View Poll Results: What degree/type of rise do you use?

Voters
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  • 0 - No Rise

    3 5.77%
  • 20mm - Low Rise

    29 55.77%
  • 30mm - Mid Rise

    12 23.08%
  • 40mm - High Rise

    8 15.38%
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
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    Smile What type of rise on your handlebars?

    Hi there, new to the biking scene and looking to get a better bar for dh/all mountain.

    Not sure about what rise to get (I am sure its personal preference but no bike shops close to me to try different ones out).

    Why did you choose to have that certain amount of rise?

    What are the different advantages/disadvantages to different rises?


    0 - No rise
    20mm - Low Rise
    30mm - Mid Rise
    40mm - High Rise

    Thanks for the help!!!

  2. #2
    Ride or die
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    I have always liked the low to mid rise for the mixture of comfort and performance. No rise bars are just unbearably uncomfortable XC specific. With the high-rise bars, I just feel too upright and out of position without enough weight on my bars.

    I determined my preference through trial and error. You just have to try them out, so start with a mid- rise. If you feel too low, up the rise a bit; conversely, if you feel too upright, go down a bit.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    I chose "no rise" because my legs are pretty short and I still like to get the bar just a little below seat level (when seat is high for pedaling).

    A higher bar makes me feel like I'm perched high above the bike: less in control and harder to get myself low on the bike for those steeper spots with some bumps.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  4. #4
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    I voted for 20mm rise since that's what's going on my next bike.

    I've been rocking 40mm Easton bars on a bike with 140mm travel and a lot of stem spacers, but this new bike is custom and will have a taller head tube, and I got a deal on some Atlas bars. I like my bars a little lower than my saddle.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    I voted for 20mm rise since that's what's going on my next bike.

    I've been rocking 40mm Easton bars on a bike with 140mm travel and a lot of stem spacers, but this new bike is custom and will have a taller head tube, and I got a deal on some Atlas bars. I like my bars a little lower than my saddle.
    why going from 40mm to 20mm? my fork is only 100mm travel and looking at a high rise instead of my stock 20mm

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by polecats03 View Post
    why going from 40mm to 20mm? my fork is only 100mm travel and looking at a high rise instead of my stock 20mm
    Going from 140mm fork on an undersized 20" frame to a 160mm fork on a custom hardtail frame. My builder is going to spec a taller headtube so I dont need to run as many spacers under my stem, if any.

    And I got a killer deal on my new bars.

  7. #7
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    Rise of the bar is contingent on so many parameters that you may as well ask how much seat post sticks out of your frame.
    The correct rise on your bar will be dependant on;
    Is the bike built for;
    railing corners?
    steep climbs?
    5hr pedal fests?
    shuttle work?
    smooth fast descents?
    steep technical descents?
    Bike setup;
    long travel bike?
    short travel bike?
    top of head tube to centerline of bottom bracket vertical dimension?
    stem length/rise?
    effective top tube length?
    Rider setup;
    long legs/short torso?
    short legs/long torso?
    average body dimesnions?

    And then, with all that sorted out, it will come to what feels best for you, for the way you ride the bike.

    My 16.5" frame 7" travel FR/AM bike runs a 1.5" rise, 50mm stem with 0 rise and 3 spacers. That works great for steep technical downhills. I'm swapping a 0.75" rise bar on and moving the spacers to the top of the stem because lately all I've been doing is pedal rides, and I want a better climbing position and to be lower the front end height to rail corners with more control.
    My 16" hardtail x/c bike ran a 63mm fork, flat bar and bar-ends with a 160mm stem flipped to achieve a -5* rise. When I was in my mid 20's, and racing x/c that combo set me in an ultimate pedaling position and allowed me to climb like there was no tomorrow. Of course, I had to tilt my head to look forward any real distance. I'm now 43, have an office job, and the bike sports a 4" fork, 0.5" rise bar, 70mm stem with 10* rise. It is easy on my back, allows me to look where I'm riding, got rid of the crazy twitchy steering and is much more stable at speed. Doesn't climb like it used to tho.

    So, it simply all depends.
    My bikes, Slayer 70 and Switch 2

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike H. View Post
    Rise of the bar is contingent on so many parameters ...

    So, it simply all depends.
    I totally agree with theses comments.

    you will have to experiment to get the fit you need.

    You can start by having your bars at about the same height as you seat when you seat is at pedaling height(or slightly lower, about 1'', that how i like mine)...that could be with a high rise or low rise bar depending on how many spacers you can fit under the stem.
    Last edited by tartosuc; 07-27-2011 at 05:19 AM.

  9. #9
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    I like my bars as close to the headtube as I can get them, including short stems and as low of a rise as possible.

    However, I don't like the rise so low that I can't rest the bike on its back. So no flatbars. 20mm rise is sufficient for this. Gotta be able to rest the bike on its back in case I need to make an adjustment on the bike mid-ride.
    ***

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