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  1. #1
    Paper or plastic?
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    Rode a Turner Spot today (vs. Motolite)

    I tried a buddy 5 Spot today. A medium 06 with a DHX air, Vanilla fork, all kinds of light Shimano bling, Gravity Dropper, and big tires (2.4 enduro front and 2.35 Nevegal rear). Boy, was I impressed. That thing was plush! It handled the bumps really well (tires certainly helped quite a bit), jumped very nicely (all 5" off the ground that I was able to muster ) and ate up the rocks.

    The geometry of the cockpit was really spot on and did not take any time getting used to. The part that impressed me the most was the climbing ability of the bike (again the tires helped). I'm used to dialing my Talas down on steep climbs on my Motolite, whereas on the Spot I was able to clear some nice techy steep climbs by simply moving my butt forward. While a Talas fork would have been nice, I was able to do without it. For a sit and spin guy like me, the bike is damn near perfect.

    Compared to my Motolite, the bike was defnitely slower (I also use smaller tubeless tires) and it was not as efficient to stand up and mash. If I had to compare, I'd say that the Motolite is quicker and the Spot is plusher (we're talking subtle nuances here, and I ride a small Motolite with a 1.5" stroke RP23) and seems a better climber on the techy stuff.

    As a disclaimer, this is just a very average rider's opinion.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  2. #2
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    cool "short review", zorg!

    thanks!

  3. #3
    not so super...
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    Sounds about right to me
    Nothing to see here.

  4. #4
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    Nice mini-review, zorg! The Spot is a great bike. My buddy has a 5 spot with a Pushed RP3 that I was able to take for a spin and the plushness was just unbelievable. I found it to pedal very well and climb tech stuff with ease. I felt at home on the bike....

  5. #5
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    Nice Review

    One note on your review.... Tires make an enormous difference to the ride and feel of a bike. If you have a chance, try the Spot with the same (or similar) tires that you use on your Moto Lite. I've owned a Spot for a few years. When I put smaller tires on it, it feels like a completely different bike.... quicker... and a better climber.

    I still prefer the grip and cush that I get from bigger tires, but do yourself a favor and try the Spot with the smaller tires before you make up your mind about the two.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    Nice Review

    One note on your review.... Tires make an enormous difference to the ride and feel of a bike. If you have a chance, try the Spot with the same (or similar) tires that you use on your Moto Lite. I've owned a Spot for a few years. When I put smaller tires on it, it feels like a completely different bike.... quicker... and a better climber.

    I still prefer the grip and cush that I get from bigger tires, but do yourself a favor and try the Spot with the smaller tires before you make up your mind about the two.
    That's a great point. Actually, during the summer, I use a Weiwolf 2.55LT, so I'm somewhat used to a big balloony front tire. The rear would definitely need to be swapped to my regular Nevegal to have a more meaningful comparison though.

    Sorry to everyone for the mini review. I'm not one to analyze every detail of the bike. All I know is that I got on it, it felt good and the cockpit worked for me. Plus, it's hard over 2 hours to figure out every little nuance.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  7. #7
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    I'l second what Blue Shorts said (it looks like you tried his bike). I seen your Motolite setup (SB8 2.1) and have ridden Endure/Nevegal tires myself.

    Nevegals one of the slowest tires with Enduro only being one of those tires that managed to get slower than Nevegals. Even while using Enduro on the front I noticed it's slowing down bike quite a lot. SB8 on another hand is one of the fastest tires that still has a grip

    On the free-rolling downhill test I did with 2 setups I got following (no cranking just gravity rolling)
    Enduro/Nev combo - 24mph at the buttom
    Resolution/SB8 combo - 32mph

    Also Vanilla fork is quite heavy.
    I used to run tubes like you are, but then I got thorn in my wheel.

  8. #8
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    Yup. My impresion too.
    Motolite is quicker and the Spot is plusher and seems a better climber on the techy stuff.

    The new Spot has more travel 5.5 vs 5.0 for the MotoLite.

    With very rare exception, suspension geometry with snappier acceleration reaction breaks traction easier.

  9. #9
    Paper or plastic?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalk
    I'l second what Blue Shorts said (it looks like you tried his bike). I seen your Motolite setup (SB8 2.1) and have ridden Endure/Nevegal tires myself.

    Nevegals one of the slowest tires with Enduro only being one of those tires that managed to get slower than Nevegals. Even while using Enduro on the front I noticed it's slowing down bike quite a lot. SB8 on another hand is one of the fastest tires that still has a grip

    On the free-rolling downhill test I did with 2 setups I got following (no cranking just gravity rolling)
    Enduro/Nev combo - 24mph at the buttom
    Resolution/SB8 combo - 32mph

    Also Vanilla fork is quite heavy.
    The SB8 is the summer tire, which I swapped right after our ride for a Nevegal 2.1. I used J's bike (thanks J), and he runs tubes in his tires, whereas I run mine all tubeless. I managed to use all the travel of the DHX-air at Skeggs, even with the big Nevie.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  10. #10
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    Cool.

    Where are the photos ?~?

  11. #11
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    Indeed it is a rather slow bike

    Your review is just about right on with my experience. The Spot is plush and it is a good technical climber: at crawling speeds and in steps, roots and rocks it works well. On the other end when compared to other bikes, it is not as quick and it suffers uphill in less technical terrain.

    I sold my 5-spot last year mostly because I was disappointed by its performance both uphill and anywhere when some quick accelleration was required. I had a Push Rp3 on it that helped when set in the the stiffest position but not enough. In the plush position the Push Rp3 was a pleasure to fool around and try some nutty uphill stuff, but you simply could not use it for efficient extended trail riding. I used 2.1 to 2.25 tires in the back.

  12. #12
    FM
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    Both fine bikes. Ultimately I think the motolite compares more directly to the Turner Flux (which is lighter). The motolite is kind of a weird combo, it's 5" and has the tubing which can take the abuse, yet the geometry, suspension feel and tire clearance are more XC-oriented.

    Motolite is awesome for epic XC, enduro's or racing, as well as general trail riding. I think it's best built up with a 130mm fork, air shock and light parts. I loved the snappy climbing and durability of my motolite, and I liked the TT/ST lengths. I wish the head angle was 1-2 degrees slacker.

    The 5-spot is a better descender, has more tire clearance, and lower/slacker geometry. You can push the build well up into the mid 30lb range, and the frame will still not be the limiting factor. If you ride everything but live for the downhills, the 5-spot rules. Turner customer service is also awesome.

  13. #13
    Paper or plastic?
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    Both fine bikes. Ultimately I think the motolite compares more directly to the Turner Flux (which is lighter). The motolite is kind of a weird combo, it's 5" and has the tubing which can take the abuse, yet the geometry, suspension feel and tire clearance are more XC-oriented.

    Motolite is awesome for epic XC, enduro's or racing, as well as general trail riding. I think it's best built up with a 130mm fork, air shock and light parts. I loved the snappy climbing and durability of my motolite, and I liked the TT/ST lengths. I wish the head angle was 1-2 degrees slacker.

    The 5-spot is a better descender, has more tire clearance, and lower/slacker geometry. You can push the build well up into the mid 30lb range, and the frame will still not be the limiting factor. If you ride everything but live for the downhills, the 5-spot rules. Turner customer service is also awesome.
    And that's why I plan on keeping the Motolite as a 4" light bike for those climbing/racing days. The Spot would still be built with air shocks but will definitely be for the technical riding days.
    Faster is not always better, but it's always more fun

  14. #14
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    The 2006 and older Spots would feel a bit sluggish sometimes when compared to a more firmly suspended bike. That and the low BB were why I never bought one. That said, I have ridden a PUSH tuned (with rockers) and it was way more nimble than the stock one so my initial plan was to get a 2006 and mod it with PUSH rockers and a PUSH tune. But then the 2007 came out and I was given an opportunity to cut past the waiting line.

    The 2007 Spot is a bit snappier and more nimble but has not lost any technical abilities and has saved me a couple of times. I think the firmer ML still pedals a bit quicker than the 2007 Spot but I only truly need help in the really steep or really rocky climbs, where the Spot excels. I ride with guys on ASRs too so it isn't like I'll have the most efficient bike in the group- ever. I'm still thinking of having my Pike and RP23 tuned by PUSH but it's an expensive experiment.

    I certainly would not mind having a 26 lb Moto to complement my 30 lb Spot. You would hear no complaints from me- ever

    One odd thing I have noticed- the HL Spots were less sensitive to rear shock air pressure. It seems to me that the post-HL Spots have a smaller sweet spot or less of a range where they work the best. I have it dialed in now but it takes more work and time- it's either too firm or too plush and almost sluggish. Once you get in that 5-6 psi range, it rides amazingly well and you don't think about the shock at all. The older HL Spot seemed to work well in more than double the psi range. I could be at 160 or 170 and it would still be in the sweet spot- just a tiny bit firmer or plusher. The change in psi results in a bigger feel difference now. It's just an observation I wanted to share in case anyone feels the same way.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    ....

    The 5-spot is a better descender, has more tire clearance, and lower/slacker geometry. You can push the build well up into the mid 30lb range, and the frame will still not be the limiting factor. ......

    mmm.... why is Turner fretting over a 36 on a Spot then (the headtube I believe) ?~?

  16. #16
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    mmm.... why is Turner fretting over a 36 on a Spot then (the headtube I believe) ?~?
    purpose...same reason as the ML can't use a fork over 145mm.... the riding "that comes with the fork" is not what it's designed to do... of course..a lot of us use big forks for more comfort at speed...not hucks... but it is easy to see why there are limits on these things...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by crisillo
    purpose...same reason as the ML can't use a fork over 145mm.... the riding "that comes with the fork" is not what it's designed to do... of course..a lot of use use big forks for more comfort at speed...not hucks... but it is easy to see why there are limits on these things...
    geez, you got wiser with moderation

  18. #18
    Nightriding rules SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    geez, you got wiser with moderation

  19. #19
    "El Whatever"
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    Nice review, Zorg!!
    Check my Site

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    Nice review, Zorg!!
    hey you got replaced by Rapid Edward on the Titi forum !~!

    Great to see you taking care of Giant

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    mmm.... why is Turner fretting over a 36 on a Spot then (the headtube I believe) ?~?

    Yeah, definitely an intended use thing, in my opinion. I do see a few with 36s but if those riders are running them at 160 all the time, they should probably be on a RFX. Sometimes I'm tempted to put on a 36 for those gnarly descents where I get closer to praying/cursing real fast but maybe I'll just avoid them altogether or bail on a few drops

    I'm getting too old to start eyeing 3'-4' drops and I'll prob be safer on an all-carbon XC machine with 30mm of spacers on a QR fork and Arch wheels.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Yeah, definitely an intended use thing, in my opinion. I do see a few with 36s but if those riders are running them at 160 all the time, they should probably be on a RFX. Sometimes I'm tempted to put on a 36 for those gnarly descents where I get closer to praying/cursing real fast but maybe I'll just avoid them altogether or bail on a few drops

    I'm getting too old to start eyeing 3'-4' drops and I'll prob be safer on an all-carbon XC machine with 30mm of spacers on a QR fork and Arch wheels.

    I'm putting a 36 on an Endorphin

    I'm getting too old to ride an All Carbon Mountain XC machine with a QR flexy fork (in other words my skills are decreasing and I need a big stiff fork to compensate ).

  23. #23
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    I am considering taking another approach. I may need to be on a bike that will collapse on a drop over two feet. It also needs to flex three inches to either side when taking ahard turn. That way, the flex and the collapse factor will make me ride safe and stick to 12" drops only.

    By the way, that Endorphin is sweet and deserves the 36, knowing how tough that frame is to begin with. Knolly is another company that refines a solid design and build some fantastic bikes instead of playing around with fancy gibberish. However, I hear it is a very active design as well. You did very well in choosing that bike

  24. #24
    FM
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    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    mmm.... why is Turner fretting over a 36 on a Spot then (the headtube I believe) ?~?
    I think one distinction is the 5-spot feels pretty good with a fox 36 (or similar) fork, while the motolite geometry gets kinda whacked out.

    It's not really a good area of comparison, since neither bike was really designed to run 160mm forks

    But I think the difference is in the BB height and head angle. The 5-spot has a low BB, slap a 160mm fork on there and the bike becomes slack, but not too tall. The motolite has a taller BB and steeper angles, with a big fork it just ended up feeling tippy and nervous to me. I drink alot of coffee, that combined with the motolite and a tall fork, lets just say I rode off trail a few times.

  25. #25
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    The wheelbase may also be longer that the ML. I haven't looked into the difference but I would think there is at least an inch or 1.5" longer wheelbase on the Spot. Of course, someone will probably come by and prove me wrong in a minute.

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