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  1. #1
    spec4life???..smh...
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    Spokes: 2.0 vs 2.0/1.8/2.0

    So Im looking to get a wheelset built and have been reading about spoke options. I know im going with DT swiss and brass nipples, but i was reading about the option for the slimmed down 1.8 spokes in the middle.

    The upside as i read is that it saves around 100g per wheel and that spokes hardly ever break in the middle. However, I was wondering if anyone uses this setup on their AM rig or if its more of an XC thing. Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Have same on mine, and have never had a problem.

  3. #3
    mbtr member
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    here's an opinion....
    Double Butted Spoke Gobleyde****
    .

  4. #4
    Brackish
    Reputation: carbuncle's Avatar
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    The only application I use straight-guage spokes for is my big bike for hardcore freeriding and my DJ bike, but otherwise butted spokes are the way to go!

  5. #5
    Double-metric mtb man
    Reputation: Psycho Mike's Avatar
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    There is a reason that many wheelbuilders prefer double butted. As someone who has taken an engineering course or two (materials courses were part of my engineering undergrad degree) and builds my own wheels these days, I also tend to go double butted.

    Straight gauge spokes are stronger in the shaft...that is certainly true...but all the cyclic loading (loading as the wheel goes around) basically goes into the spoke elbows. My experience has been that I get a lot more heads popping off straight gauge spokes. With the double-butted, you get a little bit of relief as the spoke will stretch slightly during the cyclic loading...it isn't much, but that's all it takes to help relieve some of the repetitive stress at the elbow of the spoke and increase the overall longevity.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  6. #6
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    +1 with what Psycho Mike said:
    "With the double-butted, you get a little bit of relief as the spoke will stretch slightly during the cyclic loading...it isn't much, but that's all it takes to help relieve some of the repetitive stress at the elbow of the spoke and increase the overall longevity."
    What I've been taught, and certainly proved out over time. This is a preference with AM wheel applications if you think about it.
    And if the situation, circumstance allows, DT has said that ending with a 15 gauge alloy nip is actually preferable as you are giving material back to the nipple; my experience with DT supercomp spokes has been impressive for example.

  7. #7
    spec4life???..smh...
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    sounds great guys....

    So what about 1.8/1.5/1.8

    is that just pushin my luck....

  8. #8
    Riiiiiide...
    Reputation: PsyCro's Avatar
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by spec4life
    sounds great guys....

    So what about 1.8/1.5/1.8

    is that just pushin my luck....

    uhhh.. go here plz..
    http://forums.mtbr.com/weight-weenies/

  9. #9
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
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    lol...guess thats a clear answer

    thanks for all the help...

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