Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ScottParsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    120

    Shimano A530 pedals with traction pins

    I gave up on clipless pedals about five or six years ago and completely swore them off. Never again was I going to think about clipping in or more importantly, clipping out. I was always clipping out. I'm a big p***y when it comes to riding technical sections with my feet hopelessly bound to my pedals mechanically. I don't know why but I could never get over it. It was a thorn in my side on all but the most buttery trails for over a decade. I said f**k it. I was over clipless pedals.

    I began my love affair with a pair of Wellgo MG-1 flat pedals. This was the best decision I ever made. Gone was that little voice in the back of my head telling me to clip out over those gnarly rocks on my weekly night ride. I was free. Life on the bike was rad. I could focus on the task at hand which was shredding descents. Me and my Vans. Old friends, reunited. Just like the old days.

    The good times never last though. I recently got a new bike and found myself riding much, much more than I ever had before. The long climbs up to my favorite trails were becoming a burden. Wearing floppy ass Vans or a pair of Converse just wasn't going to cut it any longer. I needed to clip back in and I knew it.

    A few years ago this hippy rolled into the shop on a touring bike and his pedals quickly got my attention. They were SPD on one side and flat on the other. Shimano had been making pedals with this concept for quite some time but these were different. They weren't totally stupid looking. They actually had a decent size platform with a really nice shape. These pedals were the Shimano PD-A530. The only drawback was that they didn't have much in the way of traction on the flat side. Just some smooth bumps around the sides. I immediately pictured them with traction pins.

    I knew it was finally time for me to order a set of these and modify them with set screws for traction. With my new pedals in hand, I hit up my favorite hardware store and bought two sizes of set screws and the corresponding tap I would need.

    I chose to use #6-32 set screws. For the front and rear pins I used 3/8" which were just slightly longer than the 5/16" screws used for the pins on the sides. After a couple rides I decided to add a pin on the center line, right above the axle. This pin would need to be super short so that it would not interfere with the movement of the axle itself. I used the Dremel tool to shave the pin down to about half the size. A bench top drill press was used to keep the holes true and the depth consistent. I would not have tried to do this project without the drill press. I might have destroyed a perfectly good set of pedals had I used a hand drill. As for the tapping, these are blind holes and they do not go all the way through the material. I needed to use the Dremel tool to cut most but not all of the tapered end off of the tap. This created more of a plug tap and worked perfectly. All the hardware was secured with blue Loctite.

    Coupled with a pair of Shimano M-162 shoes these modified pedals have exceeded my expectations. Clipped in climbing is great of course. The modern Shimano SPD mechanism is golden. When the trail points down, a quick flip of the pedals and I'm back to my same old tricks over snotty roots, slimy rocks and the occasional jump. Best of both worlds. A dream come true.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shimano A530 pedals with traction pins-1.jpg  

    Shimano A530 pedals with traction pins-2.jpg  

    Shimano A530 pedals with traction pins-3.jpg  


  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    445
    I've been contemplating doing the same on my new A530 pedals. Hadn't considered using the socket head set screws but that does sound like a good solution.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    That's a brilliant idea you have there. Very cool

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    205
    Nice job. I feel the same way about clipless, only I haven't decided that I need the clips for climbing...yet.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ScottParsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    120
    I've seen some similar attempts at making this work and the main complaint would be that the pedal might be on the wrong side when you need it. I don't seem to have this problem. Its as though years and years of using toe clips (1980's) has trained my feet to just work it out.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jason_recliner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    46
    Great work and an excellent post. Thanks for sharing.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    219
    Awesome. I have been thinking of doing the exact same thing. I have a couple of questions for you:

    On the platform side, how do these compare to other dedicated platforms with pins you have used? Would they work good with 5.10s?

    I know Shimano calls these road or commuter pedals. Will these hold up to downhill and drops and things?

    Last question: What if you took another shimano platform pedal like the m647, and just unscrewed the "clip" mechanism from one side and made it a one sided pedal?

    Nice thread!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    219

    Bit the bullet

    I ordered up a pair of the Shimano a530's today from Nashbar. Got them for $47, which I felt was a great deal. I am going to install pins also. I plan on drilling my holes all the way though the pedals and installing my hex head set screws from the bottom. When I am done I will post up a review.

    Hopefully the construction is strong enough for mountain biking even though it is considered a "road" pedal.

    Now I just have to find some good shoes. I want grippy rubber, but still some efficiency. I have looked at 5.10's but may just go with some Shimano shoes.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ScottParsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    120
    Quote Originally Posted by Venturewest View Post
    Awesome. I have been thinking of doing the exact same thing. I have a couple of questions for you:

    On the platform side, how do these compare to other dedicated platforms with pins you have used? Would they work good with 5.10s?

    I know Shimano calls these road or commuter pedals. Will these hold up to downhill and drops and things?

    Last question: What if you took another shimano platform pedal like the m647, and just unscrewed the "clip" mechanism from one side and made it a one sided pedal?

    Nice thread!
    So far so good with the pedals. I'm a little bit disappointed in the shoe/pedal interface. And what I mean by that is; I've been using the M164 shoe with these pedals and the sole of the shoes are proving a bit too narrow. Also, the sole, although not as hard of rubber as most xc shoes, is still harder than I'd like and my feet tend to "bounce" around a bit. That is something I was not expecting. I've ridden with these pedals around the neighborhood with Converse shoes and it was awesome. Just like a platform with Vans or whatever. Therefore I would assume that a pair of 510 or similar shoe would work very, very well. I will still rock the Shimano shoes for long rides and in summertime I'm sure.

    Don't get me wrong. I'm really splitting hairs here. These pedals are working exactly as I'd hoped but there are undoubtedly a "compromise".

    As far as durability goes, only time will tell and I'm not doing any serious DH or big drops but so far so good and I have little doubt that they will last for a very long time.

    Good luck with your set. I'd love to see what you come up with.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •