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  1. #26
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    I ride my SB66 to the trailhead all the time. Don't see the point in driving the car if I have the time and opportunity to just pedal there. But since I want my SB66 to perform well on the "nasty downhills and really rough trails", I put big grippy tires on it and don't worry about them being slow on pavement. I want the bike to perform best at its full potential, rather than compromise the capabilities of a very expensive piece of equipment by outfitting it with subpar components. You and I, it would appear, live in very different worlds.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZomblibulaX View Post
    But since I want my SB66 to perform well on the "nasty downhills and really rough trails", I put big grippy tires on it and don't worry about them being slow on pavement.
    This is the best answer. Ride the bike wherever you want, just don't ruin it by putting crappy tires on it. If you want to be fast in the woods, then your bike is perfect. If you want to be fast on the road, get a different bike. No bike is going to the best at everything, regardless of tires.

  3. #28
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    Get yourself some Maxxis tires. High roller for the back, minion for the front.
    Order the highest durometer number ( 60A) to increase durability for pavement.

    Get a 2.35/2.40 width.

    My mojo HD ( very similar bike compared to your Yeti), came with XC tires that made the bike very skitterish in the "nasty trail" areas.

    I changed the tires to bigger ,knobbier tires and the bike performed much better overall.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefool808 View Post
    This is the best answer. Ride the bike wherever you want, just don't ruin it by putting crappy tires on it. If you want to be fast in the woods, then your bike is perfect. If you want to be fast on the road, get a different bike. No bike is going to the best at everything, regardless of tires.
    I don't want a tire thats the fastest on the road, i want a tire that does not drag as much and does not wear out the center right away. Something more suited to dry ground. I don't ride in mud. No fun for me. I guess i'll just leave the Advents on for now.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    I don't want a tire thats the fastest on the road, i want a tire that does not drag as much and does not wear out the center right away. Something more suited to dry ground. I don't ride in mud. No fun for me. I guess i'll just leave the Advents on for now.
    I think you have your tire compounds and their use mixed up a bit. Soft compound does not mean it is for mud, mud tires are widely spaced knobs to avoid packing. Hardpack/fireroad tires have smaller lower profile knobs usually spaced closely together. Some riders pick this variant in a softer compound to gain performance on the downhills and others pick a harder for longer longevity. However the "nasty downhills and really rough trails" don't usually treat these type of tires very well. They will get pinch flats, loose grip, and get thrown around at high speeds through rock gardens. You also usually loose some braking and technical climbing grip with the harder smaller knobs. You are going to have to settle with losing performance on either the paved area or the rough areas.

    Of course you can also make it like your M5, not exactly the greatest car for everyday use, but also not the best for the track days. However it just sits nicely in the middle, gets you around town and when you want to have fun it has enough umph to rattle your bones a bit. That would be the more aggressive XC racing tires for the bike.

  6. #31
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    Ray Knight, I think the negativity in this thread comes from the fact that people understood that you are ONLY using the bike for easy trails like the ones in the picture.

    Like you, I use my mtn bike for far more things than bikepark riding including pavement riding.
    Like you, I have a non practical sports car for everyday use, but then I take it to the track very few days a year. The thing is that when I take it to the track, I like having the best tires for the track. I rather drive it everyday with the same loud, uncomfortable tires and have it ready for track.

    The same applies for my bike. I have a front aggresive tire: a Schwalbe Hans Dampf, 2.35. Great all around tire, rolls fine for a 2.35. My rear tire is a 2.2 Continental Trail King, which rolls much faster.

    My suggestion is find a front tire that lets you have fun on those days in the big mountain. Fand a rear tire that rolls, but still allows you to have fun and prevent punctures, which is the main problem with lighter tires. This way you'll notice much better rolling on pavement and easy trails.

    Will the tires wear faster?? yes, but you have an M5. You'll afford it.

  7. #32
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    I don't want a tire thats the fastest on the road, i want a tire that does not drag as much and does not wear out the center right away. Something more suited to dry ground. I don't ride in mud. No fun for me. I guess i'll just leave the Advents on for now.
    Schwalbe Smart Sam 2.25. Rolls well with aggressive edge knobs, long wearing.

    But you are generally better off with several sets of tires and swap for the conditions.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  8. #33
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    This is kind of an awesome thread.

    So I ride my bike to the trails. Sometimes by miles, I may spend half the ride on the road - that would be my lunch ride, for example. But the point of the ride is to go mountain biking. So yes, I'm wearing out my fancy MTB tires on pavement. But when I get to the trail, I have the tires I really want. Fancy cars are well out my price range, but it's worth it to me to replace my fancy tires a little more often if I get the ride I want on the trail. (And I do.)

    If you do some 100% pavement rides, just get a damn road bike. They really are better at that job.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #34
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    try some specialized ground controls, i am running the grid tubliss casing on the rear of my enduro and have no resistance issues on pavement grinds and it is wearing really well.
    i have a hans dampf up front that is doing great too. i may not ride 10+ miles to the trail head, but i do a weekly ride that has at least 4 miles of pavement mixed in with all kinds of different single track. the ground control front and rear has also been a good combo for some friends of mine.
    Juice

  10. #35
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    Wow I came back to this thread and it really took off! Sorry for the first comment. I seem to understand better on what you're doing and I agree with you, if you only want one bike to do it all might as well get what you really want, I didn't mean to bag at all. How about something like a Kenda Small Block 8 in the rear with say a Kenda Nevegal up front? I think that's what I would run if I had to ride a lot of road or hard pack to the trailhead. Smaller knobs with less resistance on the rear and a good knobby tire up front for some good cornering. Most of your wear and rolling resistance comes from your rear because of your weight and pedaling force, I don't think a Nevegal would hurt you too bad on the road at all.

  11. #36
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Thanks for all the advice guys! I was thinking the opposite of what a lot of you are saying on the front and rear and it makes sense that most weight is on the rear tire. For now i'm running the Advents at 55psi (was running 35psi before) and it makes a world of difference on rolling. I bombed some rocky powerline trails today and an old MX track and no flats yet. Lol. I think mostly the 2.4 tires are just too wide and i can go a little narrower and be fine. Now to weed through all the good suggestions on tires!

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikethenbeer View Post
    It's not so much that you have a mountain bike that you are using on pavement/fire roads, nor is it that you have a full suspension mountain that you are using on pavement/fire roads. It's that you have that mountain bike for pavement/fire roads. 26" wheels, carbon frame, slack head tube angle, what looks like 150mm or more travel. I mean, money and doing whatever the **** you want with it aside, would you buy a 36 inch, 120 cc chain saw to trim your pubes? I mean, they'll both work, but, each activity would be much more enjoyable with a carbon, full suspension, cross country, 29er with slicks and a cordless lithium ion powered norelco beard trimmer.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Pretty funny!

  13. #38
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Pretty funny!
    Well he was kindly calling me a dumbass so i did not find it very funny.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    Well he was kindly calling me a dumbass so i did not find it very funny.
    Welcome to the Forums btw, don't ever take things too seriously as most things are written for comedy and not actually direct personal insults. You got to admit the chainsaw and pubes thing was funny.

  15. #40
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2clue View Post
    Welcome to the Forums btw, don't ever take things too seriously as most things are written for comedy and not actually direct personal insults. You got to admit the chainsaw and pubes thing was funny.
    Yeah it was pretty funny. I'm no noob to forums lol. I know how it goes! Some guys are helpful and some are rude and judging. Its all good i have thick skin.

  16. #41
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Ended up adding a road bike to the stable anyways!


  17. #42
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    Kenda K-Rad are pretty good, they are cheap, slide some , but are good for road. I ride a lot of hard packed single track trail, and even if they slip it doesn't affect the ride too much, but I don't usually top 8 mph.

  18. #43
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    Re: What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    Ended up adding a road bike to the stable anyways!
    That's the way to do it. Now you have no reason not to commit to awesome MTB tires.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  19. #44
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    What is a good intermediate terrain 26" tire with good road manners?

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    That's the way to do it. Now you have no reason not to commit to awesome MTB tires.
    That and i never realized how much faster you can go on a road bike haha. Still most trails i ride are hardpack gravel and no mud so i am running continental traffic tires on the Yeti for now and they work really well on the trails.

  20. #45
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    i ride on the street a lot, thats why i use $20 Kenda Excavators. theyre cheap but still grip really good on all kinds of terrain

    OP, nice bikes!
    2010 GT Avalanche Expert

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    That and i never realized how much faster you can go on a road bike haha.
    Yeah, it is really hard to understand until you have one. Slicks on an MTB (even with lockouts) are just not the same as any half decent road bike.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Knight View Post
    That and i never realized how much faster you can go on a road bike haha. Still most trails i ride are hardpack gravel and no mud so i am running continental traffic tires on the Yeti for now and they work really well on the trails.
    Put some 25mm tires on that road bike, run a slightly lower pressure and you will be riding pretty much any type of road you'd like. Don't whimp out on exploring the gravel/hardpack roads on a road bike. Plenty of fun to be had with that combo.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2clue View Post
    Put some 25mm tires on that road bike, run a slightly lower pressure and you will be riding pretty much any type of road you'd like. Don't whimp out on exploring the gravel/hardpack roads on a road bike. Plenty of fun to be had with that combo.
    I will no longer even consider going smaller than 28mm.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I will no longer even consider going smaller than 28mm.
    Are you running 28 all around or just front? I was thinking about this combo, my only concern is the added rolling resistance on the road and tire clearance. I would love the combo for exploring the goat roads though.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2clue View Post
    Are you running 28 all around or just front? I was thinking about this combo, my only concern is the added rolling resistance on the road and tire clearance. I would love the combo for exploring the goat roads though.
    I am running 33's front and back right now (Jack Brown Green Label by Rivendell).

    Larger volume is not more rolling resistance. It really depends more on the tread. These Jack Browns roll just as well as the 23mm Conti Gatorskins they replaced. And I will ride these happily over gravel/dirt roads and the crappiest pavement out there.

    Of course a lot of road bikes won't take anything over 28.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

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