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  1. #1
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    So I bought a 07 SX trail frame as my only bike (thoughts please)....

    Ok its heavy but it actually climbs fine. Its tiring on longish rides but then I am unfit at the moment.

    I am on the cusp of selling it after only a few weeks. Should I?

    Pros:
    It descends brilliantly- I fitted an Enduro/shorter shock and it has a slack/low shuttle so its quite slack.
    It only bobs 1/4inch on climbs due to pro-pedal working
    It feels very stable
    Its a good size (large)- I'm 6foot tall.

    Cons: Quite heavy (8.5lb)

    I'm currently running 2x2.3 Swampthing tyres and standard build really with Maz 55 forks.

    Am I mad to keep this as a do-it-all trail bike? Most of our trails are rocky.

    It was CHEAP to buy and to sell I'd get the same really. So I'd have to spend $1k+ ontop to get a 'better' (lighter) frame.

    Future upgrades could be Fox float forks, a air shock for longer rides(?).

    Immediate upgrades- lighter ghetto tubeless tyres.

    Friends call it the ' ground anchor'

  2. #2
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    That's one of the best AM frames for a DH minded rider ever made. 8.5lbs isn't that heavy, and shedding a pound anywhere but the rims/tires won't be noticeable on a climb. An air shock would be neutering it.

  3. #3
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    Ta- will focus on the spinning mass - tyres/ghetto is a cheap upgrade after all

  4. #4
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    Swampthings are overkill for anything but deep mud, as that is what they're meant for. you can save a lot of weight and rolling resistance by getting different tires.

  5. #5
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    What rear tyre?

    I was thinking of trying a Specialized Storm control for the rear. What else?

    I've got a HR (big etc), a couple of old continental survival pro's, ardents (fecked) so do need a new one.

  6. #6
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    Is that 8.5lb with shock or frame only? Check out the link below: according to this site, an 09 sx frame size L weighs 8.3 no shock. That puts it around 9 with shock.

    If you choose to keep it change the tires to something that rolls fast like high rollers, specialized chunder or butcher and you'll feel like you dropped a few pounds.

    Full suspension frames - Sick Lines – mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource

  7. #7
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    Mostly dry/hard + not too rocky: Minion DHF 2.3, HR V1 2.3
    Mostly dry/hard and rocky or high speed: Minion DHF 2.5 EXO, HR V1 2.5, Butcher (haven't tried, but should be similar to a DHF), Ardent 2.4 (rear)
    Loamy/loose or mostly damp: HR V2, Muddy Mary, Dirty Dan (front)
    Mostly wet/muddy, but not full soupy mud: Dirty Dan, Swampthing, Muddy Mary (rear)
    Soupy mud: Dirty Dan, any lightweight spike you can find

    Swampthing may/may not be too heavy depending on if you have the dual ply version or the old single ply version.

  8. #8
    RTM
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    You can make a lot of adjustments but if it requires much more than a set of tires, maybe an adjustable headset, to make a bike feel right to YOU on YOUR trails, you're going down a very expensive road to tweak a bike that was built to excel at something else.

    The critical question...Is the SX too much bike because you are out of shape, OR is it honestly overkill for the trails you ride most (in which case, even in shape you may long for something different anyway)?

    It took me years to settle on the right do-it-all bike. I learned it is very important to start with frame geometry, suspension travel and frame/shock weight that is at least in range of the demands of your trails. Fighting against those variables is not good for you, the bike or your wallet.
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  9. #9
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    I'm on a 2006 Enduro Pro, with a longer stroke coil shock (I blew the stock DHX Air...twice) and SX Trail chainstays (original stays cracked). It's practically an SX at this point, with slightly steeper HTA and slightly shorter fork. With a Minion DHF 2-ply on the front and assorted beefy parts it's weighing in at a little over 37lbs, and it's my only off-road bike.

    Climbing on this thing suuuucks, but I've added a 11-36t cassette and that gets me a super low gear for the steep stuff. Granted, that gearing puts me at less than walking pace sometimes but it keeps me spinning vs. hike a biking.

    Anyway, where the bike shines is high speed carving and through techy sections. As much as I complain on the climb, that's all wiped away when the trail turns downhill.

    Would I like a lighter bike? Absolutely. The 2013 S-works Enduro frame looks INSANE and is likely more DH capable than the older models, pedals better and is several pounds lighter. It's also $3500US. But any frame that has similar capability to the SX Trail while being significantly is probably going to have to be carbon, and will be much more expensive.

    Cheap upgrades that I've done and may go back to:
    • Lighter weight tires - I've tried the Speshy Fast Trak Control on the rear and liked it. It didn't grip as well as the Minion DHR that was on there (obviously) but it performed very well on hardpack, loose over hardpack and in the rocks (it's not a mud tire, though). I did get a sidewall tear, and when I replace it it'll be with the Armadillo version with sidewall protection. Maxxis makes a single ply DHF that comes in at a little over 700g and it still pretty stout, could be a good front if your current tires are heavy.
    • Lighter weight rims - you'd have to rebuild the wheels (not cheap, but less than a new frame), but there are some nice, lightweight but heavy duty rims out there now (WTB i23, Pancetti TL28) that would strip a bit off your current rims.
    • Tubeless - I haven't done it yet, but is another good option.


    If you like the performance of the SX Trail, you may regret selling that frame unless you can find something that will be as capable but significantly lighter. Not gonna happen without a significant cash outlay.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcinsc View Post
    i'm on a 2006 enduro pro, with a longer stroke coil shock (i blew the stock dhx air...twice) and sx trail chainstays (original stays cracked). It's practically an sx at this point, with slightly steeper hta and slightly shorter fork. With a minion dhf 2-ply on the front and assorted beefy parts it's weighing in at a little over 37lbs, and it's my only off-road bike.

    Climbing on this thing suuuucks, but i've added a 11-36t cassette and that gets me a super low gear for the steep stuff. Granted, that gearing puts me at less than walking pace sometimes but it keeps me spinning vs. Hike a biking.

    Anyway, where the bike shines is high speed carving and through techy sections. As much as i complain on the climb, that's all wiped away when the trail turns downhill.

    Would i like a lighter bike? Absolutely. The 2013 s-works enduro frame looks insane and is likely more dh capable than the older models, pedals better and is several pounds lighter. It's also $3500us. But any frame that has similar capability to the sx trail while being significantly is probably going to have to be carbon, and will be much more expensive.

    Cheap upgrades that i've done and may go back to:
    • lighter weight tires - i've tried the speshy fast trak control on the rear and liked it. It didn't grip as well as the minion dhr that was on there (obviously) but it performed very well on hardpack, loose over hardpack and in the rocks (it's not a mud tire, though). I did get a sidewall tear, and when i replace it it'll be with the armadillo version with sidewall protection. Maxxis makes a single ply dhf that comes in at a little over 700g and it still pretty stout, could be a good front if your current tires are heavy.
    • lighter weight rims - you'd have to rebuild the wheels (not cheap, but less than a new frame), but there are some nice, lightweight but heavy duty rims out there now (wtb i23, pancetti tl28) that would strip a bit off your current rims.
    • tubeless - i haven't done it yet, but is another good option.


    if you like the performance of the sx trail, you may regret selling that frame unless you can find something that will be as capable but significantly lighter. Not gonna happen without a significant cash outlay.
    exactly

  11. #11
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    do you ride DH type trails with it?
    Y-keep
    N-sell
    do you ride with XC riders or DHers with trail bikes?
    XC-sell
    DH-keep

    if you have the terrrain, the SX is a great bike. if not, go to a 5" bike.

  12. #12
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    Or just ride more. After riding 3-5 times a week for a few monthson my 14.5kg Enduro, I found I could keep up with shaved-leg XC guys on many climbs. A buddy who has a longer cycle commute than I do still has no problem tagging along on a 17kg freerider, just because he's fit.


    That said, I switched to an 11.5kg Stumpjumper recently just because I didn't need all that travel on my home trails...

    I'd say ride a bit more and experiment with tires and ghetto tubeless, weight is totally overrated IMO. The frame won't lose value that quickly.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horacek View Post
    Ok its heavy but it actually climbs fine. Its tiring on longish rides but then I am unfit at the moment.

    I am on the cusp of selling it after only a few weeks. Should I?

    Pros:
    It descends brilliantly- I fitted an Enduro/shorter shock and it has a slack/low shuttle so its quite slack.
    It only bobs 1/4inch on climbs due to pro-pedal working
    It feels very stable
    Its a good size (large)- I'm 6foot tall.

    Cons: Quite heavy (8.5lb)

    I'm currently running 2x2.3 Swampthing tyres and standard build really with Maz 55 forks.

    Am I mad to keep this as a do-it-all trail bike? Most of our trails are rocky.

    It was CHEAP to buy and to sell I'd get the same really. So I'd have to spend $1k+ ontop to get a 'better' (lighter) frame.

    Future upgrades could be Fox float forks, a air shock for longer rides(?).

    Immediate upgrades- lighter ghetto tubeless tyres.

    Friends call it the ' ground anchor'
    If you buy a new frame check Santa Cruz VPLS sale. Good deals to be had.

  14. #14
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    If you want the bike to climb better:

    - Put on a stock length shock. Geometry matters more then just about anything else. The SX Trail has a low BB height already, there's no need to short shock it, and you've made the geo less climbing friendly.

    - Lighten rims/tires if possible. Something like Flow or EX500 rims. Ghetto tubeless won't save you much weight if any. The main reason to go tubeless is to not get flats.

    Non-outer wheel weight doesn't affect climbing appreciably unless you're talking about a LOT of it.

  15. #15
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horacek View Post
    Ok its heavy but it actually climbs fine. Its tiring on longish rides but then I am unfit at the moment.

    I am on the cusp of selling it after only a few weeks. Should I?

    Pros:
    It descends brilliantly- I fitted an Enduro/shorter shock and it has a slack/low shuttle so its quite slack.
    It only bobs 1/4inch on climbs due to pro-pedal working
    It feels very stable
    Its a good size (large)- I'm 6foot tall.

    Cons: Quite heavy (8.5lb)

    I'm currently running 2x2.3 Swampthing tyres and standard build really with Maz 55 forks.

    Am I mad to keep this as a do-it-all trail bike? Most of our trails are rocky.

    It was CHEAP to buy and to sell I'd get the same really. So I'd have to spend $1k+ ontop to get a 'better' (lighter) frame.

    Future upgrades could be Fox float forks, a air shock for longer rides(?).

    Immediate upgrades- lighter ghetto tubeless tyres.

    Friends call it the ' ground anchor'
    I think those tires are slowing you down as much as everything else. Not the weight so much as the rolling resistance. Get something faster rolling, especially in the rear.

    Then see how you like the bike.

    Spending $ soley to lighten this thing up is a poor use of funds, IMO.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  16. #16
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    An argument for short travel

    The sx is a sweet rig, but unless you ride nothing but big gnarly lines, you'll probably have more fun and dial in your skills better on something smaller. Short travel light bikes with appropriate geo for your style/trails are super fun. Many trails are dumbed down too much when I'm on a full blown FR bike, but are a blast on a bike that requires more attention to detail.Here's a good article that may help you decide if you want to stick with heavy long travel, or try light shorter travel:


    The Argument For Short Travel Bikes - Opinion - Pinkbike

  17. #17
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    I agree with others, your main problem with pedaling is those tires.Mega rolling resistance. I have no problem pedaling around my blindside as long as my lighter/less knobby tires are on it (spec Purgatory in rear, Butcher 2.3 in front-I dont like to go too wimpy up front)). My Dh tires are dhr II in back and kenda telonix 2.6 in front, and even those roll way better than a Swampthing. Swamthings are for deep mud, DH only. As long as your terrain calls for it and you are more focused on dh than your uphill times; try the sx with more appropriate tires before you decide to sell it.
    '14 rocky mountain altitude, rally edition
    '11 transition blindside

  18. #18
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    It sounds as if you got a pretty good deal on a very capable bike. I have owned 06 enduro and 08 sxt and they are both fantastic. BUT if it is not the right bike FOR YOU, then it doesn't matter what we say.

    Unless you are competitive or rich, don't let the weight of the frame bother you.

    In my experience, propedal neuters the action of both of those frames-even when dialed all the way "off" it still has an effect and this was verified by the guys at PUSH. My enduro was much better with a vanilla coil and my sxt is much better with push's mx tune. Others love propedal and some say it is necessary for the FSR design, I hated it.

    The advice I can offer is you are best to choose between these three options:

    a) You need to get fitter and really aren't experienced enough to be sure which bike is right for you.... just keep riding the bike and have fun

    b) You really like this bike and want to keep it... mount up some lighter tires (don't go crazy light if you ride in sharp rocks and stuff, use your head) you can also save up for lighter wheels, does your current set-up have a granny ring-if not it could be a headache to make it a more capable climber... if it does, then a 22 chainring to a 34 rear cog could be a nice improvement if you currently have 24 to 32

    c) This bike really isn't for you and you can't get over the fact that your friends call it a ground anchor.... sell it, do your research, and buy something else before this bike turns into a money pit.

    With all that being said, I ride my sxt all over the place and yes, it does suck to pedal sometimes (with coil front and rear), 32 tooth rear cog, not the lightest wheels and tires, but I do love it and I love riding it. I have a second wheelset and tires for lift access and shuttling and I can tell you that it would go from suck to nearly torture to ride with the heavier wheels, all else being equal.... so take that for whatever it is worth to you.

    Then again, my sucky climbs and your sucky climbs are two different things.... same thing with the adjective, "rocky". Hope my advice can be helpful anyway.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

  19. #19
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    Ok I'm not the worlds best rider. Far from it to be honest but the SX makes me feel like it has potential and its helping me, making me better rather than simply 'its over bike/too much'. If that makes sense?

    I don't have any ride photos etc of me (and I'm not a jump/off the ground type rider) - I can do 2ft drop offs etc in a trail which I'm happy with but I must emphasise I'm neither fast or good!

    Heres a vid of me being followed down one of our local/usual trails (Im the rider upfront/green socks):

    A HORA FILM.... - YouTube

    Below is an image of said trail inthe youtube clip (not my pic- just so you can get an idea).



    I am unfit at the moment but saddletime means I will get better and better. I could ride a hardtail in our area however more and more I end the ride with a bad back for days and worn out/beat up. Not as young as I once was!

  20. #20
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    The sx trail seem to be a great freeride bike and it could definitely serve you well in that area.

    If you end up selling it, I would suggest you take a look at titus El Guapo. I do not own one but they are getting good reviews, they have a modern all mountain geometry, are fairly light and are exactly in your price range. It seem like a lot of (new) bike for the money and would probably fit your needs.

  21. #21
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    Keep the sx trail frame, remove the shorter shock, install an appropriate original size rear shock on it. Buy a bearing kit and a full bolt kit and overhaul the frame. You will have a great frame then. Nowadays installing a great shock on that frame is much easier than 5 years ago. The bike is just fine for you. Just keep riding.

  22. #22
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    You'll only sell it anyway Hora
    Santa Cruz Blur TRc

  23. #23
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    If the only problem is its climbing ability, you have no problems.

    Stronger legs come with time, keep riding it and in 6 months you will crush those hills. It already a used bike so its not going to lose value over the next half year, but the new bike your looking at will.
    2012 Giant Reign 1

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horacek View Post
    Ok I'm not the worlds best rider. Far from it to be honest but the SX makes me feel like it has potential and its helping me, making me better rather than simply 'its over bike/too much'. If that makes sense?

    I don't have any ride photos etc of me (and I'm not a jump/off the ground type rider) - I can do 2ft drop offs etc in a trail which I'm happy with but I must emphasise I'm neither fast or good!

    Heres a vid of me being followed down one of our local/usual trails (Im the rider upfront/green socks):

    A HORA FILM.... - YouTube

    Below is an image of said trail inthe youtube clip (not my pic- just so you can get an idea).



    I am unfit at the moment but saddletime means I will get better and better. I could ride a hardtail in our area however more and more I end the ride with a bad back for days and worn out/beat up. Not as young as I once was!
    If that is what you are regularly riding, then your bike is not overkill. Still bigger than I what I personally would chose if I had to pedal it to the top, but a perfectly legit choice nonetheless, and perfect for going down that stuff.

    But I still stand by my advice not to go dumping money into making it lighter.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    If that is what you are regularly riding, then your bike is not overkill. Still bigger than I what I personally would chose if I had to pedal it to the top, but a perfectly legit choice nonetheless, and perfect for going down that stuff.

    But I still stand by my advice not to go dumping money into making it lighter.
    +1

    There are better bikes than the sxt for those trails, but there are also certainly worse bikes, too.

    Lighter/better rolling tires are a reasonable upgrade for you. Then just ride.
    You better just go ahead and drop that seatpost down to the reflector... the trail gets pretty rough down there.

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