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  1. #1
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    Sports Authority DB Topanga Vs. REI Novara Bonanza

    Hi, Friday I purchased the Diamond Back Topanga from Sports Authority. I only put 16miles on it thus far and my Gears a jumping around really bad. It's annoying if I'm gonig up hill and it starts skipping. I read on here that buying from places like Sports Authority is bad because they don't know how to put bikes together. I just got the bike, I don't think I need a tune-up within 16miles??

    Also, I think the Topanga is special for sports authority, I believe it's the "response" bike.

    This is the REI bike I have my eye on. My Girlfriend has the Bonita and has been loving the bike. I like the way REI gave her a bike a pre-sale checkup and just generally knew about the bike. The guy at Sports authority didn't know anything about mountain bikes.. he even suggest I try to goto *****!

    This is the Novara Bonanza I like.

    http://www.rei.com/product/760851


    I'm looking for a Good beginner bike w/ disc brakes less then $500.. best bang for my buck

  2. #2
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    Your post is a little confusing. Did you take the bike back to Sports Authority and get a refund?

    The Diamondback didn't need a tune-up; it's derailler was probably never adjusted properly from the outset. Diamondbacks are fine bikes and even low end Shimano deraillers work great, but they have to be set up correctly. If you still have the Diamondback, and it fits you well, just take it down to a shop and have them adust the deraillers and brake cables. Shouldn't be very expensive. Consider your lesson learned, and never ever EVER buy bicycle stuff at Sports Authoriy (or Dick's) again.

    If you already got rid of the Diamondback, the REI bike looks fine. But don't forget that for a beginner bike, fit is way more important than "bang for the buck". Frames are all the same - relative heavy aluminum. No way around that. The components on entry-level bikes are all more or less equal. Sure one maker might put a fancier rear derailler on than another, but the important components like wheels and bottom brackets, etc, are pretty much all the same. You'll be more efficient and comfortable on a well-fitted bike with bottom-end components than a bike that's too small or too big, even if its outfitted with top-shelf racing level stuff. That, by the way, is the main reason that most folks recommend buying from an actual bike shop rather than a big box store - because they can at least get you sized up correctly, if not do a full fitting. Oh yeah, and they adjust your deraillers. If you don't have any moral issues with patronizing "big business" instead of the little guys, Performance often has good deals on entry level bikes, if you have one near by. REI is fine too, in my experience, but it probably varies from store to store, so do your homework. Whatever you do, get the bike that fits and rides best, even if its not the "screaming deal" with the slightly nicer components. Most definitely steer clear of buying off the internet.

  3. #3
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    FWIW, I think a little gear jumping from a brand new bike with a few miles on new cables is pretty common. I just bought a brand new bike and also built up a new to me frame both with high to mid spec parts and both shifter flawlessly on the stand, however after a few trail miles I had to adjust the cables at the shifter to accomodate for some cable stretch. Again pretty common in my opinion.
    Brandon
    09 Santa Cruz Superlight
    00 Diamondback XR-4
    99 Specialized S-Works

  4. #4
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    I didn't return the bike yet. I wanted to wait to see what the general consensus was prior to doing so. If the bike can be adjusted to spec, I won't have a problem with it. I just want to make sure it's right. I hate buying stuff and it not working right. I thought I did enough research, but apparently I didn't.

    If the gears are jumpy due to some minor adjustment, that's fine. I just didnt think a tune-up would need to take place within 16miles of owning the bike.

    Dennis

  5. #5
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    They should have made you aware of this as when purchasing a new bike or even rerouting cables on an old bike the cables will stretch. There is a barrel adjustment on the shifter pods or grip shift that you will have to turn about a 1/2 a turn to compensate for the stretch in the new cables. Also another maintenance point with a new bike is wheels. After a good beating on the trails or about 50miles or so I would take it in to get re tensioned as the spokes also come loose after initial use.

  6. #6
    trail addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by huck*this
    They should have made you aware of this as when purchasing a new bike or even rerouting cables on an old bike the cables will stretch. There is a barrel adjustment on the shifter pods or grip shift that you will have to turn about a 1/2 a turn to compensate for the stretch in the new cables. Also another maintenance point with a new bike is wheels. After a good beating on the trails or about 50miles or so I would take it in to get re tensioned as the spokes also come loose after initial use.
    Yeah, but that is like 30 day maintenance. If his gears are skipping from day #1, then there is a good chance that EVERYTHING needs some attention before the "break-in" period (then any flaws can be addressed with cable tension)... H/L limit screws-fr and rr, B-screw, chain length, front d alignment. While we are at it, check that your stem bolts are all snug, brakes are adjusted and snug. You might want to have someone who knows what they are talking about watch you ride and help with handlebar position, seat position, etc.

    I wish i could give the OP some references on all this, but I just kinda picked it all up along the way. Maybe someone could suggest a website or a book. Or he should check with a LBS he trusts.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Six Pack
    Yeah, but that is like 30 day maintenance. If his gears are skipping from day #1, then there is a good chance that EVERYTHING needs some attention before the "break-in" period (then any flaws can be addressed with cable tension)... H/L limit screws-fr and rr, B-screw, chain length, front d alignment. While we are at it, check that your stem bolts are all snug, brakes are adjusted and snug. You might want to have someone who knows what they are talking about watch you ride and help with handlebar position, seat position, etc.

    I wish i could give the OP some references on all this, but I just kinda picked it all up along the way. Maybe someone could suggest a website or a book. Or he should check with a LBS he trusts.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolandjd

    Great info!

    Thanks for sharing.

  9. #9
    rider of bicycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolandjd
    Beat me to it, I was going to post that link.

    To the original poster, read Sheldon's website thoroughly, there's heaps on excellent info there.

  10. #10
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    Nothing wrong with Sports authority or ***** bikes. Great entry level parts and bikes. You just got to give them a good look over befor riding.

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