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  1. #1
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    What technique do you use to get over an large object while climbing?

    I did a search and didnt find anything. Been having issues while in semi tech climbs having only one line and needing to get over say, a 1/2 foot to a foot object, or cliff. Been hiking over it. Usually Stop by popping my front tire on the object, then hopping off. I dont know know what to do after I plant my tire. I could "hop" the bike from that position to rear on the log and off...But I cant do that as far as I know. Any advice/videos/tips? Be much appreciated, been a real sticking point in my progression.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonez3113 View Post
    I did a search and didnt find anything. Been having issues while in semi tech climbs having only one line and needing to get over say, a 1/2 foot to a foot object, or cliff. Been hiking over it. Usually Stop by popping my front tire on the object, then hopping off. I dont know know what to do after I plant my tire. I could "hop" the bike from that position to rear on the log and off...But I cant do that as far as I know. Any advice/videos/tips? Be much appreciated, been a real sticking point in my progression.
    3 & 9 position on the crankset, anticipating the down stroke as you get the bike to start it's push.

    As the bike wants to drop downward use the leverage afforded by your foot position, hopefully ideal gear selection and, choice application of the crankset.

    After a while of knowing how to manipulate the bike you'll be able to do controlled bunnyhops w/o keeping the crankset spinning - catch your breath.
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches


  3. #3
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    Might this help?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3tFgQm0l5I

    One thing I'd change is that I tend to get out of the seat earlier than the video recommends. But that could just be me... :-)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjeast View Post
    Might this help?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3tFgQm0l5I

    One thing I'd change is that I tend to get out of the seat earlier than the video recommends. But that could just be me... :-)
    Thank you!!! Great video. Will def try those techniques on the trail, w your advice. Need to practice lifting the rear wheel like that. Assume I usually stop on the object, this time ill proceed with some momentum and try and get over... Would this work for a log? Something that is high, then abruptly ends. The video has him rolling up to another flat surface. Im curious if the rear wheel technique would work in for logs?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haint View Post
    3 & 9 position on the crankset, anticipating the down stroke as you get the bike to start it's push.

    As the bike wants to drop downward use the leverage afforded by your foot position, hopefully ideal gear selection and, choice application of the crankset.

    After a while of knowing how to manipulate the bike you'll be able to do controlled bunnyhops w/o keeping the crankset spinning - catch your breath.
    There a name for this technique? Would like to see some vids of that sort of hop.

  6. #6
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    Just SEND IT!!!

    Get the front tire on top of the obstacle and air hump your handlebars like a teenager at prom.

  7. #7
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    Jeez those videos are easy stuff. Tons of speed and momentum coming into those "challenging" rock steps. How about doing one where you've been grinding your lowest gear for a bit, heart rate at or near max, and you have zero momentum!

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    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    Jeez those videos are easy stuff. Tons of speed and momentum coming into those "challenging" rock steps. How about doing one where you've been grinding your lowest gear for a bit, heart rate at or near max, and you have zero momentum!
    Heh. In my case, with my knees, there's probably a 90% chance that in those circumstances it would be the "stop and walk" technique. :-)

  9. #9
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    I use Form II. Also known as the Makashi. Through careful training and use of the force, you lift wheel over obstacle using momentum to carry you over the obstacle. Also will incorporate Form III which is known as the Soreso. With the wheel over obstacle, momentum, I will hop the rear wheel over.

    Lack of momentum will result in a fall to the darkside.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonez3113 View Post
    There a name for this technique? Would like to see some vids of that sort of hop.
    Go onto YouTube and look for BMX Gate Starts.

    While the body position is being altered for keeping weight on the rear-wheel and on the downstroke-to-upstroke of the crankset, the transfer of body mass over the balance point (bottom bracket) of a rider and bike together is pretty common to Mountain Bike - just not as abrupt.

    This technique then gets applied out of corners, wheelieing over smaller obstacles like those you describe, and for pedalling off the back of the saddle and into braking situations.
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches


  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonez3113 View Post
    Thank you!!! Great video. Will def try those techniques on the trail, w your advice. Need to practice lifting the rear wheel like that. Assume I usually stop on the object, this time ill proceed with some momentum and try and get over... Would this work for a log? Something that is high, then abruptly ends.
    It works over logs too.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by micky View Post
    I use Form II. Also known as the Makashi. Through careful training and use of the force, you lift wheel over obstacle using momentum to carry you over the obstacle. Also will incorporate Form III which is known as the Soreso. With the wheel over obstacle, momentum, I will hop the rear wheel over.Lack of momentum will result in a fall to the darkside.
    What does momentum have to do with e-bikes?

  14. #14
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    Controlled momentum.

    What also helps is balance. It's kind of a lost art since most trails don't have skinny's anymore. But you can practice your track stands (balancing in place using pedal force against your brakes as leverage trying not to move forward) or setting up a few 2X4's or 4X4's in your yard and practicing on those.

    Great balance is key to succeeding in difficult climbing sections. Instead of stopping & tipping over you have time to bunny hop/pedal more/lift wheel & move it/look really cool for a few seconds before tipping over.

  15. #15
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    All good advice. More travel can help to climb over obstacles if the bike isn't too heavy. Smaller gear and spin faster and accelerating with a burst of speed over the obstacle helps. More fitness helps to be able to maintain accelerative burst over obstacles. Also bigger wheels help and tires good gripping knobs not pumped up too high.

  16. #16
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    In the video, when that guy says to stay seated and use momentum to get the rear wheel over the first rock... did anyone wince as the tire gets nearly pinched too? I would not be sitting down with the rear wheel personally.

  17. #17
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    I mean, once you get the front tire over, your 90% there. Just pedal and throw your weight forward when the back tire hits the ledge. That's really all I do and I can clear 2' ledges pretty comfortably.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    I mean, once you get the front tire over, your 90% there. Just pedal and throw your weight forward when the back tire hits the ledge. That's really all I do and I can clear 2' ledges pretty comfortably.
    So I have been practicing and can get up onto the seat part of a standard picnic bench. Found I need a bit of speed. But the rear tire seams to just bang against the bench, rather than clear it. Mentally having an issue putting the lifting of the rear tire while the front tire is doing its thing...any advice?

  19. #19
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    Practice doing nose wheelies. Once you get comfortable try using less front brake & more body english.

  20. #20
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    The technique shown in the Jeff Lenosky video is what you should be practicing if you want to progress further in your riding skills. Especially for technical climbs and urban street riding.

    In the picture attached I made this vertical climb. The height is about 37". This is higher than a park picnic tables top.
    With this technique even undercut ledges are possible as shown by Jeff climbing onto a picnic table.
    It looks like it would be impossible, until you start watching what trials bicycle riders are able to climb onto.

    In the picture.
    The front tire is lifted and punched into the top corner. This is the top tire mark. It then deflects up pulling the rest of the bicycle.
    The rear tire leaves the ground around where the shrub is. This shrub helps to provide a kick up. The rear tire then hits the wall at the lower (middle) tire mark. The rear tire then bounces back off the wall and proceeds to clear the wall.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What technique do you use to get over an large object while climbing?-wall.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Pedal like f**k, so you have momentum on your side...

    Momentum is a powerful Allie... mmm...

    Get your front wheel up/over & then throw you arms+hips forward & you should be up ^^

    If there's a roller down the other side, compose yourself & gain your balance & ratchet a couple of times & blaze down the other side :kaching:

    'Born to ride!'
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonez3113 View Post
    So I have been practicing and can get up onto the seat part of a standard picnic bench. Found I need a bit of speed. But the rear tire seams to just bang against the bench, rather than clear it. Mentally having an issue putting the lifting of the rear tire while the front tire is doing its thing...any advice?
    Watch the second video of the "punch" move as he calls it. Pay attention to what he's calling the explosion, which happens as soon as the front wheel arrives on top of the obstacle. This creates the movement of the rear wheel up and over. Basically, the hop or energy burst happens from the front wheel up position just like a regular American bunny hop, but you have both wheels supported when you do it. Timing is important and the faster you go the quicker the things all have to happen.

  23. #23
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    The faster you go, the smaller the window is to get your rear up!

    Those videos make it look so easy. I've seen guys roll up 4 foot rock faces like it's nothing. I start struggling once it's higher than my bb.

  24. #24
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    If you're riding flat pedals, try tightening your grip on your bars a bit. This increases the "pressure" against your foot/pedal contact. Sounds strange, but it works.

    The ability to lift your back wheel with your feet is a trick unto itself. Practice by rolling at a medium pace, lean over your stem and lightly unweight your back wheel while at the same time sort of curling your feet on your pedals and lifting up. There's a dynamic to this action that translates directly in to bunnyhops, and is key to getting your back wheel predictably off the ground.

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  25. #25
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    The whole thing is really just a bunny hop, but timed different. Sort of.

    I built some very small wooden "features" in my backyard. Just gotta practice. I got all the motions down, and I can bunny hop like no ones business... still struggle like crazy pulling my bike up onto ledges/rocks/tables. Its hard!

    That jeff lenosky video is pretty crazy. He makes it look so easy!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Baird View Post
    Pay attention to what he's calling the explosion, which happens as soon as the front wheel arrives on top of the obstacle.
    Once you get onto larger obstacles you will make it very hard if you put your front wheel on top of the obstacle.
    As I explained above, you want your front wheel to hit the top corner on the vertical, not on the flat horizontal.

    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    The whole thing is really just a bunny hop, but timed different. Sort of.
    The movement is similar. But most related to a hop while on your back wheel. The difference looks subtle. But is quite different because of the dynamics.
    One has your front wheel in a static position, and the other uses the momentum of your front wheel still rising.

  27. #27
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    Try this and apply / adjust as needed.

    Find an isolated strip of road w/ sidewalk. Parking lot, bike shop etc. Coast off of the curbing onto the road, then - work up to coasting and shifting body weight until you have both wheels landing on the roadway equally.

    Small shift forward to propel the bike, then - full arm extension and moving hips behind the saddle to maintain momentum and also keep the bike level.

    Next - while seated coast up to the same curbing and instead find a gear combination which makes the bike want to snap forward and become lighter on the front. Use this leading-foot application of crank input to keep the bike level upon landing.

    Once the ability of the crankset used in partial rotation as a correction-device as opposed to an acceleration enabler is adjusted-to you will appreciate it and keeping your body mass over the bike center as an enabler of propulsion.
    I like Sand - I don't like Witches


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