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  1. #1
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    At what point dose Trail end and All Moutain begin

    Sitin' around pondering a new tire set up for spring during our first big snow storm of the year(12" to18"+) and waffling Between 2.3 or 2.1 up front.Got me thinking....

    If All Mountain is some were between XC and Free ride and Trail is some were between XC and All Mountain. At what point dose Trail end and All Mountain begin?

    You see my current setup is kind of a mullet if you will a 2.25 Ardent tubeless up front and a 2.1 aspen exp. (summer) on the rear on my TranceX w/ 140 Talas fork and works OK for my local New England trails.Both worn out now and driffty is a understatement!
    My new tire picks are down to WTB Bronson's 2.3/2.1 or 2.1/2.1 or Conti 2011 Mountain kings 2.2/2.2 Not a lot of reviews on the Bronson's and the king are not out yet.
    Any thoughts on either?

    Sorry for the Enigma and question in one post.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly
    Sitin' around pondering a new tire set up for spring during our first big snow storm of the year(12" to18"+) and waffling Between 2.3 or 2.1 up front.Got me thinking....

    If All Mountain is some were between XC and Free ride and Trail is some were between XC and All Mountain. At what point dose Trail end and All Mountain begin?

    You see my current setup is kind of a mullet if you will a 2.25 Ardent tubeless up front and a 2.1 aspen exp. (summer) on the rear on my TranceX w/ 140 Talas fork and works OK for my local New England trails.Both worn out now and driffty is a understatement!
    My new tire picks are down to WTB Bronson's 2.3/2.1 or 2.1/2.1 or Conti 2011 Mountain kings 2.2/2.2 Not a lot of reviews on the Bronson's and the king are not out yet.
    Any thoughts on either?

    Sorry for the Enigma and question in one post.
    Wherever you say it does. The borders are very blurry.
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  3. #3
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    Its a question that has been plaguing man for centuries. The great minds on this board have determined there is no answer and it up to each individual to determine his own path to an All Mountain ride.

  4. #4
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    Thats why these picture threads are so important, because of all the diversity in setups.

  5. #5
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    If you're running a 32mm fork you're most certainly trail bike. Also, 140mm of travel for the most part is considered trail...in my opinion.

    Go with the WTB for sure, Conti's are gonna slip n slide on everything.

  6. #6
    I got the velcros
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    Always had good luck with Contis and really bad luck with WTB (tires).

    As a blanket statement for not knowing what kind of conditions you ride in, a 2.35 or similar is pretty much the ideal setup for "all mountain" riding, whatever that actually means to you.

  7. #7
    usually cranky
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    people who have 2.3 bronsons seem to love em. ive heard 2.2 tk's are a lesser quality rubber than the 2.4s but im not sure. as far as trail vs am my take is that trail is smoother single track with some rocks and roots and am is more tech throughout. where i ride i would say it is a mix of trail and am. gettin snow here on the cape too and im bummed, want to ride so bad!

  8. #8
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    That's a good post. I think AM begins the moment you are dropping anything over 3ft to flat or jumping where your wheels are flying over 3ft vertical distance on a trail with roots over 1 inch high and more than 30 percent uneven rock surface. Trail riding would be the same conditions as above but with drops to flat or vertical distance on jumps of less than 3ft. at least that's what I think

  9. #9
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    Most of the local trails in the lower CT.are a full mix of everything. fireroad,tight single track, rocks,roots,hard pack,loam,pines, gravel,logs,granite spines,steeps, climbs, drops everything except sugar sand and goat heads.Typically in multi use land holds of a couple hundred acres. So not a lot of 20'+ gap jumps,endless tech rides with huge vistas or epic all day rides.(we do have Dioblo tho) Plus I do ride in upstate NY in the Adirondacks, far more epic days when lighter is better but traction is key.
    So as far as tires I've a set of Minion2.35 dhf /high roller for the the down hill and park stuff The ardent/aspen set. Some Kenda nev's Stick e dtc combo(read slow) and SB 8s and WTB Exiwolf mostly for the hard tail.
    I'm thinking the Bronsons 2.1 F&R might just fit the bill .Just on the fence if I should keep the mullet set up (allmountain up front and XC in the back) for my local trails.I may just have to wait it out till more review pile up.

    Knee2 I'm really thinking the three foot mark hits the nail square on the head for the Trail to AM quandary.
    Last edited by Dragonfly; 12-26-2010 at 07:24 PM.

  10. #10
    Ridin bikes is fun
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    What's All Mountain, here you go. A 6" bike is the sweet spot. But it's not all about the bike. I have a 4" cross country bike that I can and have ridden on what would be considered All Mountain trails. Back in the day when I was racing I could make it up the hill much faster than most (not all) All Mountain riders. On the way down I had to pick my lines carefully and sometimes take alternate lines when things get chunky. On my 6" bike it's the opposite slower going up and much faster on the way down.
    Many people like 7" bikes and bigger. They give up slightly more on the up's and can hit bigger stuff on the way down.

    So my opinion is that it's not the bike so much and the way you want to ride the trail.

    Here's a pic of myself on what I would call an All Mountain trail on my 4" bike the second pic is of me doing a drop on my 6" bike that I wouldn't think of doing on my 4" bike.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails At what point dose Trail end and All Moutain begin-untitled.jpg  

    At what point dose Trail end and All Moutain begin-untitled1.jpg  

    Last edited by surfndav; 12-26-2010 at 11:20 PM.
    Better than most, not as good as some.

  11. #11
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    AM starts the minute you finish slamming your Mountain Dew Red Bull cocktail while listening to the soundtrack to Lone Wolf McQuade.

  12. #12
    Hmmmmm
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Wherever you say it does. The borders are very blurry.
    Yep, I have to agree with Shiggy on this one.
    Those of us that have been riding for over a decade, used to call "All Mountain" bikes "Trail Bikes".
    I'm still not really happy with the invention of the term "All Mountain".
    We were taking heavy duty XC bikes and beefing them up with heavier duty rims and tires years ago, and we called them trail bikes. Then the industry came along and said "Oooooo, that's getting popular, lets copy that and change the name, so it sounds like we invented it".

    OK, maybe that's a little sarcastic, even for me, but the point is basically true.

    Eric.
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    Peace and Long Rides...

  13. #13
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    Buy a U-turn Lyrik, and start winding it down, mm by mm while riding your favorite trail. At the point when you feel like pulling on tight clothes and chugging a latte - that's trail.

  14. #14
    Hmmmmm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Buy a U-turn Lyrik, and start winding it down, mm by mm while riding your favorite trail. At the point when you feel like pulling on tight clothes and chugging a latte - that's trail.
    Sounds more like a rodie on a mountain bike.
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
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    Peace and Long Rides...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar
    Sounds more like a rodie on a mountain bike.
    Precisely.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Buy a U-turn Lyrik, and start winding it down, mm by mm while riding your favorite trail. At the point when you feel like pulling on tight clothes and chugging a latte - that's trail.
    Personally, I am trying to push things as far as I can, WITHOUT having to wear anything but my tight cycling apparel... and concerning the latte, the only way to go is a stiff espresso.

  17. #17
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    In regards to trail vs AM.... the best thing to do is not get pigeon holed into the categories the manufacturers have come up with. Find a bike that works for you and matches the terrain you ride. Lets face it, most people end up with more than one bike anyway.

  18. #18
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    Trail is included in *ALL* mountain... all mountain starts at XC and includes everything up to DH. It's an all mountain bike not a riding style, how many times do we have to go over this.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkslide18
    AM starts the minute you finish slamming your Mountain Dew Red Bull cocktail while listening to the soundtrack to Lone Wolf McQuade.
    yes. stay thirsty my friends

  20. #20
    "No Clue Crew"
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    I take my All Mountain with cream and sugar.

  21. #21
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    people who have 2.3 bronsons seem to love em. ive heard 2.2 tk's are a lesser quality rubber than the 2.4s but im not sure. as far as trail vs am my take is that trail is smoother single track with some rocks and roots and am is more tech throughout. where i ride i would say it is a mix of trail and am. gettin snow here on the cape too and im bummed, want to ride so bad!
    The UST Trail King 2.2 does not use the Black Chili compound. All other 26" versions do use the better rubber.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dumbaSS
    Trail is included in *ALL* mountain... all mountain starts at XC and includes everything up to DH. It's an all mountain bike not a riding style, how many times do we have to go over this.
    Jack of all trades doesnt have quite the ring as ALL MOUNTAIN. But yeah, I agree AM is a type of bike. Not a style of riding.

  23. #23
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar
    Yep, I have to agree with Shiggy on this one.
    Those of us that have been riding for over a decade, used to call "All Mountain" bikes "Trail Bikes".
    I'm still not really happy with the invention of the term "All Mountain".
    We were taking heavy duty XC bikes and beefing them up with heavier duty rims and tires years ago, and we called them trail bikes. Then the industry came along and said "Oooooo, that's getting popular, lets copy that and change the name, so it sounds like we invented it".

    OK, maybe that's a little sarcastic, even for me, but the point is basically true.

    Eric.
    And for those of us that have been riding for more than 20 years, we called them "mountain bikes."
    mtbtires.com
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  24. #24
    Stiff yet compliant
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    When you put down the Fresca and pick up a Mountain Dew.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    And for those of us that have been riding for more than 20 years, we called them "mountain bikes."
    I liked it when they were called ATB's (All-Terrain Bicycles). It made me feel powerful.

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