Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Weight?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    421

    Weight?

    I just weight my bike. It use to be 33lbs. Now its 36lbs. Three things I have done are 1. Change the fork from z1light to 55RC3 ETA. 2 Changed tubes from specialized to Kenda Heavy Duty XC and 3. I went from Kenda 2.35 Nevegal sticky to Maxxis ADvantage 2.4.
    Im no wt weenie but this is a little much. The fork I can see gaining a pound but how much do tube and Tires add. By the way I like the grip and lack of rolling resistance of the Advantage over Nevegals but not the weight.
    How can I reduce weight down to 34 or 34.5lbs.
    Thanks,
    Mctigre

  2. #2
    Seeeriously easy Livin
    Reputation: Flystagg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,865
    I'm surprised you didn't gain more than that. Forget heavy duty tubes, they are a half assed replacement, go tubless and get that weight back.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    27
    the biggest part of your problem is that you added weight to the wheels which is rotational weight. so don't be surprised if your bike feels slower too. either go tubeless, or ditch the heavy duty tubes for normal or light weight ones. then look at cheap parts on your rig where you could lose 1/4 to 1/2lb by replacing them. I've got my Remedy 7 at 29.5lbs so I know you're struggles and have conquered them.
    Simply put:

    "I know there are many ways to find happiness… I found mine on my bike" -Mark Weir

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,905
    the 55 is a boatanchor of a fork.

    besides that.. did you like the way your bike rode before you weighed it? its just numbers on a scale, if it works for you, forget it.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    421
    Tomsmoto,
    Your comment makes me laugh. My bike already has light parts on it. I have a Ti spring on my DHX, XO stuff, Carbon Handelbar. I will replace these tubes. Hopefully I can save more than a Pound If I switch out tubes and tire. I just really like these Advantages. Any suggestions on large Volume tires that have good gripe on Rocks, roots, and loose over hardpack? I live in Austin, Tx. Thats mostly what we have here.
    The wheels are the Cheapest and most noticible way for me to save wt.
    Thanks for your replies,
    Mctigre
    PS. I am going to try my 1st race in 2 weeks. Mostly XC from what I can tell

  6. #6
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,495
    Quote Originally Posted by MCtigre
    Tomsmoto,
    Your comment makes me laugh. My bike already has light parts on it. I have a Ti spring on my DHX, XO stuff, Carbon Handelbar. I will replace these tubes. Hopefully I can save more than a Pound If I switch out tubes and tire. I just really like these Advantages. Any suggestions on large Volume tires that have good gripe on Rocks, roots, and loose over hardpack? I live in Austin, Tx. Thats mostly what we have here.
    The wheels are the Cheapest and most noticible way for me to save wt.
    Thanks for your replies,
    Mctigre
    PS. I am going to try my 1st race in 2 weeks. Mostly XC from what I can tell
    I've ran a ~35-36lb bike for a long time with an 06 66 RC2 + ETA (so real similer fork to your 55). It's a great bike, I'm not light or easy on bikes, so it holds up. You have to realize what you need, but you can definitely cut weight in areas. There's no reason for thick tubes if you have thick tires. A regular tube will fill up a 2.5, and even a 2.7 tire pretty well. Thorns are another matter, and if that's the problem, then go tubeless with sealent or a much lighter tire with some tubes that have sealent. I use thick sidewalls when I need to, but that's for protection from slashing the sidewall (rocks). Almost no one should run the same size rear and front tire. Always step down the rear tire size. The increased weight on the rear means more traction, which means to have an even amount traction with the front and rear you should step down the rear size slightly. If you run a 2.5 up front, run a 2.3 in the rear. Most people also tend to over-build the front wheel. There is again a lot more weight on the rear end of the bike as compared to the front (fork springs are generally ~30lbs and a 1:1 ratio, so it means most of your weight is on the rear end of the bike when slamming through stuff). This means you don't need the same rim or spokes on the front end as compared to the rear end. I know this sounds strange, but otherwise you're carrying around dead-weight on your front wheel that isn't really providing any needed strength. Sometimes you can't avoid this problem because the wheelsets are pre-built (which is why I build my own).

    Don't try to make the bike into something that isn't going to be fun to ride (light components that detract from it's ability). Get a cheap hardail (29er?) if you want to race and do other XC stuff. That's what I did and it helps a lot, rather than dumping a whole lot of money into my other bike that will decrease the fun-factor in the rough.

    Obviously an air-shock may help, but some of them suck (like the DHX 5.0 air) while some can be pretty nice if you get them tuned correctly (like a RP23 by push). Even still, an air shock may not perform as well as a coil, but it is the ticket for some people.

    With very carefull selection of frame and components, I'd bet you can build a very capable bike around 32lbs with 6.5" of travel on both ends, coil shock, and good sized tires. You always run into problems though, because if the XCish pedals don't hold up, you go back to shimano 545s and 647s. If the tires don't hold up you go back to at least 800g tires (maybe more). If you're stuck on one fork (the 55 RC3 has fantastic damping) you may end up a lot heavier. And of course the wheels need to hold up. Sometimes you can't really make a lot of sacrifices in these areas, so you really don't save much weight.

    Once you really start counting grams, it's easy to rationalize parts that may not be up to the task.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •