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  1. #1
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    Should I fix up the old weasel?

    I have an old foes weasel ( I believe it's a 99) needs a new fork, and pretty much the entire drive train. The frame is in great shape, but is it worth dumping the money into? Would a new bike outperform it majorly?
    I don't really have much more than 1000 dollars to put into biking right now.

  2. #2
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    Could be pricey $$$$

    Depending on how the parts are it could be a lot of $$$.

  3. #3
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    Its not like you'd lose the upgraded parts if you change frames. So I say upgrade the frame and then when you get some more money, put those parts on the new frame.

  4. #4
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    Well, I want a decent bike, so I would want to get a good fork. I need a new chainring, chain guide, cassette, chain and I really want to get some disc brakes. Is that possible to get those components for under $1000 and still have a quality bike?

  5. #5
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    I'd just get a new bike. Probably would be cheaper.

  6. #6
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    Pictures? I'd say upgrade if for no other reason than its a freaking Foes Weasel. That's classic and awesome! I wish I had one. How does it ride? If the frame rides half decently, then buy some parts online and get it rolling. Online retailer or checking out the Buy & Sells will let you get some pretty darn good parts on that frame for 1000. Then have fun until you have some more expendable income. You will hopefully have a better idea of what you want by then and if you feel a new frame would benefit you, you can do it then.
    22 Pride

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammysmc
    Its not like you'd lose the upgraded parts if you change frames. So I say upgrade the frame and then when you get some more money, put those parts on the new frame.
    F'reals, yo. If you only have a grand to spend, then put that money into components that you know you'll still have down the road when you can afford a better frame. Better than scraping around for closeout deals on a whole new bike.

  8. #8
    Dirt Rag Extraordinaire
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    i always wanted a weasel (tube version, sexier than the monocoque LTS), it's one of the most classic bikes of all time.

    my friend had a similar problem. his work mate wanted to sell him a pristine weasel frame for $400. with another two grand for parts and he'd have a classic dually... but would it be worth it?

    i told him no, forget it. look, the fact is you can spend as much as you like on an old, (sadly) long out-dated frame like the weasel but at the end of the day it's not going to ride like a new bike. the weasel's ten years old now, and mtb has evolved so rapidly there's really no comparison between then and now, particularly in terms of what you actually get for the money. todays bike have ten generations of manufacturing/fabrication, suspension system, and geometry tweaking over the weasel, and i dare say would be far superior to the weasel in almost every way. i mean, the weasel was an XC bike fer chrissakes...

    if you want to cruise around town, visit your mtb buddies and have them say, "wow, look at that!" then build the weasel. if you actually want the bike for XC/AM riding, i probably wouldn't bother.
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

  9. #9
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    My Uber-V is 10 years older than my Rush, but with an updated drivetrain and fork/shock combo it's still a quality ride. I wouldn't count it out just because it's old.
    '06 Cannondale Rush 1000 4" travel 27lbs
    '04 Cannondale F600 SOBE -STOLEN!
    '96 Cannondale Uber-V 6" travel 30lbs

  10. #10
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    can you mount disc brakes on the weasel? if not get some thing else, you can easily find a used bike for a grand.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joelsman
    can you mount disc brakes on the weasel? if not get some thing else, you can easily find a used bike for a grand.
    +1
    I am all for nostalgia, but I think you may run into more compatibility issues than it is worth. Items like v-brake only frames, non-standard disc mounts, 1in or 1-1/4in steerer tubes, etc... If you can find all the parts to get it running again I would imagine it will be very frenkenbike and not ride as well as if you had just bit the bullit and gotten a nicer used bike.

    My current bike is a used heckler that I picked up for about $1k. I swapped and sold some parts, got some others but only put another couple hundred into making it my own. It is fully capable of riding anything I want and fully compatible with todays modern parts.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  12. #12
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    Yeah, I got good use out of the bike. I bought the full bike 5 years ago for $250 ( I thought that was a really good deal). at the time the fork still had plenty of life in it, and the drive train was in good shape too. Now it's in dire need of some new parts, and I need something to get me out on the trails this year.

    You guys probably aren't familiar with Drummer Hill Up here in Keene NH, but it's a pretty hot area for downhill riding. I am not into huge drops, but I want something that can handle at least 4 feet. I'm a pretty big guy (6'4" 180lbs) The weasel's frame held up well, but everything else needs an overhaul. I was thinking the heckler would be a pretty good choice... What's your opinion?

    Quote Originally Posted by joelsman
    can you mount disc brakes on the weasel? if not get some thing else, you can easily find a used bike for a grand.

    There aren't any disc brake mounts on the rear arm.

  13. #13
    Dirt Rag Extraordinaire
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    try get a new heckler

    i used to ride a heckler, now i ride a foes fxr 2:1. the pure sickness of the ol' weasel sold me on single pivot bikes from the very beginning. imho four bar linkage bikes are too much maintanence, 'specially if you're a big guy. i'd like to try an ellsworth or turner etc, with their fully active suspension systems and small bump compliance, but don't wanna have any on-going reliability issues. spare parts for these exotic machines are virtually impossible to find and ridiculously expensive in australia. and the bike shops seriously question why us poor riders buy online, often for a fraction of the retail...

    the heckler's a rad bike, you can't go wrong.

    that said, the previous model of the heckler, the model you'll most likely find cheap on ebay or the like, has a couple of not insignificant issues you should be aware of.

    main pivot design: the underside of the swingarm is attached to the pivot shaft via sealed bearings, held together with two small cups and four small allen bolts. as the main pivot point supporting the bike, and you, it is subject to significant forces, prone to excessive flex, and therefore must be regarded as somewhat under-engineered. it's a bit of a weak spot in what is otherwise a bomb-proof design.

    heckler shock mounts: the shock is mounted via small bolts and relatively thin plates, none of which are particularly reinforced. compare the front triangle shock mount of the nomad with the old heckler. over time, minor flex in the main pivot can result in the frame's shock mount bolt holes being rounded-out. the rear shock attachment to the swingarm appears most susceptible. even half a millimeter damage to the frame at this critical point becomes quite noticable and is very annoying. the quick fix is to tighten the sh!t out of the mounting assembly, but the damage is already done. this is a very common heckler problem, and should definately be investigated/inquired about before any second-hand purchase.

    look, to be honest you don't really notice the lateral flex prior to damaging the frame, but it is there. in fact, i reckon this potentially exaserbates the frame damage issue frequently described 'cause you're lulled into a false sense of security where you may not regularly inspect the pivot hardware for wear/tightness. after only a dozen or so rides it may already be too late.

    compare this to the agricultural design of foes bikes, with their custom, oversized hydroformed tubes, phat pivots, and in the case of the fxr, machined linkages directly re-inforcing the shock mounts, significantly releaving the frame of lateral flex and associated frame/pivot/assemblidge stress. after years of hammering my sloppy old 04 heckler the 06 foes fxr 2:1 made me realize just how stiff and tight a single pivot bike should be. foes simply picked up where santa cruz left off. that's cool, it's fun to see the constant design evolution of mtb, which of course ultimately benefits riders. you'll note the heckler pivot issue has been addressed with the new model, where they've adopted the stronger and more durable bullit-type pivot design.

    i'm sure you've contemplated the bullit, being a single pivot kinda guy. i've owned a bullit and it's a great DH bike, but it ain't no all-day trailbike. i'm sure a few bullit fanatics will hammer me, but at the end of the day no-one who's had both bikes would seriously try to deny the heckler's overall superiority in terms of versatility as an awesome XC/AM ride and more than capable DH rig. you could go light with the bullit, but as i had it with triple clamps (macin' 02 monster t's from ebay.uk) and saint cranks, it was a real pig tackling steep sections of a climb. it's long wheel base and low-slung feel does it no favours in this dept either.

    the all-purpose design attributes inherent throughout the heckler's epic, yet relatively subtle evolution lends the current generation a perfectly neutral and uber comfortable riding position. the heckler's a far superior climber while being a zippy, agile descender which remains super predictable and equally stable in absorbing big hits as it's big bro the bullit. in more than four years i never ate it hardcore once on the heckler.
    Last edited by m0ngy; 04-04-2009 at 09:03 PM.
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

  14. #14
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    heckler is a good choice.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the info m0ngy, great stuff! I do have alot more research ahead of me. I wonder what I will do with the weasel if I do get a new bike?
    That bike really did get me into riding, I've had so much fun with it... Maybe someday I will refurbish it and bring it back to it's original glory.

  16. #16
    Dirt Rag Extraordinaire
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    man, keep the weasel. where're you gonna find another one? if you sell it, even for a good price, you'll end up regretting it. wish i had a weasel to cruise around on.

    actually, i take back what i said bout rebuilding your weasel... it's a classic, so far ahead of its time it probably still outperforms the majority of newfangled, here-today-gone-tomorrow suspension designs out their today. i mean, just look at that swingarm... pure beef!

    if i had a weasel i'd build it up out of the very best retro parts of the period. lego block style cnc paul rear deraileur, orange bombers, ac cranks (though they had a rep for snapping with dire consequences), maybe XTR m952 cranks instead, syncros seat/stem, oldschool phat azonic bars seriously cut down but with ridiculous rise (that was a dangerous fad), i'm sure you get the picture. how cool would that be? i reckon you could find all that sh!t pretty cheap on ebay.

    not these paul deraileurs though, they're purely collectors items going for around US$400 on ebay. sweet trinkets to hang off your bike though.



    here's my girlfriend with my oldschool heckler... WISH!!


    Last edited by m0ngy; 04-06-2009 at 04:09 AM.
    "You go up the hill, you go down the hill."

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