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  1. #1
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    What's the Average Weight of Modern Mountain Bikes?

    Quick question, what's a nice average weight for a mountain bike these days? I don't know if it's because I'm a noob or what, but I'm getting my ass handed to me on some local trails, and it's either one of two things, I'm not pedaling hard enough or these guys have lighter bikes. My bike weighs in at 26 lbs.

  2. #2
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    AM bikes usually seem to be ~30lb, DH bikes ~40lb, and I'm not sure about XC bikes. Your bike weight probably isn't the issue, you just need to ride more, though tires might be a factor...

  3. #3
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    It's rider weight, not bike weight

  4. #4
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    26lb is very light.

    Rider weight counts SO much more than people realize. the 220lb guys trying to shave grams off a 25lb bike have no chance against a strong 150lb rider on a 32lb bike. Everyone likes a light bike, but fitness and body weight are enormous advantages, drastically more than a couple pounds of bike.

  5. #5
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    I agree with the above posts. Rider weight is so much more important, as is a riders strength. I rode with buddies the other day on their ~22lb, carbon 29er xc bikes with me on my AM 30lb beast and was the fastest out of all of us. It wasn't that my bike was the lightest, it was that I've been riding forever and they haven't.
    When I used to race on the road and was new to it, even though I LOOKED fitter and stronger, I'd get my butt handed to me by "fat" looking guys that had been riding forever. I learned very quickly that it's all about the rider and not the machine. Little factors (like the above poster said) like tires can make a difference, but the determining factor in whether or not you keep up comes down to the engine and what kind of skills it has.

  6. #6
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    motor needs a tune-up

    to answer 26-28lbs is the norm

  7. #7
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    It's because you call yourself a noob. Change your title to expert and you will automatically go faster.

    And +1 to what others have said.
    Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life trying to save

  8. #8
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    yeah, over the past year I've gone from 174 lbs down to 150, and my bike has gone from 27 to now coil suspension and 31lbs... I'm way faster now than I was a year ago!
    determined to put the "mountain" back in "MOUNTAIN BIKING!!!" "HIT IT!"
    2012 MOJO HDeeeeeeee!!!!
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  9. #9
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    I don't think I ever considered weight being an issue because I'm 150 lbs. I probably need to bulk up a little more and practice. Thanks for the replies!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by w201 View Post
    Quick question, what's a nice average weight for a mountain bike these days? I don't know if it's because I'm a noob or what, but I'm getting my ass handed to me on some local trails, and it's either one of two things, I'm not pedaling hard enough or these guys have lighter bikes. My bike weighs in at 26 lbs.
    dh bikes around 40. xc around 20. so 30 is the average.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by w201 View Post
    I don't think I ever considered weight being an issue because I'm 150 lbs. I probably need to bulk up a little more and practice. Thanks for the replies!
    150 is certainly not heavy (unless your 4') which leaves you with seat time and working just a bit more to keep pace. All of this stuff depends on ones frame of mind and any goals you may have of either competing or just being a recreational enthusiast enjoying the scenery.

  12. #12
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    How new are you? It does take a while to build up the leg strength and endurance to bike fast. Its a different set of muscles than anything else you typically use.

  13. #13
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    Technique can also be a killer to even the most fit cyclist. I regularly ride with triatheletes, the Ironman variety. When the trail is fast and straight they can kill me but i just let them go because as soon as it get twisty and turny and technical I catch right back up. At the end of the ride they are completely shelled and I, being in much less shape then them, am too but they shouldn't be. It is only because they are working so hard to make it through things that I just fly through.

    Practice your cornering, if you are braking turning then accelerating through the corners, that is inefficient and you are wasting energy. Practice pumping through the rollers, using gravity to accelerate you down the hills and then attack over the top of the next hill.

    If you are getting killed by guys you regularly ride with, watch what they are doing in the technical sections, emulate them and frankly nothing makes you faster than riding with people that are faster than you.
    Try this: HTFU

  14. #14
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    yep deffo rider weight , i'm currently around 210 due to working away from home followed by a nasty ankle injury ,my fit weight is around 175-180, i'm basicly running 2 gears lower for a given climb for the same effort.

    on the other hand a guy i used to ride with who was in his late 40's and had to weigh 270+ was an absolute monster on the climbs and embaraced many 120 lb racing snakes.

    but as is mentioned above the dude was a competative time trialer in his younger days and has ridden bikes his whole life .

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    How new are you? It does take a while to build up the leg strength and endurance to bike fast. Its a different set of muscles than anything else you typically use.
    I would say I'm fairly new. Ive been riding BMX style bikes all my life but got my first non department store mountain bike last month.

    I made damn sure the bike fit me perfectly before I settled on it but I've been noticing that I have some shoulder pain after each ride. Could that be from overly reaching for the handlebars. The previous owner had put an extra long stem onit, which looks sweet, but yea. I also have the shorter stock stem.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by w201 View Post
    I made damn sure the bike fit me perfectly before I settled on it but I've been noticing that I have some shoulder pain after each ride. Could that be from overly reaching for the handlebars. The previous owner had put an extra long stem on it, which looks sweet, but yea. I also have the shorter stock stem.
    Having it user friendly is paramount to the enjoyment so either try the shorter stem or haul it to a LBS and get assistance with fitment otherwise your experience will suck every time out.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nvphatty View Post
    Having it user friendly is paramount to the enjoyment so either try the shorter stem or haul it to a LBS and get assistance with fitment otherwise your experience will suck every time out.
    +1
    A fitment is a very good idea.

  18. #18
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    the good thing about being big and fat is that we go down faster.

    no matter what there will always be somebody faster, don't worry about it just try hard and have fun. that what being on the trail is all about, having fun.

  19. #19
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    where you get this numbers from?? the lightness AM bike i ever saw was the giant reign x 14.2kg(31.2lb) and scott genius lt 14.1kg(31lb), all other was 15-17kg..(33-38lb)

  20. #20
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    tire width and weight is what i feel the most, any bike 30ish lbs and under is fun to ride for xc/am.
    2012 Giant Reign 1

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyco View Post
    where you get this numbers from?? the lightness AM bike i ever saw was the giant reign x 14.2kg(31.2lb) and scott genius lt 14.1kg(31lb), all other was 15-17kg..(33-38lb)
    wife has a 2011 reign 0, small mens frame and it weighs in at 29.something lbs.

    not to one up you, but i think +/- 30lbs is a good answer.. 29-33lbs is about what you going to get for 3-5k worth of bike.
    2012 Giant Reign 1

  22. #22
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    LARGE spectrum of bike weights. Totally depends on yer trail application. XC weight weenie racer types will have carbon hardtails come closer to 20-25 lbs. Trail and AM bikes are usually 25-35 lbs (25 is very light still). Anything past 35 pounder is either downhill or just a crappy Walmart bike. If I had to bet, I would bet the average bike I see on my trails in Wyo/Colorado weigh in around 30 lbs.
    Keep in mind the really light bikes are designed for super-tame trails or dirt road riding. I know on the trails I ride on, some extra weight is beneficial as that weight makes up things like a strong-frame and stout suspension. Even Carbon fiber bikes in the AM category are not that light, and usually weigh only 1 lb less than alloy bikes in the same category.

  23. #23
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    A 26 lb bike is relatively light for a trail bike.

    XC bikes are 18-23lb

    A lot of things factor into MTB speed. Bike weight is only an important factor when everything else is equal: ie, at the elite levels of the sport where everybody has 3% body fat and lungs the size of Texas. Then, a pound or 2 of bike weight makes a difference over the course of a 30 mile XC race.

    Just concentrate on getting fitter/stronger. Your equipment is not holding you back.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
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  24. #24
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    My enduro is beefed up to about 32 pounds and I out pedal the large majority of people on the trail. I credit 80% of this to my fitness an rider skill and 20% to the bike. I rode 32 pound, 32x18 singlespeed for about a year and going back to a geared, FS bike was like heaven. 26lbs is crazy light compared to the bikes I'm used to riding.

  25. #25
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    My allow Stumpy 29er weighs about 30.5 with dropper post. Gonna try to get it down to 28lb, which should be pretty light for a 5 inch travel 29er.

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