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  1. #1
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    What is a trail bike

    As the title suggest and i have heard that term(trail bike) many times but i can't understand what it means can some body enliten me...thanks

  2. #2
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    Trail=All Mountain

    Quote Originally Posted by wadly_1001
    As the title suggest and i have heard that term(trail bike) many times but i can't understand what it means can some body enliten me...thanks
    I've used the term myself and from my personal perspective, it's inline with what many people consider to be the same classification as an all mountain rig. It may or may not be full suspension, would probably have 5"-6" of travel up front, and would likely be outfitted with components that would give more consideration to strength and durability than weight.

    I hope this helps. Others may have different perspectives.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  3. #3
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    Anything you would ride on a trail.

  4. #4
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    I was going to say:
    A bike you ride on a trail.



    A road bike has tires less than 1.125 inches wide with very little tread and is used mainly on pavement.

    A trail/mountain bike has wider tires with more aggressive tread and is used mainly off road on non paved trails.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  5. #5
    tl1
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    Heavier duty than a crosscountry bike

    Heavier than a XC bike and less good for crossccountry racing but much better for riding all day and having maximum fun. More fork (and rear suspension travel) travel too.

  6. #6
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    To give a more serious answer (though I do think my first assesment is mostly right), a trail bike is anything you would ride on a ride in the woods with your friends (or by yourself). Basically a mountain bike that gets used in non-competitive situations, and not for shuttle runs. For me, this is anything from a rigid SS to a 7 x 7 full susser.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    and not for shuttle runs.
    Why can't you use them for shuttle runs?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwnhlldav
    Why can't you use them for shuttle runs?
    I think he means that a trail bike is one that is able to be pedalled uphill, unlike a 40 lb DH bike with a single 36 tooth chainring that won't get you very far when the grade gets steep.

    However, you should be able to use a trail bike on shuttle runs. You would just need to be a little more careful so as not to break it or have the chain fall off.

    I'm going to agree with Clyde in that "trail bike" is synonomous with "all mountain". It's just the more antiquated terminology.

  9. #9
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    A "Trail Bike" is a robust, non-competitive mountain bike. The sort of bike that can be ridden comfortably all day over a wide variety of trails without falling to pieces or weighing you down like a boat anchor. It usually implies full suspension with 5-6" travel, but can also be a well built hardtail with a long travel fork and laid back geometry. It's really an alternative term for "All Mountain". No doubt someone will be along in a minute to tell you they don't exist and it's all a marketing fantasy
    [SIZE="2"]Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyechka
    I think he means that a trail bike is one that is able to be pedalled uphill, unlike a 40 lb DH bike with a single 36 tooth chainring that won't get you very far when the grade gets steep.

    However, you should be able to use a trail bike on shuttle runs. You would just need to be a little more careful so as not to break it or have the chain fall off.

    I'm going to agree with Clyde in that "trail bike" is synonomous with "all mountain". It's just the more antiquated terminology.
    Right. I meant not exclusively for shuttle runs. Poorly worded post on my part.

  11. #11
    All Mountain Rider
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    It's a bike with anywhere from 4-6inches of front travel and 3-5 inches of rear travel. Basically it is whatever bike you can comfortably ride a trail with
    Haro Hucker

  12. #12
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    Yeah...I'd agree with a lot of the comments...

    Trail bikes are those that you can ride on the trails all day. I'd say they generally have more suspension travel and weight than the XC machines (XC are typically 4") but not usually more than 7" travel (for efficiency in riding all day).

    They are more robust than XC machines, but nowhere near as beefy as DH or FR bikes. Made to be able to go fast, but not race speeds.

    If I had to put "trail bike" into a more modern perspective, I'd say "lighter all mountain." Not made for the super nasty drops and shore stuff, but able to hold its own on the stuff the "average" rider will throw at it.

    As a guy who likes the Gary Fisher line, the Fat Possum is more typically an "all mountain" bike, the Cake DLX series is more a "trail" bike and the plain Cake models (non DLX) are more into the "cross country (XC)" end of things.
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  13. #13
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    Oh alright cause i just want to give an disapline to my rig, as i ride street and am now building a trail bike, so what would you consider this rig

    Sinister ridge frame
    Fox 36 talas 06 rc2
    Deemax
    Sram X.O trigger and Rear d
    Diablous crank, stem, bar
    Xt 4 pot brakes 6"
    Syncros derived seat post
    SDG free style saddle
    2.5 tires

    Would this be FR or AM...i am thinking FR?Can anyone correct me?

  14. #14
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    I'd say more FR than trail with that build. If you're going to actually ride it around for several hours, rather than mess around on jumps and stuff, you could do with lighter wheels (eg Crossmax XL), crankset (eg Atlas) and tyres (eg 2.2"). I wouldn't bother with the overpriced Sram X0 gear either, get the X9 equivalents instead and put the money you saved back into the wheelset. It all depends on your own concept of "trail riding"
    [SIZE="2"]Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine[/SIZE]

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