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  1. #1
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    What are some good hardtails with at least 140 travel?

    Hey guys I was convinced yesterday that my first mountain bike should be a hardtail because it will help me build experience, so I'm just wondering if you guys know any good hardtails that can shred as much as a FS. My maximum range for a bike is $2,000, but you can list some that are over if you want. I want a hardtail that has at least 130 travel, but I prefer 140 and up because from my research that travel is mainly for all mountain. Please help, thanks!

    Also what's the better wheel size for a hardtail? 26, 27.5, or 29er?

  2. #2
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    On-One 456C. Cheap, durable and fun. I've had one for a few years [bought the frame, built it up with spare bits], and I have really enjoyed the ride. I often use it for hauling tools for trail building duty.

  3. #3
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    Thanks man that's a good price! I look into it!

  4. #4
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    Transition Transam, Chromag Rootdown, Trek Stache, Cannfield Brothers Yelli Screamy all fit the bill.

    Transam starts at $1900 with a solid build kit. I have one I built up and am still upgrading as funds allow and it is a great bike. More fun than the full suspension I was riding previously. Just my opinion, not a fact.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkrobe View Post
    On-One 456C. Cheap, durable and fun. I've had one for a few years [bought the frame, built it up with spare bits], and I have really enjoyed the ride. I often use it for hauling tools for trail building duty.
    I would also recommend you to look into the 456 Evo2, or the 45650b for a more future proof build. Similar specs, but the steel is more compliant than the carbon. The compliance will definitely be welcomed to take out more of the chatter. Pinkrobe, I only have substantial ride time on the steel Evo2; how is the stiffness of the carbon? I'm sure tires/pressure also play pretty big role, too.

    That being said, OP, are you cool with 26" wheels, or do you want 27.5" or 29"? There are tons of options in 26" and 29", but there are more options popping up for 27.5"

  6. #6
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    To be honest I have no clue!

  7. #7
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    Since this is your first mountain bike do you know where and what type of terrain you will be riding?

    Long Climbs and descents?
    Rolling terrain with tight twisty stuff?
    Rooty and Rocky or Smooth and Flowy?
    All trail or will you have Fire road climbs?
    Any pavement on way to trail?

    If your not usre yet and just want to get out and ride and see what you really enjoy a HT with 140mm travel may not be best palce to start. Might be all depends.

    Have you talked to any local riders or local bike shops to see what they recommend?
    XC, Road, XXC, Endurance, Mtn, All-Mtn, Cross, Gravel, just go have fun on 2 wheels!

  8. #8
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    I'll be riding on the Appalachian trails in Boone, NC.

  9. #9
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    I'd go for a Yelli Screamy if budget allows. It's the king of sporty hardtail trail bikes, and a very rad name to go with it. It differs from other bikes in its category by how maneuverable it is. It has big wheels to roll super fast, but it handles a lot like a spry 26er. There are videos of people riding everything from XC to dirt jump parks with them. Just Google Canfield bike reviews and you'll see how well-liked the company and their bikes are. A Yelli Screamy can be built up within your budget if you're smart, and you'll have one of the most coveted hardtails money can buy.
    tangaroo: What electrolytes do chicken and turkey have again?
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  10. #10
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    Never ridden Boone area but have ridden some PisgaH trails and ride up in GW on western end of VA.

    My advice:
    - Visit a local shop get some advice, but put some emphasis on your budget
    - Learning on a HT is great but nothing wrong with Full Suspension
    - I wouldnt tie into 140mm of travel at all you might be fine with a cross country Hardtail or something less than 140mm

    Being new to the sport and having 2k to spend on a bike will get you something that you can grow into, amazing what that gets you now a days.

    Two models you can likely find locally would be:

    Trek stache Stache 7 - Trek Bicycle
    Gian Trance Trance X 29er 2 (2014) | Giant Bicycles | United States

    A good suggestion on a XC bike in your range:

    Specialized Bicycle Components

    Also make sure you have the other equipment you will need, pedals, shoes, helmet, and good riding shorts!

    Most of all enjoy, a lot of people will tell you that you need to demo a lot of bikes and see what fits best. Very good advice but not 100% necessary, since this is your first mountian bike I wouldn't spend a lot of time demoing find a good shop set a limit and they will work with you, don't spend a lot of time trying bike after bike, instead narrow down to 2 or 3 and just ride as muuch as possible and make small adjustments to your bike a little at a time.
    XC, Road, XXC, Endurance, Mtn, All-Mtn, Cross, Gravel, just go have fun on 2 wheels!

  11. #11
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    I've been running my Yelli Screamy with 650B wheels and a 160mm 650B fork. Its a trail slayer. If I was in the market for a new AM hardtail that 456 EVO would be on my short list. That's a lot of bike for the $

    On-One 456 Evo2 Sram X9 Mountain Bike | On - One
    No moss...

  12. #12
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    id get this. maybe change out the shifters...

    KONA BIKES | 2014 BIKES | TRAIL DS | PRECEPT DL

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  13. #13
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    Glad to see you're narrowing down your search based on that other thread you started about FS. It's an exciting time to shop for a bike. There are so many these days. I've never had a hardtail all mountain, but I wanted to suggest looking at that stickied thread where people share pics of their all mtn hardtails. Lots of window shopping and ideas to be had in there.

    The All Mountain Hardtail Thread. Post up yours.

    Oh and Niner has a steel 29er they just came out with called a Ros 9. No idea what it's like, but no one's mentioned it yet. You can probably get it for cheaper than the top of the line build spec the following article lists.
    http://www.vitalmtb.com/product/guid...with-XO1,12696
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  14. #14
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    +1 for the On One 456 Evo II.... Just finished my build (under $1000 mix of new and used) and I couldn't be happier. I came from a full sus xc bike and don't regret it one bit

  15. #15
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    I'm on my 5th all mountain hardtail- a 456 evo 2. I really like it- it's an exact copy of a frame i built for myself a couple years ago. (no kidding! same angles, lengths, tube sizes..!) I rode long travel hardtails exclusively for my first 4 or so years of mountain biking.

    I've had a bunch of FS bikes now too, but when i ride them i can tell my technique and riding style was influenced by spending so much time getting super comfortable on hardtails... and i'm not sure I'd choose to learn on a hardtail necessarily.

    I live in San Jose, CA, and our local trails can be really steep (and the bigger/slacker AM-HT front end is a godsend), but they're generally very smooth except for the short sections where they're not. You can rest your weight on the rear end for long stretches of trail, and then either shift your weight and jump or 'float' through the rocks. Back then I naively took my hardtails afield and kinda suffered in Tahoe, really suffered at downieville, and rode my 6" DS bike in Moab and pitied my continually exhausted and slow friend on his ragley blue pig. Those places just had chunkier trails that didn't give you a chance to rest. That's a wordy way to say your trails dictate the best bike, not the other way around. Chat with a bunch of locals and get a consensus. Then try to get something similar and just a little nicer than your main riding buddy's.

    As for the best models and wheel size... i see those things as related. I HATE riding a bike that won't balance right, and that's all about the rear end. I gotta
    -be able to lift the front end and hold it there a moment while descending, to manage drops and lips on jumps
    -not understeer when i'm in the attack position
    -pedal up hill without the front end wandering around excessively


    In general, AM style frames manage that to varying success, and in my experience XC and jumper frames consciously forfeit one attribute for strength in another. It's not the travel, it's the design. I don't really know who among the big manufacturers is building frames that suit my priories at the moment, but i know it's what drives people towards the small-production builders. (i have a steel canfield and a steel on-one, for example)

    The smaller the wheels are, the EASIER it is to design the frame to get that balance right. Big wheels encourage the designer to push the rider kinda forward on the bike, so it takes a conscious effort to make a nimble 29er, like the aforementioned Canfield or Chromag. In general, I wouldn't know if a bike had 26" wheels and good tires, or 27", but the 29's have a different feel in the front end.

    I'd put a real premium on getting Shimano brakes and a fork with a quality damper, too. Those things can be more important for a new rider's confidence than anything.

    Thanks for reading to here!
    .

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarolinaPanthers View Post
    I would also recommend you to look into the 456 Evo2, or the 45650b for a more future proof build. Similar specs, but the steel is more compliant than the carbon. The compliance will definitely be welcomed to take out more of the chatter. Pinkrobe, I only have substantial ride time on the steel Evo2; how is the stiffness of the carbon? I'm sure tires/pressure also play pretty big role, too.
    My 456C has 2.4 tires front and rear, so that's where 99% of the compliance comes from. That said, the frame is not uncomfortable. I have thrown on a set of skinny tires at 80psi for commuter duty while my other commuter [steel frame] was in the stand, and was quite pleased with the 456 through the usual potholes and various road debris. Overall, it's stiff through the BB and a joy to ride.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by patmckman View Post
    Hey guys I was convinced yesterday that my first mountain bike should be a hardtail because it will help me build experience, so I'm just wondering if you guys know any good hardtails that can shred as much as a FS. My maximum range for a bike is $2,000, but you can list some that are over if you want. I want a hardtail that has at least 130 travel, but I prefer 140 and up because from my research that travel is mainly for all mountain. Please help, thanks!

    Also what's the better wheel size for a hardtail? 26, 27.5, or 29er?
    Your $2000 budget limits choices but allows a Kona Honzo but with less fork travel. I see some Honzo owners do have longer forks. I'm not seeing the need for more fork with mine because when the 120 mm fork is not pleasant I think same for it being a hard tail.

    Wheel size is personal. The Honzo changed my mind on wanting to own a 29r but the axle height is still higher so something you notice at times. The big wheels also make it better in the rough stuff. It's really an overgrown version of my DJ/park style bike. I've used both in same places and they both create a list of pros and cons for different circumstances. I've tried 650Bs and like them too.

  18. #18
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    456 carbon vs. steel. I have both (need to get rid of one). Both are built pretty similar. The steel 456 is the previous version to the Evo. Rides nice, but not the most compliant steel bike I have used. The carbon is a bit more stiff, but oh so light. I am actually less beat up after an hour ride on the carbon as compared to the steel. I think this is because it is noticeably lighter and I am able to "float" over some rocks more easily. The carbon tubing is VERY thin, so I am not certain which frame would last longer.

    Not certain which I will keep, but leaning towards the carbon. Did I say it was light?

  19. #19
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    I started riding 3 years ago and my first bike was full suspension. I've since picked up an all-mountain hardtail and absolutely love it, I might even prefer it.

    BUT (!) I'm not sure I would have stuck with mountain biking if it hadn't been for that full squish. They're really amazing magical things when you're just starting out.

  20. #20
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    My new Yelli Screamy with Xfusion trace set at 140mm. Really handles like a dream.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What are some good hardtails with at least 140 travel?-imag0072.jpg  

    What are some good hardtails with at least 140 travel?-imag0068.jpg  


  21. #21
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    Having not tried a Yelli I'd say 45650b gets the coin, it is good. Seat tube angle is great for climbs, the head angle rips.. it has taken a beating and holding up well

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