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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! Upgrade or 2011 Giant Reign or 2011 Yeti 575?

    Hi there here is the background:

    I have been a Giant´s maestro fan since the beginning, I currently posses a very well taken care of 2008 Giant Reign 0. I have been toying with the idea, of upgrading my frame, since I love the color and the frame itself.

    What riding am I looking for:
    well AM and Aggressive AM. I need to pedal high and long to enjoy the down hill riding (not referring to the DH category). Therefore I do need a realiable suspension system, "Maestro" is in the top 5 list, I also need an adjustable fork, with through axle and light but strong rims, and a seat dropper.

    I started seriously considering the upgrade for my 2008 Reign, getting a seat dropper (anyone knows which one would fit the frame?), new lighter than stock rims, and a new perhaps TALAS 140 or 150mm with 15mm thru axle.

    While window shopping around the internet I quickly realized this would cost more than 1000usd, way more. So what is the point of upgrading when I could go for a new bike with perhaps all these components as stock.

    I like Giant Reigns, and for that matter their freeride and dh bikes, I just find them elegant. Nonetheless since the beginning I have had a crush on Yeti bikes. Particularly the 575.

    Now I am searching for opinions and options. I would like the tech advantages from the newer Reigns, particularly in rear triangle rigidity and stiffness, though they are quite expensive, since I would need to go for the Reign 0 at least to get the components I want. But I would like to hear about the Yeti 575, it seems a very capable machine, though it is a single pivot and I am not so keen on this suspension system.

    Any opinions regarding any of these 2.

    A SC Nomad would also be a nice option but definitely too expensive.

    I am open for opinions about other AM bikes.

    As said I am particularly interested in the pedaling efficiency and then again being able to take the beating.

    thanks in advance for any opinion.

  2. #2
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    I am looking for a new FS bike so being in this position I have gone to 3 different demo rides. The first two being Giant and Yeti. I rode the Reign 0 (I actually was interested in the reign 1 or 2 but they didn't have those to demo) anyways I was pretty impressed with the bike (by the way 1st time riding a FS bike I own a HT) it handled good, cornered great and over all felt pretty good. There were only 2 issues I had with the bike. 1st the annoying chain slap when going over the rough stuff for a bike this exspensive to me that shouldn't be there, 2 the back suspension seemed too soft, bottomed the bike out several times. Giant did a good job setting the bike up for my weight, they answered all of my questions and were cool. if it wasn't for the chain slapping and back end issues I would probably be heading down to a giant dealer. 575, I got to test this one in my own backyard, Sycamore canyon Riverside. Jenson held the demo and I have to say from the beginning before I even threw a leg over the bike I was not impressed. I have read pretty good things about the 575 so my expectations were high to say the least but once I got it out on the familure trails I was a little dissapointed. the bike was a little twitchy to me, never felt comfortable on it and wasn't impressed. It didn't feel as solid as the reign, just really not impressed with it. For me for the money it cost to buy the 575 I would totally look at the Reing first but the bike you did not mention and is the one I am going with is the pitch pro. IMO it just feels right, handles great and all of the annoying stuff on the other bikes the pitch does not have. good luck with your decision.

  3. #3
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    If you are happy with the bike you already have I
    would go ahead and upgrade it. This way it will be
    just what you want. Also remember you can sell
    the old parts to help with the cost of the new ones.
    I also own a 575 and feel it is a great bike that can
    be set up in a number of ways. I have never noticed
    that it is anything but a solid performer.

    Best, John

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by afp3
    I a There were only 2 issues I had with the bike. 1st the annoying chain slap when going over the rough stuff for a bike this exspensive to me that shouldn't be there, 2 the back suspension seemed too soft, bottomed the bike out several times.
    Hmm you have to consider that the Reign has become the light AM bike in Giant´s line up, and yes you are right chainslap is horrible! But, you shouldnt be put out by this, I assure you 95% of the time you will never use the bigger front ring, so just take it of an install a dual ring chainguide like the Gamut (which offers a BB mount since Giant dont offer ISCG mounts) and believe the bike will transform!

    About bottoming out, I guess being a demo it might have had an issue with the shick or the pressure was not right, I have never bottomed out mine, except in a 70cm drop, which lets be fair, is reasonable for such a bike.

    I do feel worried about your impressions about the Yeti though... anyone else has more opinions on it?

    The Speci Pitch is a great bike, I just dont like much the previous FSR, I would suggest you to go for a 2011 (dont go for a 2010) Speci Enduro, it is a great bike!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Kuhl
    I have never noticed
    that it is anything but a solid performer.
    Best, John
    THanks fort the input John, could you elaborate about more about your impressions on the 575?

    I understand your point of upgrading, but it is simply to expensive, although you are right I can simply upgrade keep the older stuff and resell it as a complete keeping my newer parts. Though still around 1700 usd might be to steep for 3 or 4 things to swap

  6. #6
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    So, you are looking at approximately 1700.00 to upgrade, or about... 4800.00 for a new Reign? I have no idea of your financial situation, but if I had a bike that was performing well that I could significantly improve it for about 1/3 the cost of a new one, I know which path I would take.

    It would be different if you had an old bike with outdated suspension technology. Or if you are a heavy guy who has been beating the hell out of your current ride. Then I'd say save up for a new ride.

    Another consideration: You can upgrade one part at a time. A new bike will (probably) require all the money up front.

    Sorry, no recommendations on a new bike. I'm still riding an AC.

    Good luck, whatever your decision.

  7. #7
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    In that you are right...
    is just that I like my bikes from the same brand, and lately I have been lurking a yeti 303 rdh, though the day i actually get might have to wait bit more since I just recently quit my job...

    I guess I should probably demo one of the yeti 575 once before buying a new one, and yes, I have been thinking about it, the new reigns are sweet expensive, and my frame is almost new apart from a couple of small transport scratches...


    well we´ll see what happens in the coming months.

  8. #8
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    First of all the seatpost diameter on the Reign is 30.9mm I'd recommend KS 950r, or RS Reverb.

    You can do many things with your current bike upgrade change the rear to 10mm TA, what kind of fork do you have currently on your Reign. However, if you ride more aggressive I would not go with 15qr, why not 20 TA. If you are consider frame upgrade may be Reign X?

    I've not experienced the chain slap on the reign that I ride but they are all has chainguide and Sram rear derailleurs

    Yeti 575 would feel more XC than Reign, I think it's the taller size and geometry it's almost a size bigger than other competitors. It feels more XC than my 5.5" Ibis Mojo for sure. If you are considering Yeti may me ASR 7

    @afp3 I can't tell you about the chain slap as I've not experienced one on the Reign but suspension "too soft" is a set up not a design flaw. The rep might have get you started in the right direction but at the end of the day the bike still need to be dialed in for your riding style, sounded like you didn't have enough psi and/or the right compression for your style of riding.

  9. #9
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    I would just upgrade your bike you have currently. It sounds like your 100% sure that you like your frame you currently have along with the suspension. Why would you sacrifice that if you have a perfectly good thing going? The Yeti probably won't be what you want it to be, Mimi is right the 575 is definitely more XC than your Reign.

    The grass is always green on the other side.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cesalec
    Hi there here is the background:

    I have been a Giant´s maestro fan since the beginning, I currently posses a very well taken care of 2008 Giant Reign 0. I have been toying with the idea, of upgrading my frame, since I love the color and the frame itself.

    What riding am I looking for:
    well AM and Aggressive AM. I need to pedal high and long to enjoy the down hill riding (not referring to the DH category). Therefore I do need a realiable suspension system, "Maestro" is in the top 5 list, I also need an adjustable fork, with through axle and light but strong rims, and a seat dropper.

    I started seriously considering the upgrade for my 2008 Reign, getting a seat dropper (anyone knows which one would fit the frame?), new lighter than stock rims, and a new perhaps TALAS 140 or 150mm with 15mm thru axle.

    While window shopping around the internet I quickly realized this would cost more than 1000usd, way more. So what is the point of upgrading when I could go for a new bike with perhaps all these components as stock.

    I like Giant Reigns, and for that matter their freeride and dh bikes, I just find them elegant. Nonetheless since the beginning I have had a crush on Yeti bikes. Particularly the 575.

    Now I am searching for opinions and options. I would like the tech advantages from the newer Reigns, particularly in rear triangle rigidity and stiffness, though they are quite expensive, since I would need to go for the Reign 0 at least to get the components I want. But I would like to hear about the Yeti 575, it seems a very capable machine, though it is a single pivot and I am not so keen on this suspension system.

    Any opinions regarding any of these 2.

    A SC Nomad would also be a nice option but definitely too expensive.

    I am open for opinions about other AM bikes.

    As said I am particularly interested in the pedaling efficiency and then again being able to take the beating.

    thanks in advance for any opinion.
    I have a pretty sweet Nomad built up, and as nice as they are, I wouldn't go and drop $5k on a Nomad when you already have a capable frame.

    here is what I would do: look for used parts on Pinkbike and here. It may take a while, but it'll pay off

    - 150mm Float/Van w/ 15mm qr fork : $400
    - new wheelset (or at least new front) : $500
    - KS i950r post : $250
    - chain guide/bash : $100
    - rear shock tuning to PUSH: $200

    That only puts you up to $1450. Assuming you can sell your old parts for $500, you are only at $1k, with a lot of stuff you probably don't really need, and parts nicer than a brand new bike. Also, I'd forget about travel adjust forks. I had a TALAS and never used it. I can climb on my Nomad just fine with a 180mm Marz RC3 Ti.

    Best of luck!

  11. #11
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    Cesalec, Mimi said it pretty good on the 575. I have mine
    set up as a long travel XC bike. Its pretty light and fast for
    a bike with this much travel. I don't do any big drops or hits
    so It just works good for me. The only thing I don't like is
    the back wheel doesn't do real good on square edges. I
    have never noticed the bike being twitchy.

    Best, John

  12. #12
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    After riding a Maestro (or VPP,DW) bike for years I think you would be disappointed with the performance of the single pivot 575. Single pivots are fine (I love my '03 Heckler) but Maestro is better. Stiffer while climbing and more plush when descending.

    At least this is what I have found based on riding and owning many different suspension designs.
    “We couldn’t break it in test lab. Casing a jump? Forget it, the jump will break first!”

  13. #13
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    I rented a Yeti 575 in Moab last week. Man I fell in love, there was nothing it couldn't do extremely well...sorry for adding to your indecision

  14. #14
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    Can't do a dual ring chain guide on a 2011 Reign, (unless you count the Kore Reactor chain stay mount type). Stupid press fit BB.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885
    Yeti 575 would feel more XC than Reign, I think it's the taller size and geometry it's almost a size bigger than other competitors. It feels more XC than my 5.5" Ibis Mojo for sure.
    So hilarious.

    How does a bike "feel more XC"?

    And saying a 575 is "more XC" than a piece-of-dung Ibis Mojo... ultra-hilarious. You're talking about the tail-waggy, tail-twisty long-legged XC bike that is bought and loved for its carbon blinginess and not its ride. Hilarious.

    YouYou... youyou. All about youyou. The Mojo is a premier pose-bike though. Gets lots of trailhead commentary I'm sure. Lots of people with yuppie-envy probably admire it.

    The 575 is the smoothest and most-composed descender of any 5" - 6" trail bike I've ever owned or ridden, and I've owned and ridden quite a few. How it can feel "more XC" than the others in its travel/geometry class is a gigantic mystery to me, but that might be due to my assessing it based on its ride rather than its Internet Speculation Quality.

    No, I don't work for Yeti.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ash T. Abula
    So hilarious.

    How does a bike "feel more XC"?

    And saying a 575 is "more XC" than a piece-of-dung Ibis Mojo... ultra-hilarious. You're talking about the tail-waggy, tail-twisty long-legged XC bike that is bought and loved for its carbon blinginess and not its ride. Hilarious.

    YouYou... youyou. All about youyou. The Mojo is a premier pose-bike though. Gets lots of trailhead commentary I'm sure. Lots of people with yuppie-envy probably admire it.

    The 575 is the smoothest and most-composed descender of any 5" - 6" trail bike I've ever owned or ridden, and I've owned and ridden quite a few. How it can feel "more XC" than the others in its travel/geometry class is a gigantic mystery to me, but that might be due to my assessing it based on its ride rather than its Internet Speculation Quality.

    No, I don't work for Yeti.
    Last time I checked the geo for yeti is different as well as different suspension systems. So in that way they would ride differently. If I could punch you in the nuts I would.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ash T. Abula

    The 575 is the smoothest and most-composed descender of any 5" - 6" trail bike I've ever owned or ridden, and I've owned and ridden quite a few. How it can feel "more XC" than the others in its travel/geometry class is a gigantic mystery to me, but that might be due to my assessing it based on its ride rather than its Internet Speculation Quality.

    No, I don't work for Yeti.
    Leaving aside your "hilarious" comments, could you elaborate your impressions on the Yeti 575?

    So far I have read around that the rear triangle was a bit flexy, but apparently the 2011 change the geometry a bit and the rear triangle has been stiffened up, which makes it the best 575 to date. Can anyone comment on this?

  18. #18
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    Abeit long, here's an excellent review on the redesigned 2011 575 found here:
    2011 Yeti 575 Frame Review

    I've owned both the a 2010 575, and the new 2011 575, and I can agree with everything said in this review.


    Quote Originally Posted by stoney98
    Bike Review: 2011 Yeti 575
    Regularly Ridden Comparable Frames: 2008 Santa Cruz Nomad, 2009 Yeti 575 Carbon (prior bike), 2009 Ibis Mojo HD w/ Lopes links, Turner 5-Spot (non-DW)
    Bike Build:
    Frame: 2011 Yeti 575 - White (XL)
    Fork: 2010 Fox 36 Float RC2 - set to 145mm
    Headset: King 1.125" Upper Cup / Cane Creek 1.5" Zerostack Lower Cup
    Stem: Thomson 60mm
    Bars: Easton Carbon DH
    Grips: ODI Ruffian
    Seatpost: Crank Bros Joplin R
    Saddle: WTB Laser Ti
    Brakes: Avid Juicy 7 185mm F / 165mm R
    Shifter (R): Sram X7
    Derailleur (R): Sram X9
    Crank/BB: Shimano XT - 32 tooth - 175mm
    Guide: e.13 LG1
    Wheels: Hope Pro 2 - Mavic 819 (R), Hope Bulb - Mavic 819 (F)
    Tires: Maxxis High Roller 2.35 Tubeless (F), Maxxis Crossmark 2.35 Tube (R)
    Pedals: Shimano XT
    Chain: Sram higher end something
    Cassette: Sram higher end something
    Weight: Somewhere in 30 range +/- 1#
    It's been a while since I've done an in-depth review, but I figured it's about time as I have not seen one yet. I've had my 575 for about five months and have somewhere north of 600 miles on it. My normal riding conditions vary between rocky, technical climbing/descending to smooth, pump and flow trails. It has seen all riding conditions except snow. My normal ride loop varies between 7 and 25 miles with elevation gain between 1,000 and 4,000 feet gross.
    To start with, the fit of the bike is very center balanced. Running the Crank Bros. seatpost with a 1" setback has forced me to slide the saddle forward 1" to keep centered on the bike. It was definitely built as an aggressive, downhill oriented trail bike but still climbs reasonably well. It does feel to have a slightly longer wheelbase, which is trademark Yeti.
    When doing the frame up build-up, it is very clear that the frame was designed around a 150mm Fox 32. The handling and climbing characteristics change noticeably when you put a taller fork onto the frame. I initially ran it with a Fox 36 set at 160mm and had to install a zero rise lower cup and drop my fork travel to 145mm to get my axle-to-crown height within 2mm of the OEM spec 150mm Fox 32. With the taller 160mm fork, you immediately notice the additional BB height and slacker head angle. Even with the slacker head angle, it is very difficult to offset the additional ride height from the increased bb height. The bike felt that it wanted to loop out climbing and very unstable descending. After dropping the fork travel and installing the zero stack lower cup, the climbing and handling characteristics felt well tuned.
    The major changes from the 2009/10 frames are:
    - .25" lower BB
    - 1* slacker HT angle
    - 12mm bolt through rear axle
    - Aluminum box section chainstays
    - 1.125" to 1.5" HT - 2" shorter than prior models
    - Changed leverage ratio to provide a better pedaling platform
    There are others, but these are the ones that really make a difference.
    One of the major problems with the 2009 Yeti 575 was the flex coming out of the back-end. Under any type of weighted turning you could feel the frame flex badly and would hear the brake start rubbing. Under extremely hard cornering I had the rear wheel shift in the dropouts on multiple occasions. Even after switching to a bolt-on rear wheel, the problems did not abate. While I am a big guy at 230+, I did not see these problems from the Mojo or Nomad. The addition of the aluminum box chain-stays did add notable weight to the back-end of the bike, but this weight easily offsets the flex of prior models. I am currently running a QR on the rear but have a 12mm axle kit I need to install. I can only imagine the increase in stiffness, as this is currently the stiffest trail bike I have ever ridden.
    As I have not ridden the 12mm rear axle kit I cannot comment to the performance. One point to be aware of though is that the frame kit does not include the 12mm axle or conversion kit. The kit includes both the conversion kit and DT-Swiss 12mm QR axle, but you will need to order these parts from Yeti.
    The lower bottom bracket and slightly slacker head angle definitely accommodate a more aggressive downhill rider. You can clearly feel the dropping of your center of gravity and combined with the slacker head angle the bike feels much more in control at speed. I do find that I hit my pedals when climbing in technical terrain though, which is a risk with the lower BB height. Climbing with the slacker HA does lead to wider sweeps when taking switchbacks. This forces you to use more power when making these type of turns as you end up effectively pivoting on your rear wheel.
    The changed leverage ratio on the shock is a huge improvement over prior models. As a larger rider, I tend to have my shock air pressure towards the max end of the range. On the 09/10 models I always felt I was wallowing at ~50% of travel at max shock pressure. There is now a distinct platform at ~30% shock travel in which I find the bike sitting during most sit and pedal sections. Once you get past that threshold in technical climbing, it does begin to feel softer. It's not a bad softer, but it's noticeable.
    There are a few small nuances with the design that border on nuisances. *removed part re: seat post cable routing*. My other complaint is the low on the down-tube location of the cable/hose routing. To have enough cable/hose to allow for a full 180* spin on the bars (see crashing), the cables will rub on the top of your fork. While this doesn't sound bad, if you are not paying attention it will cut into the fork.Go ahead and ask me how I know this... You will need to put some 3M clear tape onto the fork to protect it. I've also noticed this rubbing on my lower headset cup when running a 1.125" steerer. The downsized lower cup creates a bit of space that the cables fit into nicely causing the rubbing.
    On the flip side, the addition of the ISCG-05 mount makes for much easier guide mounting. Mounting a DRS on my 09/10 frame was a giant pain in the ass. It took me a whopping four minutes to install my LG1, including adding spacers to the sliders. *Re: drop seat post - I talked with Yeti and they recommend routing the line through the front mount of the shock. This removes the need for a rear cable mount. I still think there should be a true rear mount, possibly on a small pivot to keep the line clean* The forethought to add cable mounts for a drop seat post is a nice touch, but it needs a rear mount.
    As this is a dual purpose bike - for climbing and descending - I will break out the ride for each.
    When descending a quick drop of the seat post will open up your cockpit, allowing you to very easily take advantage of the good center balance of the bike. The Fox RP23 with pro-pedal makes for a noticeable difference in how you ride the bike while descending. If you are riding more rolling single track leaving the prop-pedal engaged allows you to quickly pedal out of corners while still getting full usage of your travel. It seems to ramp up a bit faster providing a stiffer base as you get deeper into the travel. On long descents switching off pro-pedal (aka. ‘the Fun Switch’) dramatically changes descending prowess of the bike. It opens up the back end to a suppler ride that is very reminiscent of older era downhill bikes (pre-2004). It is extremely compliant and you cannot feel when/if you bottom the travel, but after every long descent the travel gauge (little rubber donut) is at the bottom of the shock.
    It has a very characteristically Yeti downhill feel that allows you to comfortably take your fingers off the levers and just let it ride. On deeply rutted trails, as long as you can keep your shoulders straight the bike holds stable in straight lines. I have noticed on steep, kicky lips that it tends to rotate forward a bit. On more high speed natural terrain lips, the bike flies stable. It is very flickable in the air and allows for easy direction changes. Jumping into corners is stable, as is jumping into a rough landing.
    There are downsides to its descending characteristics too. On tight, steep switchbacks the length the wheelbase makes it difficult to cut the turns. In mid-speed switchbacks you need to break the back-end away and let the tire slide to get a better rotation into the corner. The other major short coming in descending is a traditional single-pivot issue: brake lock. As the trail gets rougher and you really want your suspension to work, if you are on the brakes it just doesn’t work that well. I’ve only noticed this at high speeds in very rough terrain, but it’s noticeable enough that it will likely change your riding style. It reminds me very much of the single pivot Turner DHR in this regard. As long as you aren’t riding the brakes or trying to slow down in the rough, the bike just wants to rip. The upside to this characteristic is that it will make you a faster rider. By forcing you to brake in straight lines and trusting your bike in the rough stuff, you will inevitably ride fast with more control. As I described in my Turner review, if you are not used to that type of riding it will scare the piss out of you until you are.
    Climbing was even better than the 09/10 575 (which was almost 1# lighter) and the Ibis. With pro-pedal on the suspension is active enough to keep good bite without bobbing. On a wide-open fire road climb you will not like this bike. Compared to a bike like the Ibis or any other full carbon it weighs 1# more and the suspension is more active. It excels in technical climbing though. The rougher the terrain gets, the more consistently the suspension acts and is very easy to load and un-weight when going over irregular rocks and roots. The centered balance of the bike allows you to gain traction or steering control through minor weight shifts. I am running a single-ring up front (32th), so I can not attest to granny gear climbing. Based on riding other Yeti MacPherson strut bikes I do not believe there would be any detrimental pedaling issues. Climbing with the pro-pedal off is miserable as the pedal bob is energy draining.
    As an all-around bike, I would define this as a gravity oriented bike. This bike will allow you to get to the top without wanting to kill yourself, but will really show it’s true colors once turned downhill. If you are a ride up so that you can ride down type of rider, this is a great selection. You will not get to the top of the hill first as it does have a weight penalty for the added stiffness, but you can put on high mileage rides. Just don’t try to beat your friends to the top unless you are an ox.
    Maintain internal heights.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by macming
    I have a pretty sweet Nomad built up, and as nice as they are, I wouldn't go and drop $5k on a Nomad when you already have a capable frame.

    here is what I would do: look for used parts on Pinkbike and here. It may take a while, but it'll pay off

    - 150mm Float/Van w/ 15mm qr fork : $400
    - new wheelset (or at least new front) : $500
    - KS i950r post : $250
    - chain guide/bash : $100
    - rear shock tuning to PUSH: $200

    That only puts you up to $1450. Assuming you can sell your old parts for $500, you are only at $1k, with a lot of stuff you probably don't really need, and parts nicer than a brand new bike. Also, I'd forget about travel adjust forks. I had a TALAS and never used it. I can climb on my Nomad just fine with a 180mm Marz RC3 Ti.

    Best of luck!
    thanks for the advice, the TALAS gets used a lot around here, the climbs can be to steepy and they get very difficult to climb with the talas in the 140mm setting. or a 2 step lyrik, all i need is 120mm to climb when it gets hard and the rest to bomb down.

    Any particular wheelset recommended, strong, light, bit wider than normal AM?

  20. #20
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by RubberSideUp
    After riding a Maestro (or VPP,DW) bike for years I think you would be disappointed with the performance of the single pivot 575. Single pivots are fine (I love my '03 Heckler) but Maestro is better. Stiffer while climbing and more plush when descending.

    At least this is what I have found based on riding and owning many different suspension designs.
    thanks this is very useful,


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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by nixgame22
    Abeit long, here's an excellent review on the redesigned 2011 575 found here:
    2011 Yeti 575 Frame Review

    I've owned both the a 2010 575, and the new 2011 575, and I can agree with everything said in this review.

    Awesome review! thanks for sharing it!

    Although from it I conclude that I love the looks of the 575, but definitely I am a "Maestro" rider. ahh well maybe when I win the lotto I can have both just for pure guilty pleasure

  22. #22
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    Oct 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by cesalec
    thanks for the advice, the TALAS gets used a lot around here, the climbs can be to steepy and they get very difficult to climb with the talas in the 140mm setting. or a 2 step lyrik, all i need is 120mm to climb when it gets hard and the rest to bomb down.

    Any particular wheelset recommended, strong, light, bit wider than normal AM?
    I personally like a good hubset, and own by Chris King and Industry 9. As far as rims, I like true UST profile rims, and wider than 21mm internal width.

    I have a combination of Mavic 819, 823, and DT 5.1Ds. Stan's Flow rims are also really popular.

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