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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Finius T Flubberbuster's Avatar
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    Trek Slash Geometry

    Anyone here ride a Trek Slash? Did it take a while to get used to the short cockpit created by the steep seat tube angle? Did u get an OTB sensation for a while? Are ther benefits to the steep SA I'm not seeing yet? I had I put a longer stem in it to feel comfortable. Any input woul be appreciated.
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  2. #2
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    It took me a couple of weeks to get used to it. I came from a Med. trek fuel ex 8. As a matter of fact, I just installed a 35 mm stem on mine with 780mm bars. I wish I had done this a while ago. I would say that the SA helps to keep you centered on the bike in an odd way. It doesn't bother me.

  3. #3
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    hardly an otb feel. the bike is nice and slack, take your weight off the front end and transfer your weight to the rear when its rocky. bikes like the slash have more potential than most riders can tap into immediately.

  4. #4
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    That's the tough part so far, keeping weight in the rear. When I raise the seat to get good leg extension I am higher but a little too forward than I'd like to be. How tall are you and what size frame are you riding?
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  5. #5

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    It sounds like what you need is a dropper post.
    If you're using the post raised all the time, you'll have a hard time getting the weight transferred to the back and staying loose at the same time.

  6. #6
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    I'm 6'2", 180lbs.
    I ride an XL Slash 9, custom build, with a 50mm stem, 720mm bars.
    I NEVER feel like the geometry puts me over the bars, in fact I have to consciously place my weight over the bars if the terrain requires it because I think this bike likes a back seat rider. I feel very balanced on the bike, and I like the steeper seat angle for climbing, because this thing does get a bit sluggish on the climbs and slow speed riding.

  7. #7
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    I don't ride a slash, I wasn't a fan of the rear end, it felt dead to me like the reign series of bikes. I ride an Enduro which has the same travel/geometry. A dropper post does wonders for these kind of bikes or simply get off the bike and drop the post when things point down.

    Since the bikes have a lot of travel and the rear suspension is really active you can get an OTB feel if you're sitting too high in the saddle on rough stuff or even simple up and down stuff. The suspension will compress and rebound quickly giving you that OTB feel. You can always slow your rebound but then your suspension can pack up quickly when its really aggressive. I ride a with fast rebound and I stand up whenever things are rough and bend my knees and lean back a little to use my body suspension to avoid that OTB feeling.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the feedback. Sounds like a just gotta give the bike a few more good rides. It did come with a reverb post which I love...gotta start remembering to use it in the trail now.
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  9. #9
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    Try,

    Add a few clicks (more) of low speed compression in your fork
    Take a click or two (faster) rebound out of the front fork
    Add a click or two of more (slower) rebound in the rear

    Most of the time when I find people that have the OTB feeling on a bike the front end brake dives way to much in steep stuff (low speed compression) and the front rebound is to slow to recover by the time in a split second that it takes to hit the rear tire the back is already rebounding faster. Giving the bike a forward bucking feeling compounded by the lack of low speed compression and brake dive. Causing a OTB feeling on a bike that already has slack angles. Just food for thought.

  10. #10
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    a longer stem might increase the otb sensation you speak of.

    does the bike fit well?

    are you used to having 160mm of suspension?

  11. #11
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    I see a lot of advantages to a steeper STA, and I've been completely sold on the slack HTA, steep STA combination, in my case on a Banshee Prime. There have been a number of discussions about this style of geometry in the Banshee forum as people are getting ready for the v2 Rune.

    I think it works better for steep, rugged climbs because the saddle position is farther forward giving me better weight distribution while I'm still sitting. The shorter cockpit also puts you in a more upright position, and that might take some adjustment if you're used to stretching out and supporting yourself on your hands. I've never noticed any tendency towards an OTB feeling, since I'm almost always out of the saddle if I'm not pedaling. That's not to say I've never gone over the bars - sometimes there's no vaccine for stupid. But I don't think the steep STA lends itself to that.
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  12. #12
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    umm...with top tube lengths being equal between bikes, a steeper seat tube angle makes for a longer cockpit when it matters (out of the saddle for dh/aggressive riding) because it increases the horizontal distance between BB and head tube (reach). if you had a bike with a slacker seat angle before and put your old seatpost in the new frame, then when sitting and pedaling it will move your butt closer to the bars and not as far behind the pedals. Unless you like it that way for climbing; try moving your saddle back on the rails or get a setback seatpost. A longer stem will only increase the otb feel. to really see how the cockpit feels, drop that seat out of the way and dont worry about it, find some steeps get off the saddle and see how far you can get your weight back.. When riding aggressively out of the saddle, the only contact points that matter are your pedals and grips, so top tube length and seat angle become meaningless and "reach" and "stack" become the important numbers for bike fitting.
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  13. #13
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    Assuming you're replying to me, my comment about the shorter cockpit was in the context of climbing. I agree with everything you wrote: I actually wrote a couple sentences about reach vs. ETT but deleted them from my post before submitting to avoid complicating it. My current frame has a shorter ETT but a longer reach than the frame it replaced. And I think that's a real improvement.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  14. #14
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    I guess it's not really an OTB feel, just the shorter cockpit. It does feel great for DH but this bike is my AM ride so I'm hoping to get more comfortable with the shorter cockpit. I guess it will be better for climbing, I think it's mainly the flat technical stuff and being in the more upright position that will take some getting used to.
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  15. #15
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    evasive, i was replying to the original post. Finius, have you tried moving teh seat back, or a setback seatpost?
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  16. #16
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    The seat is back all the way already. It has a reverb in it which I want to keep so I'm just gonna have to get used to it. The longer stem helped. It worst comes to worst I may try the set back post but for now I'm gonna give this set up a whirl once the snow melts here in PA.
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  17. #17
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    Slash, Scratch, Remedy

    I only rode the Slash at a Trek demo day but it felt fantastic.
    Currently I have newer models of the Remedy, Scratch & Session.
    I have made small adjustment/s such as Stem, Bars & Crank-set length to each of them to get the perfect "fit".
    Now that I have the "fit" they are amazing.
    I am sure the Slash would be similar.
    Just make 1 adjustment at a time and give yourself a few rides with each new adjustment before you change something else.
    Hope that helps.

  18. #18
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    If you have your seat slammed all the way back and put a longer stem on the Slash you may be causing your own problems. You're essentially stretching yourself out more by doing this, which causes you to use your arms more instead of your core to create and maintain your balance. Doing this would cause an unbalanced sensation, combined with a fork that has a lot of travel and might not be tuned correctly would cause a diving in the fork. Add that diving to an unbalanced body position and you'd have that OTB feeling pretty easily.

    Personally, I would try bringing your saddle back to the middle position on the rails, increase your low speed compression in the fork, increase the rebound of the fork by a click or two, and slow down the rebound on the rear of the bike by a click.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by monty797 View Post
    If you have your seat slammed all the way back and put a longer stem on the Slash you may be causing your own problems. You're essentially stretching yourself out more by doing this, which causes you to use your arms more instead of your core to create and maintain your balance. Doing this would cause an unbalanced sensation, combined with a fork that has a lot of travel and might not be tuned correctly would cause a diving in the fork. Add that diving to an unbalanced body position and you'd have that OTB feeling pretty easily.

    Personally, I would try bringing your saddle back to the middle position on the rails, increase your low speed compression in the fork, increase the rebound of the fork by a click or two, and slow down the rebound on the rear of the bike by a click.
    Good advice, IMO.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  20. #20
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    Did you say it had an OTB feel so you put a longer stem on it??? Buy a 50mm stem slam it get normal sized bars for your shoulders and drop the seat post about halfway from good pedaling position take the bike to some steep scary stuff and then make some adjustments.. then throw your 90mm stem in the trash

  21. #21
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    I'd be hesitant to run the seat all the way back on a reverb. I cracked the top cap/ seal on my first one, and I think that might have contributed to its demise.
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  22. #22
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    Seat post question

    Does anyone else have a standard seat tube in a trek slash? I can't seem to get the seat post to sit into the seat tube more than about 6"...so I can't get the seat anywhere near low enough to ride properly downhill...do I just NEED to have a reverb or am I missing something obvious?

    Thanks!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesdunn View Post
    Does anyone else have a standard seat tube in a trek slash? I can't seem to get the seat post to sit into the seat tube more than about 6"...so I can't get the seat anywhere near low enough to ride properly downhill...do I just NEED to have a reverb or am I missing something obvious?

    Thanks!
    take the post out spit on the hole and slam it in.. dont forget to buy roses

  24. #24
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    What, not even dinner?

  25. #25
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    It really doesn't seem like it wants to go...any thoughts would be appreciated!? Thanks.

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