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  1. #1
    never ender
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    Should I give eggbeaters another try?

    I just put my old Eggbeaters back on my bike after not using them for about 2 years, since my SPDs are now shot to hell and almost unusable, and now I'm noticing some traits that I really don't like. The pedals feel slippery under my feet-that's the best way to describe it. My heels keep floating around and banging into the crankarm and chainstays. Unclipping feels really odd too-a lot of the time I can't tell whether I'm still in the pedal or not. It also seems next to impossible to unclip unless I'm at the bottom of a pedal stroke. All this has made me a little shaky about riding the beaters on slow rocky terrain...I know from experience that beaters unclip very easily in the middle of an actual crash, but a couple of times on my last ride I stalled and toppled over on a climb because I couldn't get my foot out of the pedal. Also, there's a noticeable side-to-side wiggle between the pedal body and spindle. No fun.

    Now I'm wondering why I bought these things in the first place...oh yeah, they were 50 bucks online. My beaters were part of the original production run, and I remember somebody from Crank Bros telling me that the pedals have been redesigned since then. So my question is, are the newer Eggbeaters any better? They're still some of the cheapest and most durable pedals out there, and they don't pack up in mud. I remember really liking the eggbeaters when I first got them back in 02 or 03 or whenever it was, but now I'm not so sure. I'm in need of new pedals either way, so should I try another pair of Beaters, or go for something else?

  2. #2
    conjoinicorned
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    spd's

    SPD's all the way. why fix what ain't broken?
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  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    If your're spd's are beyond repair, take a look at Time Atacs and Zs.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferday
    SPD's all the way. why fix what ain't broken?
    ummm...his SPDs are broken.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    ummm...his SPDs are broken.
    I think he was talking about the design of SPD's, not his actual pedals.

    To me, it seems like one good hit on a rock with eggbeaters would put them out of commision. But I've never ridden with them. But you did say they were durable so maybe I'm wrong, but it sure seems that way

  6. #6
    never ender
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rover Nick
    I think he was talking about the design of SPD's, not his actual pedals.

    To me, it seems like one good hit on a rock with eggbeaters would put them out of commision. But I've never ridden with them. But you did say they were durable so maybe I'm wrong, but it sure seems that way

    Nope, my SPD pedals are pretty trashed. They've got quite a few miles on them and are about ready for the trash heap.

    The eggbeaters are actually pretty durable. They look wimpy, but they're just as tough as SPDs if not more so. I've hit mine on rocks a million times and haven't bent or broken them. Only problem is that sometimes when they take a severe hit from below, the cage will open and eject your foot from the other side, since the mechanism is all one piece.

  7. #7
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    Check your cleats....

    When my cleats were new, I only had a few degrees of float, and it took some doing to disengage from the pedals...

    But within about five months, my cleats were pretty worn down, seeing as how they're made from a brass alloy. I flipped them around, and they worked almost like new....
    Also, if your 'Beaters are rather old, the springs in them are probably pretty broken-in.... So new cleats are essential to a solid pedal engagement. Mine are pretty broken-in too, but that's only added maybe an extra degree or two of float.
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  8. #8
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    tried em all

    I can honestly say I have tried all three basic flavors intensively- Shimano, Eggs, and Times. (I'd love to try frogs but doubt I will anytime soon) Here's my .02

    Shimanos- more secure, more definite click in/out, very reliable, not too great in mud but OK, not so easy on knees due to lack of float

    Eggs- Cool looking, great in mud, maximum float so probably best for bad knees, least definite click in/out, will eject foot with pedal strikes (very annoying), cleats wear out fast

    Times- combine pretty definite click (like Shimano) with more float, very good in mud, allegedly very reliable

    I REALLY like my Times. I like the moderate amount of float and mud ability over the Shimanos. Eggs have broken down on me, I had the same hard time telling when I was in or out, and I really hate when my foot comes out when I hit something. I tend to do that a lot...

  9. #9
    surly and rigid
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    I will add my 2 cents as well. I used spds until I began destroying the cages around them and parts of the mechanism as well. Went to eggbeaters loved the simplicity and could get in and out ok. Broke 2 pedals on rocks bent a set of the springs and broke one. Got them warrantied and sent them on their way. Love them on my road and fixie bikes. Times are my new favorite. Cant seem to break the springs and the seem to love abuse on the body around the springs. Great in the mud as are Eggbeaters but end all be all found them more reliable over the long haul.

  10. #10
    never ender
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    looks like Times have a lot of fans around here. I'm surprised to hear about people's eggbeaters breaking...up until I started this thread I've never even heard of a bent spindle on Eggbeaters.

    Anyway, sounds like I wouldn't get much improvement by buying a new pair of Beaters. The one thing I like about my SPDs is the clear "click" when getting in and out, and if I can't get that with Beaters, guess I'll find myself a pair of Zs.

  11. #11
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    check out these threads...

    The REAL Crank Brother Pedal Poll

    The REAL Time Pedal Poll

    Some pretty good stuff in these two threads.

  12. #12
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    I tried Shimano and Egg beaters. Here is the all-mountan comparison (=lost of emergency exits on echnical terrain, jump/drops)

    Shimano = fantastic release during emergency - I feel secure going into technical terrain clipped in, knowing I will release the moment I want. They do release a _little_ often during jumps unless I specifically remember not to angle my foot out during the jump.

    Eggs = inconsistent release during emergency. Had LOTS of falls due to them in technical terrain, almost making small dabs into major crashes. I don't trust them at all for all-moutain riding. In jumps though, there are less mistaken releases (and less successful ones as well...)

  13. #13
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    I guess it's just personal preference. I hated SPDs, like having a couple of ice-cubes for pedals and always a faff to get clipped in after stopping. I don't like raw eggbeaters either, not enough foot support, relying too much on your shoe. My favourites for AM are Mallets. Feels like you actually have a proper pedal you can stand on, clips in and out very easily, plenty of float and doesn't release during normal pedalling. Also lighter than the Shimano equivalents with a platform.
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  14. #14
    Bikes!
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    The Crank Brother Smarties are well worth a look, I hated SPDs despite trying to like them for about 4 years, I got rid of mine last year and rode flats ever since. When the Smarties came out I went and pre-ordered some, as my thinking was if I don't like them, they are cheap enough to off-load. However I've been running them for about 6 weeks now and I think they are great. Easy to get in, nearly easy to get out, plenty of support and pretty strong too.

    I'm even considering going for the bling bling Candies they are based on at some point now too...
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  15. #15
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    I learned clipless on Candy's and rode them for two years. Some observations:
    Very intuitive release
    Very easy to clip out
    Lots of float
    Cleats wear out within a couple of months
    No adjustability is really annoying
    Very lightweight.

    I never realized the amount of float eggbeater have until I bought a set of regular Eggs after my Candy pedals had worn out. The tread on my shoe apparently rubbed against the Candy pedal and prevented it from floating as much as possible. When I tried the Eggbeaters I was really uncomfortable with how floaty the pedal was and how easy it was to clip out.

    If you like a secure connection to your bike and ride in rough terrain, I wouldn't recommend the Eggbeaters.

    I returned the Eggbeaters and bought some 959s -- much better

  16. #16
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    Time carbons.

    I have these and like them. They are rebuid-able, shedd mud, and are tunable.
    The only thing I hate is the bronze cleats. I go through 3-4 sets a season, and they aren't cheap at $30 a shot.

    My wife had eggbeaters and hated them. Went back to her spds.

  17. #17
    respect the wildlife
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat_weasel
    I know from experience that beaters unclip very easily in the middle of an actual crash, but a couple of times on my last ride I stalled and toppled over on a climb because I couldn't get my foot out of the pedal.
    Weasel - Same thing for me, here's my thoughts on it.

    You probably already know this, but the angle of release (15 or 20 degrees) depends on which foot each cleat is on. At least that is the case with the candies I just bought - one cleat has two circles, I think putting that on the left foot = 15? Anyway I tried the 20 angle (I was very used to CB, having rode the mallets on 15 deg. for 2 years), but I found it extremely awkward to clip out with the new pedals at 20.

    I find that CBs release consistently when you need to jump off (or get thrown off!) down a pitch, but the problem is when I am climbing something technical and I want to go real slow to set up for a section - if I mess up and stall out, I need something that will let me get my foot out real quick. The 15 angle seems fine for this, the 20 does not.

    I rode Keystone last weekend on the candies set at 15. They did well most of the day, but on one occasion both feet came out of the pedals on cowboy up, going over those whoop-de-doos at the top. First I switched to the 20 degrees and discovered the clip-out problem. Then I realized that if I removed the shims that go uder the cleats, they firm up noticeably. So I did that and went back to 15, and now they feel like my mallets did, which is about right. Odd, because with the Mallets, I always used the shims. Maybe my shoes are a little more worn than they were, or maybe the bigger mallet platform affected the grip. I am guessing shoe choice might have a considerable impact on how firmly these pedals stay on your foot.

    I'm still not 100% sold on the crank bros, but I am sticking with them for at least this go-around. My Mallet Ms took a beating for 2 years until finally I broke one of the bars on a rock, my own fault. But they were very heavy. The Candies are much lighter, and I got them for $50, but they have less cage protection. My previous Shimano 959s felt great, but they broke also, and they were much heavier than the Candies, though I liked the fact that you could adjust them. The new Smarties look like a good deal for $60 msrp. Some of the ATACs have gotten good reviews, I will probably keep my eyes open for a good deal on those next time. But for now it's Candies at 15 degrees, no shim, hopefully that turns out to be sufficient.

  18. #18
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat_weasel
    looks like Times have a lot of fans around here. I'm surprised to hear about people's eggbeaters breaking...up until I started this thread I've never even heard of a bent spindle on Eggbeaters.
    Another Time fan here...

    Some time ago a guy at my favorite LBS showed me a small plastic tray full of damaged Eggbeater bearings. He said that it did not take an impact to break them; riding is enough. Many seem to do OK with Eggbeaters. Not sure if some models are stronger than others.

  19. #19
    Oh, So Interesting!
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    Why would you buy a pedal that requires new cleats all the time? Brass? WTF!!?? Why would they possibly do that except so they can sell more cleats? I spend enough on my bike as it is. I ran 424s, they broke after A LOT of abuse, now running 647s. They have always been consistant, and most people I talked to that used CB, Time and Spd prefer spd. Just rode today with a new egg user, we were riding rocky stuff, they come off due to pedal strike, not adjustable, and he had a hard time getting out. Guess they need to break in? Whatever, I'll stick with spd.
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  20. #20
    29er Geek
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113
    Why would you buy a pedal that requires new cleats all the time? Brass? WTF!!?? Why would they possibly do that except so they can sell more cleats? I spend enough on my bike as it is. I ran 424s, they broke after A LOT of abuse, now running 647s. They have always been consistant, and most people I talked to that used CB, Time and Spd prefer spd. Just rode today with a new egg user, we were riding rocky stuff, they come off due to pedal strike, not adjustable, and he had a hard time getting out. Guess they need to break in? Whatever, I'll stick with spd.
    why would one buy a pedal that flounders when encountering mud? I ride always rode SPDs, but find that in newengland the Eggs make life easier.

  21. #21
    Dawgwalker
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    I went to Eggbeaters because of the problems I had clipping in with SPD and they are my favorite pedal. Know that there is a right and left cleat with different float and release points. The one used left or right is an individual preference. You can also used two sets of cleats to get the same release on both sides.

  22. #22
    Get your freak on!
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    I have had numerous sets of egg beaters and have experience with Mallets and Candies. Aswell as the older SPD's (424's?).

    The problem with the fast wearing cleats has now been fixed, it requires spending the extra $5 for the 'premium' version of the cleat that is made of a harder brass.

    Like everyone esle has said, the float, performance in mud, ease of clipping are all great aspects of the eggies.

    The downsides to the egg beaters is the ejected release if the bottom of the pedal is hit. This can be annoying, although very rarely happens and has once actually saved me from having a crash as i got stalled up on a ledge.

    As some people have noted above, by removing/adding shims the egg beaters go from extremely 'wiggly' to a nice solid feeling pedal. Sadly this is true, the egg beater relys of the sole of the shoe to give a good feel to it. I have experienced shoes with low profile grip (answers) and the pedal feels crazy loose. Whereas Shimano racing shoes have that solid feeling as the grip is at just the right level to add stability but not affect the clipping action. If your shoes are too low, I reccomend you try something like shoe goo to build up the area and give it a try... you may find that the eggs are alot more enjoyable to ride.

    The shimano pedals I had werre awesome and never gave any troubles except for in mud. They were not as easy to clip in/out of as egg beaters and the float in them was not as smooth feeling.


  23. #23
    never ender
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    I'm not sure I get the shim thing. my beaters didn't come with shims. And I had to cut away the tread on my shoes (Specialized) to get them to release properly.

    The premium cleats sound promising, but I think my main problem is that my Eggbeaters are just plain old. There's a bit of play between the spindle and the pedal body, which according to Crank Bros is a problem with all the first-run beaters. It isn't immediately noticeable while riding, but it's worse on the left pedal and I notice that I have more trouble clipping out on that pedal.

    Anyway the eggbeaters are starting to grow on me again. The weird unclipping action took a while to get used to after Spds, but so far it hasn't really been a problem. I'll probably wind up hanging onto them through the wet season since I know they're reliable and buying something new next year.

  24. #24
    Dawgwalker
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    Not Shims

    Not really talking shims but that the left and right cleats are designed with different release points I guess because riders tend to clipout more often on one side. I clip from the non-drive side more often. I set the drive side with the cleat that has a greater travel to disengage.

  25. #25
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    Here is a recent thread on the Turner forum with some nicely detailed experiences, as well as input from Dave Turner.

    I went with the Time Atac Alium and love them only two rides in. Immediate was how much better control I had and how better connected I felt, which boosted confidence by a large margin.

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