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  1. #26
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos
    Get some properly wide rims.
    Here is my 29x2.40 Ardent on 47mm wide Kris Holm.
    My pressure range is 12-14 / 16-18 PSI (210lb).
    30PSI is more than you need for the road!

    that rear tire looks suuuper light - I bet is corners like a rail
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  2. #27
    GAME ON!
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck
    To bad its not the DH casting version I was looking for one for my big bike.
    i have 2 dh casings available

  3. #28
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    2.5 WTB Prowler MX on Chainlove right now $14.99

    2.5 WTB Prowler MX on Chainlove right now $14.99.

  4. #29
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    Thanks for all the suggestions and new places to look. 2.5 seems to be about right for my type and style of riding. 2.7's are a little too big for the rear but I have sanded the knobs on one side to keep the chain from hitting on the small ring. Most folks that ride tend to run the 2-2.25 tires at 40 psi which in my opinion is not enough volume to make for a smooth ride on rough terrain. Also most folks don't understand that about 80% of your shock absorption is tires. The high frequency low amplitude stuff won't move a fork tube. I need to give some thought to wider rims because that is free volume. More volume = lower pressure = smoother ride. Yes you pay in terms of friction but since I am old and would rather be slow and safe instead of fast and loose. I have done enough of the latter and I am paying for it now.

    And before you guys just on me about the "most folks" comment I mean your average goober that buys a mountain bike and has no real knowledge of how it works. The kind that take the bike to the shop to have a tire changed and a tune up.

    Perry

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    that rear tire looks suuuper light - I bet is corners like a rail
    It literally does coz I use rails to get to the trails ...
    www.bartthebikeman.wordpress.com
    fast 26" road bike, shaven Racing Ralphs as road tyres, homemade "Paul thumbies"...

  6. #31
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    If you are pushing the limits of traction in slimy conditions try looking into siping. You slice your knobs with a razor blade in a way to get more gripping edges. I agree about tires being an important part of suspension.

  7. #32
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by perryg114
    Thanks for all the suggestions and new places to look. 2.5 seems to be about right for my type and style of riding. 2.7's are a little too big for the rear but I have sanded the knobs on one side to keep the chain from hitting on the small ring. Most folks that ride tend to run the 2-2.25 tires at 40 psi which in my opinion is not enough volume to make for a smooth ride on rough terrain. Also most folks don't understand that about 80% of your shock absorption is tires. The high frequency low amplitude stuff won't move a fork tube. I need to give some thought to wider rims because that is free volume. More volume = lower pressure = smoother ride. Yes you pay in terms of friction but since I am old and would rather be slow and safe instead of fast and loose. I have done enough of the latter and I am paying for it now.

    And before you guys just on me about the "most folks" comment I mean your average goober that buys a mountain bike and has no real knowledge of how it works. The kind that take the bike to the shop to have a tire changed and a tune up.

    Perry
    Then you need to tune your fork and shock better, or ride smoother. Set up your suspension so it works, unlike your average goober that buys a mountain bike and has no real knowledge of how it works. The kind that take the bike to the shop to have a tire changed and a tune up.

    Minion DHF 2.35 and ADvantage 2.25 with a tubeless setup. 30psi, no pinches, very comfy. Or something. There are a lot of good tires in this range.

    IMO, a smaller tire with a non-crappy tread pattern will always beat out a larger tire with crap treads. All the shock absorption means nothing if you have crap for traction The WTB meats you mention are some of the worst tires I've ever tried. Spending the money on some good tires is well worthwhile.

    YMMV.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover
    Then you need to tune your fork and shock better, or ride smoother. Set up your suspension so it works, unlike your average goober that buys a mountain bike and has no real knowledge of how it works. The kind that take the bike to the shop to have a tire changed and a tune up.

    Minion DHF 2.35 and ADvantage 2.25 with a tubeless setup. 30psi, no pinches, very comfy. Or something. There are a lot of good tires in this range.

    IMO, a smaller tire with a non-crappy tread pattern will always beat out a larger tire with crap treads. All the shock absorption means nothing if you have crap for traction The WTB meats you mention are some of the worst tires I've ever tried. Spending the money on some good tires is well worthwhile.

    YMMV.
    Amen!

    There are a few WTB tire that I like but they aren't any that were mentioned in the OP.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos
    Get some properly wide rims.
    Here is my 29x2.40 Ardent on 47mm wide Kris Holm.
    My pressure range is 12-14 / 16-18 PSI (210lb).
    30PSI is more than you need for the road!

    Using a wider rim than necessary just exposes more tire sidewall. End result, torn/ripped sidewall.

  10. #35
    DIY all the way
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz
    Using a wider rim than necessary just exposes more tire sidewall. End result, torn/ripped sidewall.
    I have had the same experience.

    Back when a big tire was a 2.2", I tried to get around the lack of width, by using 40mm rims. The end of the story was a lot of dents and scratches in the rim, and torn sidewalls were a frequent issue, so I stopped using that "trick" rather soon.

    Now that one can have whatever size imaginable, I see no point in trying to work around buying the right size for the job.


    Magura

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos

    ... latest incarnation with real... Ardents.
    sketchy.

  12. #37
    I do what I want
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbeck
    That's an easy one. Better grip,more stability and faster rolling in rugged terrain. This is especially important in the front. Although fat tires are pretty much useless on smooth hardpack.

    Meh not always true, esp that faster rolling thing. I used to think like that too, but Ive learned over the 20+ yrs Ive been riding, bigger usually just means slower.
    Guy.Ford

    I'm not really an @sshole, I just act like one online.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by perryg114
    Most folks that ride tend to run the 2-2.25 tires at 40 psi which in my opinion is not enough volume to make for a smooth ride on rough terrain. Also most folks don't understand that about 80% of your shock absorption is tires. The high frequency low amplitude stuff won't move a fork tube. I need to give some thought to wider rims because that is free volume. More volume = lower pressure = smoother ride.
    Perry
    1+
    I'm with you on this one. I don't think that many people understand that, though.
    It's like trying to explain the benefits (speed, grip, comfort) of wider tyres to roadies.
    Most of them will claim that 23mm is all you need. Same group thinking mentality
    www.bartthebikeman.wordpress.com
    fast 26" road bike, shaven Racing Ralphs as road tyres, homemade "Paul thumbies"...

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos
    1+
    I'm with you on this one. I don't think that many people understand that, though.
    It's like trying to explain the benefits (speed, grip, comfort) of wider tyres to roadies.
    Most of them will claim that 23mm is all you need. Same group thinking mentality
    No, I think a ton of people here understand quite well about the benefits of volume otherwise most people would still be running 2.1s front and rear. There is always an ideal size where the tradeoffs are minimized and the benefits are maximized based on the tire options in question, and for many people that just happens to fall in the less than 2.5" range.

  15. #40
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos
    1+
    I'm with you on this one. I don't think that many people understand that, though.
    It's like trying to explain the benefits (speed, grip, comfort) of wider tyres to roadies.
    Most of them will claim that 23mm is all you need. Same group thinking mentality
    Nobody is suggesting 2.1 - 2.2" tires. We are talking about 2.4" tires with good volume and thread being a good substitute for 2.5".

    Your roadie friends may go to 25 or even 32, but 35 or 42 would probably an overkill, right?
    Last edited by Axe; 04-18-2011 at 09:29 AM.

  16. #41
    Warrior's Society
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    I crashed hard enough on my Tallboy to break my leg,
    The carbon is way more durable than most people.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    No, I think a ton of people here understand quite well about the benefits of volume otherwise most people would still be running 2.1s front and rear. There is always an ideal size where the tradeoffs are minimized and the benefits are maximized based on the tire options in question, and for many people that just happens to fall in the less than 2.5" range.
    At any given time we have some "ideal" sizes/standards.
    Then... they change
    www.bartthebikeman.wordpress.com
    fast 26" road bike, shaven Racing Ralphs as road tyres, homemade "Paul thumbies"...

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barteos
    1+
    I'm with you on this one. I don't think that many people understand that, though.
    It's like trying to explain the benefits (speed, grip, comfort) of wider tyres to roadies.
    Most of them will claim that 23mm is all you need. Same group thinking mentality
    Ok, perhaps I could have used different wording.
    What I meant was that some folks seem to question the guy's needs and preferences only because they fall outside the established, popular standards.
    www.bartthebikeman.wordpress.com
    fast 26" road bike, shaven Racing Ralphs as road tyres, homemade "Paul thumbies"...

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by perryg114
    Thanks for all the suggestions and new places to look. 2.5 seems to be about right for my type and style of riding. 2.7's are a little too big for the rear but I have sanded the knobs on one side to keep the chain from hitting on the small ring. Most folks that ride tend to run the 2-2.25 tires at 40 psi which in my opinion is not enough volume to make for a smooth ride on rough terrain. Also most folks don't understand that about 80% of your shock absorption is tires. The high frequency low amplitude stuff won't move a fork tube. I need to give some thought to wider rims because that is free volume. More volume = lower pressure = smoother ride. Yes you pay in terms of friction but since I am old and would rather be slow and safe instead of fast and loose. I have done enough of the latter and I am paying for it now.

    And before you guys just on me about the "most folks" comment I mean your average goober that buys a mountain bike and has no real knowledge of how it works. The kind that take the bike to the shop to have a tire changed and a tune up.

    Perry
    At 40psi it is not the tire volume that reduces the ride quality. Higher volume just means you can run lower pressures for more Cush and grip without flatting.

    2.25 can be plenty big enough to run at <25psi (even a 2.1 @ 30psi) and bomb down a rough trail on a rigid bike. I do it all the time. Of course I have years of knowing how to pick good lines.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  20. #45
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    At 40psi it is not the tire volume that reduces the ride quality. Higher volume just means you can run lower pressures for more Cush and grip without flatting.

    2.25 can be plenty big enough to run at <25psi (even a 2.1 @ 30psi) and bomb down a rough trail on a rigid bike. I do it all the time. Of course I have years of knowing how to pick good lines.
    Hey. I see what you did there.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

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