    What I really want(ed) was 2x10 with 24 and 36 rings and an integrated bash. Bike spec'ed with a 2 speed front derailleur and shifter...

    I like to spin, ride steep, and am weak. But have money to spend. Anyone listening?
    Is it 64/104bcd? If so, give RaceFace Turbine a look. They sell a 24/36/bash matching setup. I have and its great.

    When paired up with my 10x rear (11-36), I find I only max out on fire or paved roads at over 30mph (per GPS).

  24. #24
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    Depends on the terrain and your riding style.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ti-triodes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by WV_XCE View Post
    So you can replace the big ring with a bash.

    +1

    That's what I did!

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by cerebroside View Post
    3x10 comes in handy if you ride road to get to the trail. I run 1x10/2x10 on my bikes, but it is definitely a compromise (at the high and low end).
    Bingo, thats the reason why I still ride a tripple. I could get a double like 28x40 but then Id probably miss a smaller granny.

  27. #27
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    7,939
    People buy it, it sells... nothing more to say. Some people can use it.

  28. #28
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    ^$20?

    Products
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,036
    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    It'd be nice if people chose gears appropriate for both their riding style and their terrain, and didn't care about whether or not they're in vogue of their selection.
    ^^ This!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    31
    Riding to the trail is a big thing. Trails around here are pretty steep up and down, so 32/22 makes for a good 2x set up (or 32t for a 1x). But I live 4 miles from the trails, and it's pretty shameful to drive 4 miles to ride, so 44t comes in handy on the road. I've never found it to be much of a detriment on the trail. Yeah, I never use it, but it isn't like it kicks my cat, insults my wife, or steals my beer.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by bjorn240 View Post
    Yeah, I never use it, but it isn't like it kicks my cat, insults my wife, or steals my beer.
    If it did, which would you be most upset over?

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    What technical fireroads are you descending that require a 46/11 gear to spin out. Thats a nice gear setup for my cyclocross bike but even the world cup DH bikes arent set up with that big of a big ring.

    It's like you dont know how to spin?
    Spinning too fast in the dh tech makes it easier to get squirrelly. You can run the 46 and just have some torque to slowly pedal over bigger stuf and its faster than spinning then coasting over bouncy rough stuff.

    I like the feel more, but in Texas I wouldn't need more than a 42/11 ever. Colorado as a junior I rode a 48/12 and remember pedaling down a wide open section at purgatory on a hardtail and it just felt awesome to get a big gear grinding out at 60-70 rpm and getting bounced all over.

    If your on double try a bigger big ring and tell me you don't like it!
    believe in yourself! I believe in you!

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    664
    Anyone who says they're spinning in DH tech is using a very liberal interpretation of the term.

    Around here, the only reason anyone would have to use a big ring is to ride fire roads and in fact if you use a big ring on just about any local singletrack, it will become your bashguard after a ride or two. Our trails are typically low speed and very technical: The extra bit of clearance you get from not having a big ring outweighs the increases in top end that one affords. I'm running 1x10 with a 32 up front and 11-36 in the back and the only place I've ever spun it out was on a fire road. Horses for courses, though. If I was riding somewhere with fast flowy trails (like say, southern Ontario) I'd certainly want one.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,676
    Quote Originally Posted by jlmuncie View Post
    3x10s are still around because people still want and buy them. Manufactures are running a business and as long as something sells they will continue to make it.
    Bingo.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4,676
    Quote Originally Posted by wheatgerm View Post
    ^^ This!

    ^^^^That!
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  36. #36
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post

    Around here, the only reason anyone would have to use a big ring is to ride fire roads and in fact if you use a big ring on just about any local singletrack, it will become your bashguard after a ride or two. Our trails are typically low speed and very technical: The extra bit of clearance you get from not having a big ring outweighs the increases in top end that one affords.
    +1. IMO, riding trails where you can spin out a big ring is not mt. biking, it's cyclocross. Where I ride, all a ring 40T or more is good for is scraping rocks and getting caught on logs. Once you get rid of a big ring you rarely use and do not need, and experience good clearance over rocks, ledges and logs first hand, you will wonder why you ever had one in the first place.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Spin, hell, its all about putting the power down! Like Grizzy said, a big ring feels great. I have a local trail with singletrack at top, technical sections in the middle and a long rock garden towards the end and then opens up a little at the end. I just like to be able to stand on the gears in between sections, its amazing how much work you can manage to get done in a short distance. Yes I could let gravity do the work but it takes too long. I'm not spinning out the 46 but it forces me to go faster when I'm tired and going for a PR. I only use a 24, 36 on my freeride/dh bike 9 speed and its good mostly. But if you think about it, it makes sense to pull bigger gears on a lighter bike that has less mass to accelerate. Also, in a choppy flat section, the big ring has less effect on suspension i.e. less torque and your mass bouncing around is wasted motion in a smaller spinning gear(if you aren't seated). Try it you'll be addicted.

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    This a question I ask myself, as I still have one mtb that has a triple ring crank. I have not used the granny ring in several years, and with my new 29er being 2X10, I'm definitely liking that. Most of my rides in coastal San Diego I've been doing on my single speed, anyways. I only really need multiple gears when I get out to the mountains in our east county, which currently happen to be on fire.

    Who knows... maybe in a week or so the whole place will be single speed heaven. I sure hope not.

    That said, I don't see anything wrong with having a triple crank. If that's what you want, I really got no problem with that. There's bigger fish to fry.

  39. #39
    Downhill fan
    Reputation: #Cyclelife's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    316
    I trashed my 3x8 w/(11-30 cassette) for a 1x9 36T (w/ 11-32 cassette) and will never look back. I ride hilly, rocky and rooty technical stuff mostly and though the 36T took a little getting used it made my legs stronger and me a better ride. 3x8/3x9 is a waste now a days I think. To each their own but there's my preference.
    I'm thinking about shreddin' it up right now!
    Giant Glory DH (custom)
    K2 Evo 4.0 FS XC (custom)

  40. #40
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    I plan on doing some occasional endurance races on my Chromag Rootdown, so the big ring is useful is those situations. If it wasn't for those races once or twice a year I'd go with a double... With that said, I'm not really competitive so I could do without the big ring I guess.

    What I would really like is a 9 teeth small sprocket on the cassette, something like a 9-34 would allow a very good range on a double (24-36 front rings). Only Hope have that kind of range on their home made cassettes/freewheels that fits only their hubs. XD1 with it's 10 teeth is a good start however but they should have gone one step further given they are creating a new standard anyways.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    50
    I think its still around from a product position/upsell tool. just about every bike at a LBS is a triple below $1,800, if you want a double you have to upgrade to a higher spec version or model. They can sell the person on weight, simplicity and efficiency over the triple.
    And yes, triples are still on some higher end bikes, but that seems to be diminishing every year.

  42. #42
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    MATHS TIME!!!!

    It'd be nice if people chose gears appropriate for both their riding style and their terrain, and didn't care about whether or not they're in vogue of their selection.
    Riding style, terrain, strength and fitness

    I ride bash/30/22 on my 29'er 10 speed XC bike with 11-36 in back. Don't need higher gear than 30:11 ever (don't race, don't take my mtn bikes on the road). 22:36 will get me up a telephone pole.

    My 650b 1X10 trail bike is 30T (Wolftooth) up front and 11-36 in back Would prefer bigger low cog and someday will get a 39 or 40T. 30:36 lowest gear on this 30lbs bike can hurt me after a long hilly day.

    I know my limits and don't ride to impress anybody except myself.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Yeah I like the 1 x 11 but it still too is a reduced overall range. I think a 30/40 with the XX1 or XO1 might be a cool option for me. But then its 2 x 11, haha! Oh well I just do math and know what feels good for me if I could get a light 11-36 0r 11-38 9spd that could be a way to ditch the granny gear. And of course the 10 or 9 tooth cog would be helpful for biggest ring increase ground clearance too(smaller big ring). Another thing to consider is the mass gained at the rear axle with more bigger cogs and no front der. but that is sprung-weight so taking weight off the axle would be the better way to go to get the bike to rotate better and follow the terrain better with less mass.

  44. #44
    One Gear
    Reputation: .40AET's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,063
    They'll be around for a while. Dealers still have leftover stock with 3x in inventory. Road bikes have been phasing 3x rings for years and they just won't die.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,378
    if you want to go fast down a road, nothing compares to the big ring.

  46. #46
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by tim208 View Post
    if you want to go fast down a road, nothing compares to the big ring.
    Gravity helps. 42 vs 36 is just about 15% higher cadence. One gear worth.

    On the other hand this: Calf meet chainring.

    I do not want to ride without a bash (or single front ring).

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    157
    When people can´t accept that the bigring is usefull they have to refer to fear as the ultimate argument. Its not just 15% but the difference between going from 23mph to 27mph at 90 RPM. For people that ride asphalt/dirt to get to the trail that makes a difference, it sucks to spin out when you are trying to hit the trails fast.

  48. #48
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Liternit View Post
    When people can´t accept that the bigring is usefull they have to refer to fear as the ultimate argument.
    Safety is a pretty good argument. I do not want my legs cut up 20 miles away from trailhead just so I could maintain 25+mph on fat knobby tires when on flat pavement. Which I can't do anyway for any meaningful length of time.. 36t front is good enough for world cup XC and DH racers.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Cut up? Really, are we kids just learning to ride, no! There have been decades of un cut up riders, not buying that argument either. I think most riders fall into the categories of spinners or power riders. I am big, and a power rider. I choose to use my BMX background as a kid powering a 44/46 to an 18/20 on a 20" wheel setup. I don't just cruise in between obstacles either. To each their own. And if you see me on the trail point all you want at the mostly extinct big ring. "Hey there's a sighting of an endangered species."

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    157
    professionals dont ride their bikes to competition and have setups for each course. There is safety and unsubstancied fear. There are far worse accidents than some calf cuts yet we ride bikes. Just accept some people have use for bigrings.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation: traffic002's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by db_8 View Post
    i always thought it was marketing... 27-speed (3x9) vs 18-speed (2x9)! more gears, more options, more numbers LMAO!!!

    i use 2x9 with bash guard btw.
    I think there is still quite a bit of marketing. 27sp sounds better than 18sp. And I run a 1x9...on both my mountain and my road (commuter) I run a 2x10 on my carbon fiber road bike.

    My 39/11-34 is awesome for commuting. Yeah, you have to coast on anything more than a moderate dowhill. But who cares. I'm not TT-ing it into work.

    I do leave my granny ring on my crankset though (no FD) in case I have to do an epic or near epic ride that involves 1+hrs of straight climbing... I just adjust my chain guide and drop the chain down manually with fingers. Once at the top, I put everything back into place on the middle ring (32t)
    Just get out and ride!

  52. #52
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    Quote Originally Posted by Liternit View Post
    When people can´t accept that the bigring is usefull they have to refer to fear as the ultimate argument. Its not just 15% but the difference between going from 23mph to 27mph at 90 RPM. For people that ride asphalt/dirt to get to the trail that makes a difference, it sucks to spin out when you are trying to hit the trails fast.
    As I've already posted, for people that don't ride roads or fire roads on their mtb, a big ring is a useless distraction, that scrapes rocks, ledges and rocks. Nothing to do with fear; everything to do with function. It's not like I didn't ride for 20 years with a big ring before I ditched it for good. Once I quit racing, I just didn't use it much or need it, and was sick of it holding me back in rocks and ledges.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  53. #53
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by suspman View Post
    Cut up? Really, are we kids just learning to ride, no! There have been decades of un cut up riders, not buying that argument either. I think most riders fall into the categories of spinners or power riders.
    Quote Originally Posted by Liternit View Post
    professionals dont ride their bikes to competition and have setups for each course. There is safety and unsubstancied fear. There are far worse accidents than some calf cuts yet we ride bikes. Just accept some people have use for bigrings.
    Bollocks. It is not unsubstantiated and it is not fear. Having a 15% higher highest gear - not worth it for hanging off rocks or bleeding out far away in the boondocks. Yes, sure I accept that some people like to ride pavement. Good for them. I happily got rid of big rings after some twenty years of riding with them. Yeah, maybe I spun out a few time. Don't miss hanging on logs though.

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    157
    Just let it go you are out of arguments

  55. #55
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by Liternit View Post
    Just let it go you are out of arguments
    Indeed. No further arguments are needed.

    Name:  OverYourHead.PNG
Views: 313
Size:  1.6 KB

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    437
    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Bollocks. - not worth it- bleeding out far away in the boondocks. .
    That is pure drama queen material there.

    I do agree not having is option for some, and having it is good for others.
    Nobody in my area gets stuck "hanging off rocks" nor have I seen any body stuck on logs, I know it happens, just not often enough to be a concern. So maybe, the area people live in will dictate what they do.
    Also, marketing or not, you who buy a bike, then go aftermarket rings, well, your keeping that machine rolling along just fine. There is no reason for the manufacturers to change as you buy as is, then buy more.

    For now, my fitness says keep it.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    942
    my trail bike is 2x9 32/22. the grades on my trails are steep and technical enough where 32-11 is plenty. simpson park hemet ca. But i rode a trail in fullerton a few weeks back where some spots it wasn't nearly enough. on strava the kom for the fastest dh section is 32mph. its bumpy and rutted. quite thrilling actually. but those trails also had no need for a 22. maybe one climb.
    I actually put some road slicks on my hardtail and converted it to my road workout bike. I actually started spinning out slightly in 44-11 on slightly downhill grades. 48 or 52 is what you need for any thing over 25mph to pedal. so it really depends on what your riding. if my trails had more long fire roads and I was also doing some of my super steep longer climbing; I could use a triple. but not needed for my local trails.


    ps. mormon downhill in the fullerton loop can not be done @ 32mph on a cyclecross bike. theres a few stairs right in the middle of it that would send a cyclecross bike bucked.
    Last edited by akiracornell; 07-11-2013 at 05:58 PM.

  58. #58
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by 1362 View Post
    That is pure drama queen material there.
    Courtesy of jeffh:

    Name:  IMG_1451.jpg
Views: 322
Size:  25.7 KB

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StuntmanMike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    679
    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    +1. IMO, riding trails where you can spin out a big ring is not mt. biking, it's cyclocross. Where I ride, all a ring 40T or more is good for is scraping rocks and getting caught on logs. Once you get rid of a big ring you rarely use and do not need, and experience good clearance over rocks, ledges and logs first hand, you will wonder why you ever had one in the first place.
    I got rid of my big ring a few weeks ago for exactly that reason. Every ride I'd nail it at least a few times, whether on rocks or logs. First ride out with the BBG guard and no big ring, and no hits!

    I only ride this bike ON the trail, and I don't think I had every actually used the big ring anyway. And with a 32T front I don't find myself spinning out. I actually ride it mostly like a 1 x 10, if it wasn't for a steep climb or really technical section here and there, I'd prob ditch the granny and go 1 x 10.
    '15 Charge Cooker Maxi 2
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
    '12 Trek 6000
    '11 Ridley X-Ride
    '11 Santa Cruz Driver 8

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    942
    hey this thread got my thinking. I watching some vintage world cup downhill and the fastest Frenchman beat shawn palmer. the funny thing was his cadence coming into the the finish line. he appears to be going the slowest but was going the fastest due to running a larger ring. someone above said something about having a tall gear for mashing and staying smooth. probably looks something like this.

    start watching about the 5 minute mark watch his cadence when he finishes. then watch the slower cadence of the champion in the next run. 1996 World Mountain Bike Championships Men's Downhill - YouTube

  61. #61
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    3x10s are still around because people buy them - period. I'm readin a lot of arguments based on personal preference. Last I checked, these manufacturers make bikes that get shipped around the world. Lots of these places have big mountains. Many riders don't have the stamina to ride a 1x9 or 10 in their area. Others ride dirt and gravel roads almost exclusively and want the big ring.

    It's also a lot cheaper for manufacturers to tweak a mold or manufacturing process that has been around for 20+ years than completely change it.

    The real question is why do manufacturers spec "All Mountain" or "Trail" bikes with a 3x10? Well, because the Pro riders request it. Shimano XT and XTR "Trail" versions are nearly identical to the race versions save a little beefier triple crank and some fins on the brake pistons for cooling.

    SRAM recognized what a lot of you here are commenting about, which is the unnecessary weight of the front shifting assembly and rings. For that, you have XX1. You can always fit it with a 34 up front and have wide-range gearing without the triple front.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Thanks Akiracornell, Nuf said!

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    329
    I have never heard a mountain bike company tout "this model has 30 speeds" or 27, or 20, or 11. It would be kind of stupid if they did, since with 3x9 and 3x10 there is a lot of redundant speeds.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,321
    Quote Originally Posted by suspman View Post
    I am big, and a power rider. I choose to use my BMX background as a kid powering a 44/46 to an 18/20 on a 20" wheel setup. I don't just cruise in between obstacles either. To each their own. And if you see me on the trail point all you want at the mostly extinct big ring. "Hey there's a sighting of an endangered species."
    Lol. So you're used to hammering out 41-48 gear inches? On a 26" bike thats the equivalent of 32:16 or easier (common SS MTB ratio on 26ers), although I guess if you're riding those technical gravel road sections you might be in your big ring cross chaining at 44:22 instead to get the same ratio as your old BMX bike.

    If you're not regularly using your 44:11, 13, 15 combinations then you dont need a big ring and a 36T big ring will be just fine.
    Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    I'm readin a lot of arguments based on personal preference.
    Exactly, mostly based on the TYPE of riding one is doing in their local area. I guarantee 30 miles into a ride, with some of the 26 degree inclines around here, some of you would be beggin' for more granny. Not to mention when it's time to descend, you'd be spinning out that 1 x 10 like a hamster in a wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    3x10s are still around because people buy them - period
    Spot on, I for one, and many others I know won't be giving up their 3x9 anytime soon. 5k to 6k feet worth of combined climbing, with those steep inclines, in 40 to 50 mile days. Even the gear spread of a 3x10 isn't as wide as the 3x9's (XTR)

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    The real question is why do manufacturers spec "All Mountain" or "Trail" bikes with a 3x10? Well, because the Pro riders request it.
    They sure do. At the end of the day, it comes down to the type of trails and riding you choose to do. Look at it this way, choices are GOOD, as trails, terrain and type of use are as varied as those riding them and not one size will fit all

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    533
    For my own riding, I don't use a big ring, mostly for ground clearance and to keep the chain as short as possible. That said, I think the chief advantage of multiple rings has nothing to do with how often you use your tallest gear (44x11). Rather, it's that you can accomplish significant gear changes with one shift, and the triple chainring setup just multiplies the flexibility there.

    Not having to twiddle your way up and down the cogset with multiple shifts can save a lot of time and some effort, and sometimes lets you get the jump on other riders on the downhill, or make a fast transition to a low gear for a sudden steep climb. Likewise, for trails that constantly transition between climbing and descending, you can often settle on a good gear on the cogset, and just use the front shifter to transition between the ups and downs. Much easier/faster than moving from one end of the cogset to the other.

    With the current trend toward single chainring mountain bikes, I'm surprised more people haven't regretted the loss of the major jump you can from a single shift if you have more than one ring.

  67. #67
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by albeant View Post
    d single chainring mountain bikes, I'm surprised more people haven't regretted the loss of the major jump you can from a single shift if you have more than one ring.
    You can shift from 11 to 36 in three presses of a lever, and back in five, with no worries about crosschaining or chainsuck.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    533
    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    You can shift from 11 to 36 in three presses of a lever, and back in five, with no worries about crosschaining or chainsuck.
    I know what you mean, but at the same time this is kind of my point. That's a lot more shifting, and it takes more time. In the constant up-and-down scenario I described, those shifts really add up in terms of effort and time. I'll concede that the simplicity of fewer chainrings offers some advantages, but they don't come without some sacrifice.

    I haven't suffered from chainsuck for quite a few years, but I suppose this could be an issue for some. As for cross chaining, in certain ways, you could also say that fewer chainrings means more opportunities for significant chain angles, since you can't move the chain as much up front to create a straight-ish line to whatever cog you're on. The chainline from the "middle ring" position to either extreme on a modern cogset isn't so hot.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    157
    Albeant good point, some times I can attack the beginning of a climb with 42 and in the middle drop to the middle ring 32 seat and spin. Its very effective when you have two climbs close together, you can kill the climb with all the momentum you achieve on the descent. There is an application/type of ride for every configuration be it single, double or triple.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    533
    Yeah, I ride regularly with one of the fastest descenders in SoCal, and he hasn't given up on the 44t ring. Again, not for the 44x11, but for the jump from 32 to 44 once we're rolling. As I'm dropping cogs, he's already on top of a big gear.

    I don't want to oversell it--again, I don't use a triple--just trying to respond to the OP with a legit reason to have the big ring that I don't hear anyone talking about.

  71. #71
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    Another use of a big ring on descents is to take up the chain slack so as not to bang the chain stay on bikes with non clutch RDs.

    And 44/22 isn't cross chaining at all. There's less stress on the chain with the big ring too.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Well my BMX reference is the single gear start from a dead stop and accelerate up to a useful sprint speed. If you already are a decent speed in a middle ring you can still gain that mash power feel and advantage when going to the middle and in the top half of the cassette. Yes the ease of dropping or gaining gear inches with one front shift is amazing and that is definitely something I do and use as second nature now and for 20 years. Yep stubbornly stuck on my ways. I've been all over the country including Moab, Colorado, Tahoe, and live in Socal. I have never got to a destination needing more or less gears than what I had (except the Mammoth Kamikaze circa '96). So for an end all good reason, 3x9 gives me the freedom to hammer everywhere and walk the least amount in clipless shoes.

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    375
    I have a 2x10 and a 3x10. A couple of weeks ago, I cramped up big time on the last 3 mile climb to my house and was very happy to then drop down to the granny and limp home. It drags on logs all the time, but I just view it as a bash ring. I know we are all supposed to have the fitness to ride a SS fixie for hours through the Tetons, but sometimes it's nice to just duff it up the hill

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    255

    Re: Why are 3x10s still around?

    Having those extra gears falls into the category: "better to have and not need than to need and not have" - especially for us older dudes. Lol

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2

  75. #75
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,967

    Why are 3x10s still around?

    For me I find the benefit of the double is better shifting. Going from a triple 22-32-42 to a double 22-36 on the front lost me nothing on the bottom and only one gear on the top.
    Riding slowly since 1977.

  76. #76
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by lorsban View Post
    Having those extra gears falls into the category: "better to have and not need than to need and not have" - especially for us older dudes. Lol

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
    Well, in this older dude's case, I'm finding out that less is more. There's a lot to be said for simplifying.
    But if somebody feels a triple ring crank is the ticket for them,well that's entirely their business.
    I was watching a friend set up his 1X11 drivetrain today, on his new 650b Turner Burner. That 36t rear cog looked sick! Especially compared to his 30T front ring. In his case, 11 is definitely gonna be enough.

    I can't remember the last time I rode my Joker and actually shifted down to the granny ring. I have a triple on that bike, but I rarely use either the 22T or the 44T big ring. With an 11-34 cassette on it, I can pretty much climb anything that it's possible for me to climb.
    Or I should probably say anything that I would WANT to try climbing. Whatever gets steeper than that, I just basically say the hell with it , and get off and push the bike uphill. It is, after all, a "free-ride sled"- MBA said that, so it must be Word.

  77. #77
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Raton View Post
    I just basically say the hell with it , and get off and push the bike uphill
    Ha!! I would rather eat a mouthful of dirt

  78. #78
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabrielus View Post
    Ha!! I would rather eat a mouthful of dirt
    Last time I ate a mouthful of dirt, I needed 7 stitches, a week of antibiotics, and a rather expensive "C-spine" X-Ray.That had to do with being clipped in, but clipped in on a descent.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    76
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Raton View Post
    Last time I ate a mouthful of dirt, I needed 7 stitches, a week of antibiotics, and a rather expensive "C-spine" X-Ray.That had to do with being clipped in, but clipped in on a descent.

    C-spine and X-ray used in the same sentence is never a good thing

    Especially for old guys like us.

  80. #80
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabrielus View Post
    C-spine and X-ray used in the same sentence is never a good thing

    Especially for old guys like us.
    Well, fortunately, it only revealed the usual amount of degenerative changes that one would expect to find in our age group.

  81. #81
    I like bikes
    Reputation: ghglenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    320
    You guys riding the triples still are making me ache just thinking about it. Why are you in such a hurry? If I rode that hard, I would have to drink "recovery drinks" and less beer at the end of my rides....and that is not happening.
    The older I get, the faster I was.....

  82. #82
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,816
    Quote Originally Posted by ghglenn View Post
    You guys riding the triples still are making me ache just thinking about it. Why are you in such a hurry? If I rode that hard, I would have to drink "recovery drinks" and less beer at the end of my rides....and that is not happening.
    Now THAT'S the Spirit! It's good to find a man who knows his priorities!

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,347
    +1 on the after ride beer, and I would puke my guts out and
    die before I'd push my bike up a hill.

  84. #84
    mtbr member
    Reputation: friz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    369
    I love 3X's. They are cheap right now and make great 1X's with a bash.

    Just built this for my daughter.

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    176
    Triple is the ticket. Find a nice gear in the middle of the rear cassette and mainly use the front mech. Then when you're on a death march you've got a nice granny gear, or an easy pedaling high gear on the downhills. So much easier that shifting through 11 different gears in the rear. I find using the front mech primarily with micro adjustments in the rear to be super efficient. I contemplated going 2x10 with a bash but I know that unless I changed the gearing that would suck ass. Personally I couldn't stand 1x9 with a chain guide, way too much drag and never felt like I was in the right gear. I quickly converted my 1x9 Honzo into a singlespeed at 32x21 which is the ultimate singlespeed ratio for an all mtn bike. I know I'm in the minority here but with a clutch rear mech my 3x10 is so quiet and so sweet, Ill be sticking with 3x10 or singlespeed only. Hell even Bender rides 3x10 and he is the king of all mountain after all!

  86. #86
    29ers Forever
    Reputation: CannondaleF9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,307
    3x10 is still around because the highest gear can be used to pedal while descending, and when you can pedal while going down a mountain that improves your speed overall. A nice middle gear would be the highest gear for a 2x10, so a 3x10 has an improvement of an extra chainring. What surprises me is that a 3x10 crankset costs more than a 2x10 crankset. Unless you are trying to have the lightest bike on your block, then why not go 3x10?

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by ghglenn View Post
    You guys riding the triples still are making me ache just thinking about it. Why are you in such a hurry? If I rode that hard, I would have to drink "recovery drinks" and less beer at the end of my rides....and that is not happening.
    I think you may be missing the point that beer IS a recovery drink.

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,549
    Quote Originally Posted by friz View Post
    I hope she isn't an aggressive rider. That's a lot of headset spacers you have there.

  89. #89
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,251
    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    3x10 is still around because the highest gear can be used to pedal while descending,
    Not even downhillers use 42/44t chainrings. Back in like 1999 maybe, heck I had one I put a mega-range 36t cassette on way back in something like 2001, but it would have been way better served with a 32, 34 or 36 up front.

    Front derailleurs suck at spanning 3 gears up front. They always have. That's one of the biggest reasons 2x10 or 2x11 is far superior. No one is really spinning out a 42-11 combo, and if they are there isn't really much need to go any faster.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    176
    My front derailleur will always span gears just fine. Im running a 3k carbon fiber frame and haven't had a catastrophic dropped chain in years. No mention of spining out a high gear but it is still faster to pedal than to coast the flat open rock free descents.

  91. #91
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,031
    If I were an alien and did't know better, I'd think everyone here was a pro rider on the circuit.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  92. #92
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    70
    Ha! Well said.
    A lot of us aren't that naturally strong, and it gets worse when we get older. I like having a gear for every situation. I've never had any major issues with my front shifting. It's good to have choices. I never complain about the availability of 1X11 or 2x10. Why can't the "supermen" leave my 3x10 alone?

  93. #93
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,251
    Quote Originally Posted by munstro View Post
    My front derailleur will always span gears just fine. Im running a 3k carbon fiber frame and haven't had a catastrophic dropped chain in years. No mention of spining out a high gear but it is still faster to pedal than to coast the flat open rock free descents.
    Really? No rubbing in all gear combos? That's a minor miracle for a 3-ring setup, according to most reputable bicycle institutions and resources.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation: friz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    369
    Quote Originally Posted by mountainbiker24 View Post
    I hope she isn't an aggressive rider. That's a lot of headset spacers you have there.
    Not aggressive at all. She came from a bike with a very high bar and moving her to this bike with the least change to what she was used to required a bunch of spacers. As she puts some miles on it we will be trimming the steer tube and dropping the stem. Already 20mm shorter then what you see here.

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ti-triodes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by friz View Post
    Not aggressive at all. She came from a bike with a very high bar and moving her to this bike with the least change to what she was used to required a bunch of spacers. As she puts some miles on it we will be trimming the steer tube and dropping the stem. Already 20mm shorter then what you see here.

    You're a pretty good dad. You should have seen the hunk of junk my father bought for me when I asked for a bike!

  96. #96
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    I'm not spinning out my 46, just spinning it. A tight chain means power is going to the ground. And since I haven't seen a clutch 9spd rear derailleur I gots to use the big ring to keep more tension on the chain and not drop it.
    No there is rubbing on a 3x9 but if you truly use the big rig and big cog or granny and 11 tooth, that's dumb. As you get used to the massive gear range you will know what gears rub and which gears to switch to, to keep your output the most efficient for the changing terrain you are on. A la drop to the middle then up one or two cogs to compensate for the large drop and turn it into even increments while maintaining cadence. I use my 36 mid for the whole 11-34 range and the granny for the lowest 3 cogs and the big for the smallest 4 cogs or so.

  97. #97
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,147
    Quote Originally Posted by suspman View Post
    And since I haven't seen a clutch 9spd rear derailleur I gots to use the big ring to keep more tension on the chain and not drop it.
    You can use Shimano 10sp clutch derailler with SRAM 9sp shifters. Big thread about it around these forums.

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    161
    Oh cool thanks. I heard that before minus the clutch part, now I get it. except I'm a SRAM guy I wonder how much the clutch adds to the mix...off to price search!

  99. #99
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    437
    They may not be perfect, but I personally have had very few issues with front derailuer, just set and forget. Sometimes it needs an adjust, sometimes it just rubs a tad if bending the chain. I doubt the biggest reason is gear changes as to why 2x's are popular.
    I find this very funny "there isn't really much need to go any faster. "
    that is your opinion, I want to go as fast as I can, when I can, that way when some blowhard is on his 2x10, I can keep up at slower pace, with a better transmission. You don't see 3 speed car transmissions, 5-6 and more for a reason..... it is better, not simpler.
    Downhillers don't use it.... well, they have different goals. I ride down, I want to crank the biggest ring I can, then glide up the incline far easier than those that cant pedal hard down.
    Each his own.
    Side note, 16k posts...holly cow Jayem

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Not even downhillers use 42/44t chainrings. Back in like 1999 maybe, heck I had one I put a mega-range 36t cassette on way back in something like 2001, but it would have been way better served with a 32, 34 or 36 up front.

    Front derailleurs suck at spanning 3 gears up front. They always have. That's one of the biggest reasons 2x10 or 2x11 is far superior. No one is really spinning out a 42-11 combo, and if they are there isn't really much need to go any faster.

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Really? No rubbing in all gear combos? That's a minor miracle for a 3-ring setup, according to most reputable bicycle institutions and resources.
    Rubbing in all combos? Yeah, no. Although i can't take credit for this as I have a reputable mechanic who I really don't mind giving my money too. Institutions on the other hand, well never mind. Thanks for the enlightenment though, as all this time I thought 2x10 was designed for people who didn't know how to shift without cross chaining, thought it looked cooler, or were under the perception that it's lighter. Those three reasons in my opinion are the reasons 2x10 is still around.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •