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  1. #1
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    Those of you with a 1x set-up... why don't you use a remote lockout?

    Just out of curiosity, for those of you who have a bike capable of a remote suspension lockout, along with a 1x set-up, why don't you have utilize one?

    Coming off of a 2x set-up (with dropper) I am finding that with my newly less taxed left hand that a remote lockout seems like an awesome idea... being able to switch to WFO for the gnar, and then going medium or firm for the flats and climbs, always having the right setting for the right type of trail at any given moment. Haven't seen a trail really that being in one setting the whole time is optimal.

    Seems like a logical step to me for bikes once the left shifter has been removed, but I notice that out of the hundreds of bikes that have come through our LBS that not one of them has a remote lockout on it.

    What is the reasoning? Not saying that you all should have one, I am just curious as to why choose not to as it seems that the bulk of the all mountain / trail community has done.

  2. #2
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    Choose the right bike???

    My wife and I have had two variations of late model Treks with the "Reaktiv" shock and they've mostly been set and forget. The occasions to think about or use the suspension lever are never any where I'd want to add complication or anything to the bike. I'll move to firm for the 2 mi from driveway way to trailhead, and for lift served that's been set and forget.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  3. #3
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    The cost of converting the rear shock to a remote lockout is too costly.

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  4. #4
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    I don't want to forget to unlock it when the trails points down. And my bike has a good pedaling platform, so I don't feel that a lockout helps very much.

  5. #5
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    Buy a bike that doesn't need a shock lockout to pedal well. Besides, left side is where dropper remote goes.

  6. #6
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    The point of 1x is simplifying, weight reduction, and having one less thing to think about. A remote lockout adds that back in, and if you have a bike that is matched well for the trails you ride, then a remote lockout becomes less beneficial. Also as mentioned above, left side is for dropper remote.

  7. #7
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    I ride a Knolly, which has a very active suspension design, and have no need for a remote lockout. The dropper remote goes where the front shifter used to, back in the bad old days, and is 100 times more useful than a remote lockout. I engage the climb switch on logging roads only, and always flip it open before hitting the trail, up or down. Might be useful for a super weenie xc racer.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  8. #8
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    Oh I have the perfect bike for my trails, dialed suspension in with the right amount of travel and ReAktiv keeps my suspension from "needing" to be switched, and I could just set it to trail and forget it.

    But I do notice that bombing down techy hills is slightly more pleasant with the suspension flipped to fully open and I do notice that pedaling up a smooth steep incline is slightly more pleasant with the suspension on firm.

    I have a dropper and I have a 1x specific remote on my left side but it wouldn't get in the way of a remote lock-out.

    (Just in defense of why I ask)

    I know I don't need one at all, but if I got a really good deal on one and didn't have to struggle too much installing it then I don't see why not personally. I'm just interested in the various reasons why not.

  9. #9
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    I never lock my suspension out. Never want to. It's always open. Bike pedals fine and nothing to remember to do.

    I can't count the number of times I've waited for others at the bottom of a run and once they arrive & calm down, they look at their bike and say, "Shucks! I forgot to unlock my suspension!"

    But I wouldn't lock mine out even if I knew I'd never forget to unlock it at the top of the hill. I just don't see why. I'd rather own a frame that pedals well wide open.
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  10. #10
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    I also picked a bike that doesn't seem to need one. Looking at the bike on Linkage Design, it seems obvious Diamondback chose to optimize pedaling even at the expense of some other behavior.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotth72 View Post
    left side is where dropper remote goes.
    ^this.

    I wear out my dropper post.

  12. #12
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    Even without a dropper, I found the remote lockout went completely unused. I still have it on my hardtail, but I dont miss it on my primary bike, since replacing the damper. High/Low compression is more useful to me than a lockout.

  13. #13
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    First thing I did when I dumped my front derailleur and upgraded my rear shock. Makes much more sense than a remote lockout for the fork.

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  14. #14
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    Number 1: dropper lever is there
    Number 2: my hardtail rear is always locked
    always mad and usually drunk......

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg71 View Post
    Number 1: dropper lever is there
    Number 2: my hardtail rear is always locked
    Solid reasoning on number 2. I guess I should specify that this is more of a question towards dualies as fork lockouts I agree, by themselves not really that useful.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by drdocta View Post
    What is the reasoning? Not saying that you all should have one, I am just curious as to why choose not to as it seems that the bulk of the all mountain / trail community has done.
    Because suspension lockout is a big marketing scam.

    On a less hyperbolic note, I use the compression lever on my shock once or twice in a ride, at the bottom of the massive road climbs. Anything off road the shock is left open, the bike grips and pedals great. 1 by was pretty much the death of pedal bob, a bike designed around a 30-34t chainring doesn't have the massively altering chain growth that a bike running 22-32-42 triple does. Even my single pivot Cotic spins along very nicely.

    Also, the left shifter is now the dropper lever.

  17. #17
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    i change it to medium or firm only on fire roads/logging roads so a remote isnt really necessary
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  18. #18
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    I hate messing with switches, rather focus on the trail. My climbs, I'd rather have an active suspension.

  19. #19
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    Did anyone say "good suspension doesn't need a lockout" yet?
    2016 SC 5010
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  20. #20
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    My lock out is my right hand reaching down to the fork and locking it.
    I ride a SS HT so I normally only lock it out on long climbs and I always have time to unlock it neat the top.
    Above that, I leave my shit open and just ride the bike.
    Too Many .

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle242gt View Post
    Did anyone say "good suspension doesn't need a lockout" yet?
    I don't think anyone did, but it's true.


    Me, i have a transition suppressor for a dually, it has a 2x. It's a touch mushy in the big ring, but in the small ring it pedals superbly- it's like a lockout lever built in to the FD. Shifting to the granny stiffens the pedaling response without the shitty suspension behavior of a lockout. It's great. A properly executed 1x can be almost as good, and it's a lot easier to implement.

    Really i feel like this is isn't an issue for anyone riding a non-shit suspension. Lockout levers, inertia valves, electronic lockouts, etc etc etc...their time to shine was 10 years ago when horst links and half the dual link suspensions were patented and almost everyone was using poorly optimized suspension and crude air springs. Suspension design is much better now; let that garbage die.




    Unless you're an elite XC racer that stuff is a distraction or a handicap on a decent bike.
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  22. #22
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    World Cup DH racers are stating to use them i.e. remote lockouts on pedaly sections...

    But, I'm no World Cup anything - I don't need it. Plus, my Ape Index is +5, tis easy to reach down and flip switch for climbs.

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  23. #23
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    No room. Left side is where my bell is.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humpy View Post
    No room. Left side is where my bell is.




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  25. #25
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    I find the Re:aktive suspension that Trek has to be really, really sweet.

    Plush, yet firm. I do occasionally lock mine out, and I DO notice a difference, but when on the dirt, I don't really think it makes much of a benefit. I want that small bump compliance on climbs just as much, if not more, than downhills.

    My other bike, very similar suspension design, but only 100mm instead of 140, I don't feel it bobbing either, but it is much firmer overall too. Thats one reason it doesn't bob much.
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle242gt View Post
    Did anyone say "good suspension doesn't need a lockout" yet?
    First reply - get the right bike.

    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by drdocta View Post
    Just out of curiosity, for those of you who have a bike capable of a remote suspension lockout, along with a 1x set-up, why don't you have utilize one?
    Because I ride trails and suspension makes my bike work better why would I want to lock it out?
    Safe riding,

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  28. #28
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    For xc racing at the highest expert and pro levels, a remote lockout is nice, but below those levels, it makes no difference and an efficient bike with suspension that works well all the time is better for all other riding. I bought an FS bik I use the suspension, not lock it out and decrease traction.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  29. #29
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    You frequently see that especially on Scott bikes. I personally believe that a properly designed suspension system does not need a lock out however but I'm kind of a dick about things like that LOL.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scotth72 View Post
    Buy a bike that doesn't need a shock lockout to pedal well. Besides, left side is where dropper remote goes.
    exactly!!!!!

  31. #31
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    I demoed a Scott spark that had remote lockout. I used it a lot and really liked having it on the bars. Open mode wasn't great on flat or uphill trail. Same trails on my intense spider I've literally never used anything but open setting. I was basically the same speed on both bikes in terms of Strava times but spent meaningfully more time in the air on the intense

    So I'd say if you find you use lo much put it on the bars. Some bikes pedal well enough that lo isn't really needed.

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  32. #32
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    I think if my bike came with it...it'd probably use it. I demo'd a bike that came with a front lockout...and I was constantly using it. When I got back on my bike...it wasn't something I missed...and still don't.

  33. #33
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    When running a coil I would highly consider one if available.

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  34. #34
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    I got the Cane Creek OPT for a DB Il on a Knolly Endorphin, mainly because it mounted on to the Cane Creek DrOPT remote. The climb switch on a CC has a range between on and off and the remote I figured would be handy to have. I never used the climb switch before getting the remote. I used it a few times the first ride then took it off. It gave me an option I didn't need and just cluttered the handlebar. Then I got a coil and don't think about anything because it just works.

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