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  1. #1
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    What is the best 6" travel all mountain bike

    I am looking to buy a new bike so what would you say is the best 6" travel bike, would like ajustable travel on the front i.e. 110-150 and would like it under 30 pounds in weight. Been looking at specialized enduro 08.Do a lot of cross country but like to do a bit of freeride and downhill aswell.Would like lock out on the back too.

  2. #2
    I am a pathetic rider...
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    there is no "best" without knowing more specifics about your riding style or your budget or you in general(height, weight, etc) we can't reccomend a bike, that being said, the enduro is a pretty good place to start.
    Save the Earth, Ride a Cyclist

  3. #3
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    I am 5`10 weighing about 13 1/2 stone and my riding style is aggressive crosscountry with a budget of £1400 for a new or second hand off ebay.

  4. #4
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    I'd be looking at a Commencal Meta 5.5. Huge amount of bike for the money (UK).

  5. #5
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    The "best" bike is the one you really feel fit with, make you happy, riding more with grin ear to ear, minimum hassle (like less maintenance time due to issues on the components, the important factor for wet riding area like England), the one you feel more of positive side and conceal the compromise from whatever system the bike has. It should match yor riding style and the trail you mostly ride.

    Today suspension system has narrowed the gap to cover wider spread of riding style and terrain. A good thing for us the rider. However, you still have to test ride as possible as you can to get the best bike for you. Your best may not be other people best. You could still do the search in this forum to tap other people choice closer to your need.

    Your Enduro is a good tried and proven bike with FSR system that has been tweaked and tune to suit bike geometry and shock technology. There are later system like VPP or DW Link that people like and get more hype than FSR.
    Good luck on your search.

  6. #6
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    With the Specialized Enduro im Sure they have had alot of trouble with their own brand Forks and shocks, best to do some research on them before you buy. I was in your shoes a few months back and looked at a good few bikes. It sounds like you very similar to me with a change of riding styles and also i live in Wales.

    There were a few options i looked at, Trek Remedy, Commencal and LaPierre but i went with the Cube Fritzz in the end. I got an 08 model so got a discount of £300 which brought it down to £1500. The Trouble is tha Cube have now increased their prices buy £300 so the 09 Fritzzz is now £2100. I know there is a second hand one on ebay built more for downhilling atm and its starting price is £1250

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Cube-Fritzz-do...1%7C240%3A1318

    hope this helps?
    If your not falling off, your not riding fast enough!

    Cube Fritzz 2008

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  7. #7
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    No offense, but I'm starting to hate all these "whats the best" questions. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
    This is a very subjective matter and its up to your own preference and opinion. BTW, I've been wanting an ipod nano for quite a while now, but whats the best possible color out there?

  8. #8
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    Realistically, it could very well be the GT Force Carbon... I ride an I-Drive (2006) and the system is just amazing.

  9. #9
    AllMountain+CwmcarnUplift
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    Quote Originally Posted by bizzy930
    No offense, but I'm starting to hate all these "whats the best" questions. AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
    This is a very subjective matter and its up to your own preference and opinion. BTW, I've been wanting an ipod nano for quite a while now, but whats the best possible color out there?


    Listen mate! I understand you not liking "whats the best" questions but, When Im buyin a new bike with my cash, (which I work damn hard for) I like to know everyones opinion on every last component of that bike so that I dont waste my money, Granted everyones likes and dislikes are different but they are opinions all the while.

    So if you dont want to read or reply to the post dont open it in the 1st place (the thread title isnt misleading "it does what it says on the tin"), there are lots of other threads on many other different subjects that you can read and reply to. You could even waste your time and start a thread all about this subject and whine about the people that ask the question "whats the best".

    So to Jabba. Ask any question you want b/c these forums are all about helping out. and like i have metioned when parting with your cash you need all the help and advice you can get
    If your not falling off, your not riding fast enough!

    Cube Fritzz 2008

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  10. #10
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    i use my 09 stumpjumper for all mountain riding, i just threw on some downhill minions and i feel like i can tackle anything, within reason of course i dont go hucking the bike off drops its not intended for but gnarly terrain rocky steeps aggressive downhill trails and small jumps and obsticals are no problem for me on this bike

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIESELindustry


    Listen mate! I understand you not liking "whats the best" questions but, When Im buyin a new bike with my cash, (which I work damn hard for) I like to know everyones opinion on every last component of that bike so that I dont waste my money, Granted everyones likes and dislikes are different but they are opinions all the while.

    So if you dont want to read or reply to the post dont open it in the 1st place (the thread title isnt misleading "it does what it says on the tin"), there are lots of other threads on many other different subjects that you can read and reply to. You could even waste your time and start a thread all about this subject and whine about the people that ask the question "whats the best".

    So to Jabba. Ask any question you want b/c these forums are all about helping out. and like i have metioned when parting with your cash you need all the help and advice you can get
    O lighten up there old man, didn't mean to give you more gray hair. You know as well as I do that vague questions like "whats the best bike" can't be answered by anyone else other then the person asking it. Now if the OP wanted to ask a question comparing lets say between two types of bikes or so, then that's a whole different story.

    Since I don't want to come across as a total a**, here's my contribution. Jabba, I was at my LBS not too long ago looking at the Pitch Pro but they insist that I give the Enduro Comp a try, so I did. Aside from a little weight difference, the Enduro definitely felt more supple and the geometry seems more comfortable. While you're at it, take a look at the Reign and Khyber!

  12. #12
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    good morning all
    week ago i buy two new bikes meta 5.5.3. 08 for my wife and lapierre spicy 316 08 for me . yesterday was the test for them we went to trail that is climbing a litle more then 210 meters in 1km .must say i made it lapierre climbs like a goat, no need to lever or lock the fork (fox 36 van) and descend was poetry speed was double then ever before and much more controlabile. i highly recomend

  13. #13
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    I dont think you are going to get the best six inch all mountain bike with that budget. I would say the best would be either the new tracer vp, or the knolly endorphin ( i know the knolly is 5.5 inches of travel....but still)

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    I would check out the Santa Cruz Nomad, the Trek Remedy, and the Cannondale Moto.

  15. #15
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    If you're riding XC, why do you need 6" and why are people recommending bikes on the edge of FR?

  16. #16
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    Leftover Cannondale Prophet 3Z.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    If you're riding XC, why do you need 6" and why are people recommending bikes on the edge of FR?

    Marketing hype/brainwash

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    If you're riding XC, why do you need 6" and why are people recommending bikes on the edge of FR?
    The OP did say:
    "Do a lot of cross country but like to do a bit of freeride and downhill aswell."
    so that's why

  19. #19
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    The op's question indicates lots of things that say he/she is an xcer that thinks they do FR by riding over sticks and pointing the bike down 5 ft once in a while. What would someone want a lockout for unless they were XC and overstating the riding they do?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    The op's question indicates lots of things that say he/she is an xcer that thinks they do FR by riding over sticks and pointing the bike down 5 ft once in a while. What would someone want a lockout for unless they were XC and overstating the riding they do?
    a bit harsh but granted lots of people over state their riding - based on what trails you rode in the US , some threads you started and the type of riding you did, were you not way over biked yourself on the RFX when basically the flux would have got the job done?

    My point being if the OP wants a 6" travel light freeride bike let him get one! The 08 RFX is a perfect example of a bike used for all mtn biking that most riders will never take to it's limits.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks
    a bit harsh but granted lots of people over state their riding - based on what trails you rode in the US , some threads you started and the type of riding you did, were you not way over biked yourself on the RFX when basically the flux would have got the job done?

    My point being if the OP wants a 6" travel light freeride bike let him get one! The 08 RFX is a perfect example of a bike used for all mtn biking that most riders will never take to it's limits.
    No. I actually had a Flux before the RFX and I was grossly under-biked. My description of "XC" might be skewed, however.

    I'm pretty sure this on a Flux would be considered abuse:


  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks
    a bit harsh but granted lots of people over state their riding - based on what trails you rode in the US , some threads you started and the type of riding you did, were you not way over biked yourself on the RFX when basically the flux would have got the job done?

    My point being if the OP wants a 6" travel light freeride bike let him get one! The 08 RFX is a perfect example of a bike used for all mtn biking that most riders will never take to it's limits.



    Hehe, better to have more bike than not enough, imho.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    What would someone want a lockout for unless they were XC and overstating the riding they do?
    Maybe the only FS he has experience with is from the olden days before Pro Pedal.

    I 'member Way back When in Ought Three, you really needed a lockout....

  24. #24
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    Slow down! No bike - no matter what frame and components - is going to do everything well. The OP stated mostly XC-riding with some FR and DH mixed in. . . 6" might be a bit much unless you're constantly landing 7' drops to flat. Take a look at some "fringe bikes" - SC Nomad or Heckler, Giant Reign, Orange 5. Base the build on what you're going to be riding most of the time. Lots of mud? Check the tire clearance. Don't enjoy turning wrenches? Think about a single-pivot instead of VPP. Finally, now that your bike is set up for the riding you do 90% of the time, you can always cross over to burlier rims and a coil-over shock if the going gets big when you decide it'll be a day of DH or FR.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by emptybe_er
    Slow down! No bike - no matter what frame and components - is going to do everything well. The OP stated mostly XC-riding with some FR and DH mixed in. . . 6" might be a bit much unless you're constantly landing 7' drops to flat. Take a look at some "fringe bikes" - SC Nomad or Heckler, Giant Reign, Orange 5. Base the build on what you're going to be riding most of the time. Lots of mud? Check the tire clearance. Don't enjoy turning wrenches? Think about a single-pivot instead of VPP. Finally, now that your bike is set up for the riding you do 90% of the time, you can always cross over to burlier rims and a coil-over shock if the going gets big when you decide it'll be a day of DH or FR.

    Oh cool.. a new term for All-mountain!!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by PsyCro
    Oh cool.. a new term for All-mountain!!
    BWAHAHA!!!

    . . .hey, you think I can get royalties if the advertisers start using this?

    By "fringe bikes" I guess I meant "Jack of all trades, master of none...". The acronym would then be "JOATMON" - and I get dibs on royalties if that gets used by advertisers also!

  27. #27
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    Check out the Felt Redemption 2. Felt stopped making them in 08, but you can still get one at any shop that sales Felt bikes. I bought mine about a month ago and love it. It's a 6 inch travel bike. It it feels like a downhill/freeride bike, but climbs like a XC bike. Weighs only 33lbs

  28. #28
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    Just cause a bike has 6" of travel doesn't mean it only needs to be used for drops. I regularly use all 7" of travel on my properly sprung 66RC2X. It's plush. Plus the faster you go the harder the hits are and more travel is used. If I need BO control I will dial in the X cartridge.

    As far as 7' drops to flat are concerned, well 3' drops to flat are harsh! Have any of you actually stood next to a 7' drop to flat? I do decent speed 5' drops to tranny on my 6.3" travel bike and I use all my travel. Why? Cause the suspension is setup properly for my typical terrain. 6" of travel is probably too much if you noodle around and never ride fast. But fairly smooth terrain at higher speed can cause a bike/fork to use all it's travel when setup properly!

    Some good choices are the:
    09' Turner RFX (in it's current form)
    Yeti 575, Single pivot simplicity
    09' Giant Reign
    Titus El Guapo
    Pivot Firebird
    Last edited by wormvine; 11-03-2008 at 07:05 PM.

  29. #29
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    A bit of cross country along with freeride/downhill is "all mountain" in my book. Not great on either end of the spectrum but it will survive both.. Although the OP did mention an Enduro and I'm not too sure that would be my rig of choice for someone mostly interested in xc.

  30. #30
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    Yeti 575 love it
    A person who exhibits both positive and negative qualities, strengths and weaknesses is not flawed, but complete.

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    I was in this position a year ago, and ended up with a Chumba Evo/Talas 36 combination. I bought it largely because I got a killer deal on a barely used frame, but after putting a whole lot of miles on it on all kinds of terrain I don't think I'd have been better off with anything else. It's a bit over 30 pounds, but I think anything under 30 is not really going to be very well suited to FR/DH stuff, unless you spend a whole lot (maybe ti El Guapo and an open budget for light-but-strong components).

    I really like the Evo, but there are a whole lot of superb bikes in that niche (El Guapo, Nomad, Ventana El Terremoto, etc etc) and you'd probably be happy with any of them.

    If you lean more to the XC side of AM, Yeti 575 would be a really good option, as would a whole lot of others in the 5-6" travel range... Turner Spot, Knolly Endorphin, Chumba XCL, many many more.

    None of these bikes are "the best", but they are all so good it's not gonna matter. At a certain point you just pick one and ride it.

  32. #32
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    The basic facts of economics rule out most of the recent suggestions on this thread. The OP is UK based and none of the suggestions are viable within a £1400 budget.

    To give you an idea, a Chumba Evo frame only is ~£1300. The Endorphin is over £1000 frame only.

    So while these bikes may be excellent for their riding characteristics, they aren't in the OP's budget.

    For UK riding (especially trail centre stuff like Cwmcarn) something like Marin Attack trail would be excellent. Last year's are getting sold off at ~£1800 now. You might find one secondhand within budget which will give you a Pike up front as well as a fantastic Quad Link rear end. As mentioned before, I've got a soft spot for the Commencal meta 5.5.

  33. #33
    TNC
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    AM...so many variables.

    I've had an '06 Nomad since January '06. It's been in several different configurations from 35lbs. to its current 32.5lbs. It's been ridden a whole bunch at an extremely rocky, technical dirt motorcycle riding ranch, Moab, and our local trail that is relatively rough. I also have 2 older model Bullits...'99 & '03...that are built up as burly trail bikes. I haven't had an XC type bike since my '01 SC Superlight...sold in '03. I sold that bike because it didn't inspire confidence in the rough or provide what I thought was a worthy speed advantage in the easier stuff.

    I was curious how a shorter travel bike might be to ride after many years of riding 6+ inch AM bikes. We had an '06 Trek carbon Fuel EX 9.5 hanging on the wall at the shop for a very long time, so I decided to try it out. This model is a 4" rear travel with an RS MC3 air shock of some sort that has a lockout, Floodgate, etc...1.5" stroke. I installed an RS Revelation dual air 130mm fork. I installed some decently light components on the frame, but it still ended up being 30lbs...somewhat of a surprise. I thought it should easily get to around 28lbs. with carbon bar, carbon stem, decently light wheels, crank, etc.

    I've been riding this bike like my Nomad and have been decently shocked how competent the bike is in relatively rough terrain...not Moab level by any means but plenty of rocks and such to make most riders on hardtails complain profusely...even some small man-made ramp jumps and such. I have no idea what the geometry numbers are on this frame...sorry...just put it together an rode it. And it might be noted that this 9.5 is not the pure XC model, as that is filled by the Top Fuel, a roughly 3" travel bike during the same mode year...so this is closer to a true trail bike, though not in the vein of the Nomad, Reign, etc. No, this frame doesn't have the axle pivot, ABP, or other doodads of the more recent Treks, so it is an example of a very basic 4" design.

    Why do I mention this comparison? The OP mentions 6" bikes, but what is an AM bike, and how do bikes at the two extreme ends of the possible AM spectrum really compare? This little experiment has shown me that even a basic design like this 4" travel Trek has come a long way since my '01 Superlight. It has shown me how well some of these long travel bikes like a Nomad climb compared to shorter travel bikes...this Trek being only slightly faster and easier to climb with. The Trek impressed me how stable it was in rocks, technical moves, and even some small air jumps. It has caused me to rethink how much travel is really necessary to have a very decent AM bike...and the better and more modern models of 5" or so bikes seem to blur the lines even more. Am I preparing to sell my Nomad and put on some lycra and race a rigid SS bike?...hardly. But I think one should really look at their terrain, skill level, and what they want their bike to truly accomplish when making a purchase decision on a long travel AM bike. Even a long travel trail bike junkie like me can find some new respect for a competent shorter travel trail bike. It also points how hard it is to classify "the best" of any bike in the AM category. Bikes overall have gotten pretty darned good, and when you put good components on them, it will likely be us as the rider that could be the weak link.

  34. #34
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    TNC great post! i'm on a 29er sultan with 4" of travel and it is a competent ride even when the terrain becomes more rocky and technical. it requires me though to focus and pick my lines carefully through the rocky ledgy stuff and really move and position my body rearward on tougher, sketchier downhill stuff. that said, i just briefly tried a nomad the other day for the first time and what struck me is how much less work it was to go down ledgy rocky stuff. i was really impressed. it think it's because the geometry of AM bikes with such a slack head angle simply sets up the bike and rider better for descents. you kinda feel your riding a motorcycle cruiser rather than fighting the downhill hunched over an XC bike. i wonder what a shorter travel bike with 67 degree HA would be like?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    ..... But I think one should really look at their terrain, skill level, and what they want their bike to truly accomplish when making a purchase decision on a long travel AM bike. Even a long travel trail bike junkie like me can find some new respect for a competent shorter travel trail bike. It also points how hard it is to classify "the best" of any bike in the AM category. Bikes overall have gotten pretty darned good, and when you put good components on them, it will likely be us as the rider that could be the weak link.
    TNC -Great post! I have a 2006 Moment which I am very happy with, but have been rethinking the amount of bike I really need to accomplish what I ride. I've ridden a few bikes in the same category (Nomad, Reign, RFX) and I am happy with the way the Moment compares, but what really got me to thinking on this subject was when my wife got her MotoLite. It is a 5" bike that rails the trails around here. The bike is super stable, handles well, very flex free and can take some abuse. Her bike weighs in a little over 26lbs and it really seems to leap forward when you get on the cranks. My bike is just shy of 34lbs and you really have to work at maintaining speed. It is somewhat of an apples to oranges comparison since she has superlight wheels/components that I would trash in a hearbeat (I am 210lbs), but it still got me thinking. A modern 5" trailbike weighing in 28-30 lbs can probably handle whatever I dish out.

  36. #36
    TNC
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    Quote Originally Posted by starre
    TNC great post! i'm on a 29er sultan with 4" of travel and it is a competent ride even when the terrain becomes more rocky and technical. it requires me though to focus and pick my lines carefully through the rocky ledgy stuff and really move and position my body rearward on tougher, sketchier downhill stuff. that said, i just briefly tried a nomad the other day for the first time and what struck me is how much less work it was to go down ledgy rocky stuff. i was really impressed. it think it's because the geometry of AM bikes with such a slack head angle simply sets up the bike and rider better for descents. you kinda feel your riding a motorcycle cruiser rather than fighting the downhill hunched over an XC bike. i wonder what a shorter travel bike with 67 degree HA would be like?
    Good analogy on the motorcycle comparison. I come from a background of dirt motors, and I've always felt my Nomad handled more like a dirt motor more than any MTB I've ridden over all the years...even my Bullits.

  37. #37
    Why not?
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    The Perp 3 from 07-08 has 7 inches of travel....if you want to drop about 2800 USD on it...tho its a wicked nice bike....

    Nothing But Glory, and Everything For It.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    No. I actually had a Flux before the RFX and I was grossly under-biked. My description of "XC" might be skewed, however.

    I'm pretty sure this on a Flux would be considered abuse:


    Man I ride stuff like that and a lot bigger with a hardtail on a regular basis.

    No such thing as underbiked once your in the area of quality bikes, just underskilled
    I Ride Bikes.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groffball
    Man I ride stuff like that and a lot bigger with a hardtail on a regular basis.

    No such thing as underbiked once your in the area of quality bikes, just underskilled
    Spinal injury does not equal "underskilled". My spine won't allow an HT for more than occasional use. That's great you do it on a hardtail. It means little, especially in a thread asking about a certain travel level of FS bikes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Spinal injury does not equal "underskilled". My spine won't allow an HT for more than occasional use. That's great you do it on a hardtail. It means little, especially in a thread asking about a certain travel level of FS bikes.
    Just stating that I don't see how anybody can say that a trail is too much for a certain bike when it all comes down to the rider and his/her skill level... I like the squish too, I take my dualie out a lot more often now
    I Ride Bikes.

  41. #41
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    Nah, that's where I think you're wrong. How can one expect something like an XC race bike with a low to mid 5 pound weight handle 4 footers and above for long?

  42. #42
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    While longer than 6" travel, I have heard that the Turner Highline actually climbs really well. You can also get them for cheap now so that is what I would recommend...not sure how good of an endurance racing type of bike it might be if that is your cup of tea but perhaps with something like American Classic wheels it would work for that as well.

    Specialized 6" travel bikes are also really good i hear...the more proprietary parts the better usually. Specialized has realized that the more mainstream parts, even high end ones, are simply not up to par with the rest of their lineup...if you can afford it, a Carbon Specialized would be great and all things considered, the $7000+ pricetag is a real bargain IMHO

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    Hey Jabba, for £1400 as mentioned along the way you can get a Commencal meta 55, and quite a nice spec, my daughter has one and I sneak out on it every now and then, and its great fun climbs and goes downhill fine and jumps great, I have to make sure I clean it well when I get back I bought her the 5.5.3 and then put some bigger tires on 2.35 Nevegals, the standard tires are awful the change transformed the bike, I have a spare set of Pikes that may suddenly go on or a second hand Heckler
    Last edited by jeffus; 11-05-2008 at 11:56 PM.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabba69
    I am looking to buy a new bike so what would you say is the best 6" travel bike, would like ajustable travel on the front i.e. 110-150 and would like it under 30 pounds in weight. Been looking at specialized enduro 08.Do a lot of cross country but like to do a bit of freeride and downhill aswell.Would like lock out on the back too.
    ibis mojo is the best bike per your question

    thanks

    mx

  45. #45
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    Surprised no one mentioned a Heckler :P, 6" single pivot perfect for those UK weathers. Can be built burly or light and i'm sure you can get a good deal from any UK online stores.

  46. #46
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    Kona Dawg Deluxe. I love mine. It makes me smile every time i ride it! Im 230lbs and i smash it around all the time. It has not failed me yet. Good components also.

  47. #47
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    Another vote here for the Yeti 575. I came off a Turner Nitrous (3 inch travel super-fast, super light race bike) and honestly, I'm almost as fast on the Yeti, I don't notice any real difference in pedaling efficiency, and the suspension lets me climb stuff that I would be walking before.

    I have the TALAS fork on it and when I drop the seat and flip that thing to full travel it feels just like a honest downhill bike. I guess I'd say that I ride aggressive xc - all mountain kinda stuff... fast, steep, technical stuff is common, as are drops in the 1-3 ft range -- though I've hit up to 5-6 ft to flat before (overshot a landing)... feels totally bottomless on those harsh landings.

    I've raced it in everything from xc and short track to 24 hours and downhill events. If you're looking for a sweet bike that can really do it all... definitely take a look.

  48. #48
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    Thanks for all your comments these are my weapons of choices specialized enduro 08,commencal meta 5.5, orange 5 or turner 5 spot which would you choose.

  49. #49
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    The best AM bike i've ever owned is my current Nicolai helius AM, build up @ 31lbs running Fox air front/back.

  50. #50
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    But none of those are around 1400 sterling! What about the Specialized Pitch..? The Meta 5.5 is also getting rave reviews, as is the Orange 5.
    Building: ​Boardman 2010 HT Pro
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    Previous Joy: '09 Commencal Meta 5 VIP

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonys102
    But none of those are around 1400 sterling! What about the Specialized Pitch..? The Meta 5.5 is also getting rave reviews, as is the Orange 5.
    The Specialized Pitch is a great bike for the money but it is only a 5" travel bike! But like a few people have mentioned on here, If the OP does XC and FR/DH not as often I think it would be a good investment. My friend has a Pitch Pro and it sounds like is a similar rider to the OP and loves his bike. He does Cwmcarn DH on it and has no prob with it because he isnt hitting the big jumps and step offs but still carries a fair bit of speed!
    If your not falling off, your not riding fast enough!

    Cube Fritzz 2008

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  52. #52
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    The Pitch's are 150mm/5.9in bike. Round it up and its a great 6 inch all mountain rig for the money.

  53. #53
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    The Pitch, for the most part, has a good entry price but really bad components.

  54. #54
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    Norco Six
    Giant Reign (x)
    Sx Trail
    Remedy 9
    Bottlerocket
    Preston FR
    Heckler
    Nomad
    Lean back, Hit both brakes, And ask yourself, Do you feel lucky today?

  55. #55
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    Gt Sanction!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    "This sticker is dangerous and inconvienent, but I do love Fig Newtons"

  56. #56
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    The Giant Reign and ReignX have got to be near the top of the list. Along with the Knolly Delerium-T RFX.

    --Ben
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  57. #57
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    in your price range:

    giant reign
    heckler
    chumba exc
    gt sanction
    spec pitch
    prophet

    all great bikes. Be honest about your riding style because if you are over-gunned you won't enjoy your rides as much.
    OVER THE LINE SMOKEY!

  58. #58
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    Have you seen the enduro SL Comps for 1299UKGBP or the Expert for 1499, for X0 rear mech, XO shifters XT cranks I think the way prices have gone this year its a bargain. So much so I've just ordered one. The other bikes to consider for cheap is the Prophet, Reign and Commencal 5.5.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by airs0ft3r
    The Pitch, for the most part, has a good entry price but really bad components.
    I would agree if you mean the Comp but, If you mean the Pro i would have to disagree. Granted the Pro isnt the best equipt bike out there but for £1400 its pretty good value for money! IMO
    If your not falling off, your not riding fast enough!

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  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks
    My point being if the OP wants a 6" travel light freeride bike let him get one! The 08 RFX is a perfect example of a bike used for all mtn biking that most riders will never take to it's limits.
    Tru dat. It can also be used in a pinch for XC trail riding (tho it won't be as quick as an XC bike). Truly an all round bike. If money were no object I'd recommend the RFX over most of the bikes suggested in this thread, and also suggest the Knolly Endorphin and the new DW Link Turner Spot.

    Quote Originally Posted by tonys102
    But none of those are around 1400 sterling! What about the Specialized Pitch..? The Meta 5.5 is also getting rave reviews, as is the Orange 5.
    The Pitch? Decent bike, really. Has some sketch components but they can always be replaced. A pal works for one of Speccys flagship stores and they tend to reccomend the Pitch over the Enduro. So she says anyway.


    ps i agree with fo
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  61. #61
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    ok I am dumb and I did not know what 1400 converted to in USD so I asked google and this is what I got 1,400.00 GBP = 2,171.66 USD


    Santa Cruz Heckler D AM = $2099 (us msrp)

    I like my Heckler, and I ride AM and XC and have a good time. Sometime I think the bike is a tad over built for my skill level but that gives me room to grow
    2007'ish Heckler and 2006 Chameleon
    If anyone needs the help of a prototype/custom machinist let me know.

  62. #62
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    Nomad

    If you can afford it, the Santa Cruz Nomad is hard to beat.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by venom600
    The Giant Reign and ReignX have got to be near the top of the list. Along with the Knolly Delerium-T RFX.

    --Ben
    You can't compare the knolly delirium t with those other bikes... waaaay better.

  64. #64
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    there's currently aren't any good 6" bikes on the market. Sorry.

    Additionally, 6" of travel is wasted on a bike that comes in under 30lbs, and a 50mm drop at the fork will make for a miserable pedalling experience thanks to a very steep seat angle.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  65. #65
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    Banshee Rune has a very decent price point and probably can be build ~30lbs without to much investment

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    there's currently aren't any good 6" bikes on the market. Sorry.

    Additionally, 6" of travel is wasted on a bike that comes in under 30lbs, and a 50mm drop at the fork will make for a miserable pedalling experience thanks to a very steep seat angle.

    Hah, yeah i agree. Its gotta be 6.3" or 6.7". Everything else just doesnt make sense!

  67. #67
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    Giant Reign FTW!!

    Simply an amazing bike. Also, Giant is able to give a great spec on their bikes - you'll be paying twice that for a Santa Cruz or Rocky equivalent...

  68. #68
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    I have read alot of threads similiar to this one

    A huge BIG UP to SC

    and that is why I bought my Heckler over some of the other bikes I was looking at.
    2007'ish Heckler and 2006 Chameleon
    If anyone needs the help of a prototype/custom machinist let me know.

  69. #69
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    I really like the new nomad a lot that would be my first choice! and diamondback has really stepped their game up in the past few years! the mission series is amazing! I think a lot of people look past diamondback cause they never really had a decent full suspension bike but there new Knuckle Box Rear Suspension design is a force to be reconed with! I also like the trek remedy and gary fisher roscoe and giant reign! and one other really cool new bike is the niner wfo 29 inch wheels and 5.5 inch travel! and i would say iron horse 6 point series cause the dw link is awesome but what were they thinking with the 37ish pound weight?

  70. #70
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    Moment

    If you are looking for an awesome 6" travel bike that can do everything and handle abuse, definitely look at the Ellsworth Moment. I have my Moment built up just under 30 lbs with a Fox 36 TALAS RLC fork with 160mm travel. The Moment pedals amazingly well for a 6" travel bike. Another bike you may consider is the Titus El Guapo, which also rides very nicely.
    Kokopelli Racing

    "Curb drops to flat, or curb drops to transition? There's a BIG difference there." Qfactor03

  71. #71
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    Nomad.
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  72. #72
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    SxT
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabba69
    Thanks for all your comments these are my weapons of choices specialized enduro 08,commencal meta 5.5, orange 5 or turner 5 spot which would you choose.
    Turner 5 Spot or the Commencal. Both great bikes. If you want a Specialized bike the Pitch is a much better choice.
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  74. #74
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    Thread Hi-jack! (But it is on topic!)

    I'm looking to change my frame, I am looking for a 6" rear travel all mountain bike.

    I currently have a Santa Cruz Heckler, with a Fox36 RC2, which is a great bike but I am looking to move on from single pivot.

    I weight 205lbs and ride aggresive XC to light FR, 6' drops to flat, to hitting rock gardens at pace. But due to having no lift system access it needs to be able to climb well, from steep technical to 3 mile trail climbs

    I'm looking for a frame around 7Lbs Max

    So all suggestions welcomeand any comments on the bikes mention below are welcome!

    I am currently considering..,

    Turner RFX
    Intense 6.6
    Yeti ASR 7
    Ellesworth Moment
    Santa Cruz Nomad

    (But if the truth be known I find the ASR & Moment quiet ugly!)

    Thanks

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash Bang
    Thread Hi-jack! (But it is on topic!)

    I'm looking to change my frame, I am looking for a 6" rear travel all mountain bike.

    I currently have a Santa Cruz Heckler, with a Fox36 RC2, which is a great bike but I am looking to move on from single pivot.

    I weight 205lbs and ride aggresive XC to light FR, 6' drops to flat, to hitting rock gardens at pace. But due to having no lift system access it needs to be able to climb well, from steep technical to 3 mile trail climbs

    I'm looking for a frame around 7Lbs Max

    So all suggestions welcomeand any comments on the bikes mention below are welcome!

    I am currently considering..,

    Turner RFX
    Intense 6.6
    Yeti ASR 7
    Ellesworth Moment
    Santa Cruz Nomad

    (But if the truth be known I find the ASR & Moment quiet ugly!)

    Thanks
    Don't be a fool or Mr T will come and kick your a$$.

    http://www.go-ride.com/ProductDetail...000-1168878294

    Check on the Turner forum if you need another size.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  76. #76
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    Thanks for the link

    However I would be looking at the new RFX with the DW-Link

    Has anyone ridden one?

    Is it better of worse than the old 08 bike?

    (Perhaps I should post this on the Turner forum!)

  77. #77
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    I say the KONA COILER or air. It can do it all XC, FR, DH and DJ. But it a bit heavy as oem... you can fix that with upgrades though.
    If it ain't broken... why the hell you fixin it!

    KONA rules!!

    If you miss the tranny... don't look down.

  78. #78
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    Has anyone ridden one?

    The DW link RFX does not exist yet. So, no.

  79. #79
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    Whatever comes out the year after you buy yours.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    If you're riding XC, why do you need 6" and why are people recommending bikes on the edge of FR?
    You do not need anything. Just nowadays 6" bikes are quite light and climb well, especially with an adjustable travel fork. So if you go buy/build one trail bike - why limit yourself to less?

    I think 5.5" to 6.5" travel is the sweet spot for the 26" bikes.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    You do not need anything. Just nowadays 6" bikes are quite light and climb well, especially with an adjustable travel fork.
    I've been riding such bikes since 1998, and I do not agree with that statement. You can get a light 6" bike. You can get one that climbs well on roads (no bob) or one that climbs well in the rough technical stuff (active suspension). You can get one that eats up the square-edged bumps really well. You can get one that "pedals" well in a certain gear combo, and so on. The closest thing to the "holy grail" in my riding experience is the DW-link/Giant Maestro stuff.

    Now, that said, there are a lot of bikes out there with 6" of travel that simply suck for riding all day/as a primary bike. You get a "light" 6" bike that has to run propedal to not suck at "pedaling", and even without propedal it's speced with heavy-compression damping so it doesn't work nearly as well as it ought to with that much travel. Or of course you have the heavy coil-shock bike that weighs around 34-35lbs or more. Not that this is extremely "heavy", but lots of people buy into the hype that they can pedal around such a bike, and then every ride their buddies kill them on their 5" or less travel bikes. A question must be posed: "What is the point?" What is the "better" bike? A 6" travel "trail bike" with super-relaxed geometry? To make this fit your criteria of light weight and "pedaling" it will need air shocks on both ends, relatively light parts, and so on. For about the same weight you could have a coil sprung 5" travel bike, with less travel it's not going to bob as much and doesn't need to run so heavy on the compression, so the travel is going to work better.

    I have one of those "legendary" hardcore-trail bikes. To be honest, it climbs like crap. People have told me otherwise, but I'm out there riding it on multiple-thousand vert rides quite frequently. The only reason it climbs is because I can climb well. Lots of people think they can buy a 6" travel bike and that somehow the technology and the sport have evolved to the point where it's as easy to ride that kind of a bike up hills and on level ground as it was to ride a 3" XC rig back in 1998. The bottom line is that it's not, the weight is not down all that much if it is to be built to actually fulfill it's potential, and concerning those rigs that ARE quite a bit lighter, the suspension relatively sucks for the most part, at least to what is possible with a good coil shock and less travel.

    As I said, the DW link/Maestro seem to allow you to have you cake and eat it to the highest extent that I've seen. The minimal compression damping that is required by the suspension forces coupled with the wheelpath allows them to eat bumps, pedal, and accelerate very well, although they still aren't going to be super-light and you have the geometry to contend with as well. My final point is that one must think real hard about something like an RFX or similer type of bike. It's not going to "keep up" with XC guys given the same fitness level, lots of people want the travel but not the weight, which reduces the suspension effectiveness and gets you back to square one. Think about what you really want or need.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I've been riding such bikes since 1998, and I do not agree with that statement. You can get a light 6" bike. You can get one that climbs well on roads (no bob) or one that climbs well in the rough technical stuff (active suspension). You can get one that eats up the square-edged bumps really well. You can get one that "pedals" well in a certain gear combo, and so on. The closest thing to the "holy grail" in my riding experience is the DW-link/Giant Maestro stuff.
    You are way too picky. You can get 6" around 30lb, with forks that drops from 160 to 120, and it climbs just fine, on road and off-road.

    My 6" Coiler is 10lb heavier then my 4" Yeti, I would not take it to a marathon race, but for your your average trail ride it works just fine in the hills of California. It does not bob much, and frankly I do not keep many mental notes about the difference in squareness of the edges and gear combos.

    The point is, 5 to 6" became the sweet spot for an all around mountain bike. Proof is in what people build, buy and ride.

    I have no opnion about your preference for DW link. I ride single pivots and do not obsess with fairly minimal optimizations. My favorite all-around bike is Yeti 575, (though I now own a Yeti Kokopelli and a Kona Coiler - kind of covering the spectrum).. I think 575 rides better then Ibis Mojo (with your favorite links).

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    there's currently aren't any good 6" bikes on the market. Sorry.

    Additionally, 6" of travel is wasted on a bike that comes in under 30lbs, and a 50mm drop at the fork will make for a miserable pedalling experience thanks to a very steep seat angle.

    Pure baloney.

    Sorry, Scott, you are way off.

    No, there is no miserable pedalling experience, and travel is not wasted. I have no idea where did you come up with that. Sun must not shine there.

  84. #84
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    i dont know bout you but i think its worth the "weight" to have a more slacked out aggressive trail bike, i like how it handles better than the smaller bike and its worth it to me when i feel i can rip the same trail way harder. that being said there is one trailbike that feels the best yet for me. anyone around here pedal around a RockyMountain ETSX70/90? i thought it felt the most familary to my fr/dh style of riding in a superlight fast killer package. except it had like 26/27in bars, which if it was mine would be gone like that(sunline V-1 or dirtythirtys) and a slightly shorter stem
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  85. #85
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    here one is
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  86. #86
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    I didn't read this but....My answer is.......

    My 6.6 with a 2 Step Lyric.
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    You are way too picky. You can get 6" around 30lb, with forks that drops from 160 to 120, and it climbs just fine, on road and off-road.

    My 6" Coiler is 10lb heavier then my 4" Yeti, I would not take it to a marathon race, but for your your average trail ride it works just fine in the hills of California. It does not bob much, and frankly I do not keep many mental notes about the difference in squareness of the edges and gear combos.

    The point is, 5 to 6" became the sweet spot for an all around mountain bike. Proof is in what people build, buy and ride.

    I have no opnion about your preference for DW link. I ride single pivots and do not obsess with fairly minimal optimizations. My favorite all-around bike is Yeti 575, (though I now own a Yeti Kokopelli and a Kona Coiler - kind of covering the spectrum).. I think 575 rides better then Ibis Mojo (with your favorite links).
    If your coiler is so easy to ride all day and such a great climber, why do you have the yeti?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    If your coiler is so easy to ride all day and such a great climber, why do you have the yeti?
    Because I have had the yeti for several years and got the coiler just recently. I have lightened it up and it will be an adventure race/marathon ride. I also just got a 20lb titanium hardtail to round it up, set up with pavement/fireroad tires.

    So the answer to your question is: because I can afford five bikes, not one. (..also have a single speed full suspension, and a fixie road) If I was forced to have one, Kona would be it. As I have said - that is the sweet spot nowadays.

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldsteele
    ..My answer is.......

    My 6.6 with a 2 Step Lyric.
    The 6.6 is hard to beat in this category. The frame is 7.25 lbs and they can be built up around 30 lbs pretty easily. It sprints more spritely than most bikes with 6.5" of travel, is a very efficient climber, and is extremely competent on rough, steep, technical downs. I have one for sale if you're interested.

    Someone else mentioned the GT Sanction. One of the surprises for me at I-bike. Check out my reviews if you care what I thought about the other bikes in this category.

    I noticed a GT Sanction 1.0 frame with CCDB coil shock, Fox 36 fork, Thomson stem, Chris King headset, etc in the classifieds yesterday for $1500 USD. I know shipping to the UK may be kinda expensive but you oughta take a look at it.

    If you need a medium there's a great '07 RFX complete for $2500 for sale by drtdiva too.

    Here's a new Meta 5.5 frame for $950 too.


    Having said all that.... if you really do mostly XC I would echo what others have said. You may be happier on a lighter 4-5" trail bike like the Titus Motolite or Meta 5.5. Rippin' the smooth xc trails an a bike more suited to that type of riding is way more fun than slogging a bigger/heavier/slacker 6" bike on them. You can do it, yes. There's several 6" bikes that are passable as xc/trail bikes.... but it's not where they are happiest.

    The closest I've found to a bike that does both reasonably well is the new Tracer VP.... but the frame alone will cost you $2500.

    Happy hunting. Ain't it fun?
    Last edited by KRob; 11-18-2008 at 03:45 PM.
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  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by coldsteele
    My 6.6 with a 2 Step Lyric.
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob
    The 6.6 is hard to beat in this category.
    WORD

    the drugs made me realize it's not about the drugs

  91. #91
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    I actually bought that Sanction that Krob mentioned. I thought it was a really good deal and too hard to pass up. I was looking for a bigger bike and this guy really suited the build. I couldnt really argue with a CCDB, Talas 36 and a great frame, to go along with a bunch of other quality parts. The pictures of the frame were fantastic and Bill (the owner) is a great guy, been a real pleasure to talk with.

  92. #92
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    I found mine hangging out by a local trail. I couldn't get too close or it would run away.
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    Team MOJO Wheels.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Because I have had the yeti for several years and got the coiler just recently. I have lightened it up and it will be an adventure race/marathon ride. I also just got a 20lb titanium hardtail to round it up, set up with pavement/fireroad tires.

    So the answer to your question is: because I can afford five bikes, not one. (..also have a single speed full suspension, and a fixie road) If I was forced to have one, Kona would be it. As I have said - that is the sweet spot nowadays.
    But that proves my point just fine, these aren't all-day marathon/adventure ride bikes, it's the RIDER that can make up for this fact. Do these 6" bikes pedal better than 6" bikes from 5 years ago? For the most part yes. Do these 6" bikes weigh lighter than 6" bikes from a few years ago? A few pounds maybe. Do they have better suspension than bikes from 5 years ago? Only in a few cases, some of the execution is better, but otherwise not really, especially with a lot of the prevalance of the RP23/propedal/heavy compression damping-type shocks that have been out there for a while now. You can get one of these bikes, build it up so it can deal with "any terrain", but it comes down to the rider. IMO people have unrealistic expectations in terms of how "easy" it is to pedal these bikes, OR they are built up with air shocks on the light-side and the suspension is so-so. There are a few bikes that break the mold in this respect, but not many. I have more than one bike too, and if the 6" bikes were so great at pedaling and such, I wouldn't have had any want for anything else, but the reality is that it's not a 4" XC bike, it will never be as light as one, it will never be as easy to pedal as one, but trust me there are plenty of people that think these types of bikes are some sort of end-all.

    I'm not saying your flat out wrong or anything, just that people need to consider these bikes very carefully, especially in the sense of "are you getting something usefull?" compared to a nice 5" bike like a chumba XCL or titus motolite, etc. More travel is not always better.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  94. #94
    TLL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    You are way too picky. You can get 6" around 30lb, with forks that drops from 160 to 120, and it climbs just fine, on road and off-road.
    But the point is, it does not climb as well as a bike with less travel. I have a 6" travel bike with coil, and while it does a decent job climbing uphill it is just not as quick as a 4"-5" travel bike. Granted, I make it work, and I really don't mind the extra weight. and having a CCDB really makes the bike almost bob-free, but even still I cannot keep up with guys riding lighter bikes. Luckily, most of my climbs are only an hour in length, but if I had to do 3-4 hour climbs I'd be suffering much less on a bike with less travel.


    Of course, the trade-off is that I pass a lot of people when headed downhill.

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    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  95. #95
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    I do not consider it at all unreal if I want a 6" bike that doesn't bob. I'm glad GT is picking up some steam, but the thing with I-Drive is that it just plain works. I look at my rear shock while mashing the pedal (on open road, no cars, with a spotter no less). There is no bob. The O-ring doesn't move a milimeter. I'm a 150 pound rider and I have it set up at 130 PSI and still, no BOB. Fox Float R with prebuilt propedal...

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Pure baloney.

    Sorry, Scott, you are way off.

    No, there is no miserable pedalling experience, and travel is not wasted. I have no idea where did you come up with that. Sun must not shine there.
    Does the sun shine in california? you should know.

    Experience brought me to those conclusions. It's no secret that if you decide to change your seat angle by 4* on one bike for every other climb you're gonna be using a whole different set of muscles to pedal; it feels like pushing through mud. I guess eventually you'll adapt if you do it all the time, but there's no way around using a terrible seat angle half the time.

    It takes more material to make a bike stiffer, there's no way around it. Having a mountain of travel on a bike that deflects all over the place when you pin it through the rough or land a jump just sucks; either you're never gonna use all that travel or you've got a suspension design that chews through it really easily, either way i'd rather not have to it pedal around. The extra suspension squat (at least in the fork) is annoying too. Not to mention that less travel with coils will ride better anyway.

    But... I'm a huge dude; i'm apt to be really bothered by a little flex and i use a fairly steep seat angle to begin with to keep my ass in front of the rear wheel.

    Your face is pure baloney! zing.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I'm not saying your flat out wrong or anything, just that people need to consider these bikes very carefully, especially in the sense of "are you getting something usefull?" compared to a nice 5" bike like a chumba XCL or titus motolite, etc. More travel is not always better.
    In my previous post I have referred to the "5 to 6' range" (quote) being the current sweet spot. I am not sure why you are arguing with that post only to come back with a 5" recommendation.

    Yes, more travel is not always better. After 6"/6.5", bottom bracket gets jacket up, and overall balance is off for climbing, even with an adjustable travel fork. I think 180mm front travel is the natural usable limit for all around riding due to the geometry of the human body. If somebody asks me for a perfect travel to choose right now - I usually suggest a 140mm front fork, and balanced rear - lots of very good choices. If that guy already owns an older XC bike, (like myself) I would choose to complement it with a 160mm fork based AM machine.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLL
    But the point is, it does not climb as well as a bike with less travel. I have a 6" travel bike with coil, and while it does a decent job climbing uphill it is just not as quick as a 4"-5" travel bike. Granted, I make it work, and I really don't mind the extra weight. and having a CCDB really makes the bike almost bob-free, but even still I cannot keep up with guys riding lighter bikes. Luckily, most of my climbs are only an hour in length, but if I had to do 3-4 hour climbs I'd be suffering much less on a bike with less travel.

    Of course, the trade-off is that I pass a lot of people when headed downhill.
    If it weights the same - what may be a possible reason for it to be any slower? Not as efficient pedalling position? You TALAS drops to adjust. Energy loss for bob? Really? With a pro-pedal shock, what do you think is the actual energy dissipation there?

    Climbing speed is a) your effective power out put, that may be affected by your body position and gearing divided by b) overall weight of you and your bike. Next factor is the rolling resistance (tires), air resistance (small), losses in the suspension (small). Then, it is the available traction, and picking up lines to adjust for that...

    I climb slower on my 36lb Kona, then on my 25lb Yeti, then on my 20lb Motobecane Fly Ti, due to the bike weight and choice of tires and gears.

    What do you think may be another factor that is not entirely in the head of a rider? If you build a 6" to the same weight as a 4" - what exactly is physically different for it to be any slower?

  99. #99
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    I am liking my Titus El Guapo. Climbs great, has 160mm of travel, and can be bulit well under 30lbs (mine is at 31). Read the tech stuff on the Titus web site, it sold me on the Horst/FSR design. Then look for the most well put together Horst/FSR bike available and you will be back at the Titus web site. All the El Guapo reviews on MTBR are true IMO, great climber, great descender, great looking. Rear travel is not adjustable, but it is not a problem when the suspension works so well. I don't even need to use the lockout while standing on a climb. El Guapo means "The Best" in spanish... not really.

  100. #100
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    Hands down the new Intense Tracer VP is the best 6" bike built.

    It takes the word "versatility" to a new level in mtn biking.

    --build it with a 6"rear and a 160mm 36 talas at 30lbs.

    --or 5.5"rear with a 140mm talas at 25lbs.

    16.75" chainstays and a great geometry - super stiff rear with big bearings all around.

    This bike is replacing both the 5.5 and 6.6 for good reason...............its much more solid/ stiff and with a better leverage ratio with alot better geometry for both 5.5 and 6" setups.

    The only bike that can compare would be the Knolly Endorphin--although it will likely be less versitile in terms of geometry and add a few pounds to the weight vs. the Intense Tracer vp. Pricier to boot.

    You asked for the best---and if climbing is as important as descending---these two are the "price is no object" hands down best in show right now.

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