Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 55
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199

    Rims for AM riding

    Hi guys. I'm currently using a Mavic XC717 Disc on my XC HT bike. Its a nice rim for tire sizes between 2.0" to 2.2". However im planning and saving up for a new FS bike, which would be an AM rig.

    May i know what rims can i use for AM use? Im planning to use 2.35" tires. Was kinda aiming at Mavic, DT and Syncros. Hope to hear from you guys.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hitek79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,302
    the Mavic 819's seem to be one of the most popular. That's what I'll be using when I upgrade mine.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    285
    Mavic 819's I weight 180 ride aggressively,durable,lite.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by readingracing
    Mavic 819's I weight 180 ride aggressively,durable,lite.
    I see. Can it fit 2.35" tires? Was planning to use Maxxis High Rollers 26 x 2.35". I won't go tubeless tho, thats the advice given by my local mates. Haha

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    108
    I ran a WTB Prowler 2.5 without issues on my 819's. Tubeless is the way to go. I was running that tire at 28 psi over the entire season and never had a problem.

  6. #6
    MattSavage
    Reputation: mattsavage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,461
    I like the Mavic 321's with XT hubs... Solid, relatively light, super cheap... Build up your own, save some dough...
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  7. #7
    some know me as mongo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    679
    i have the mavic EN521 on mine and thus far love the things. they are pretty light and biuilt up great. also they are still true and round though i have not put too much of a beating on them. As for the whole tubeless thing that is still personal preference. personally i don't like tubeless because it is heavier (though maybe not for much longer) and it still has its fair share of problems. especially if you are a heavier person.

  8. #8
    Maaaaan
    Reputation: Ericmopar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    4,181
    I like Sun Rhynos and Single tracks.
    Other rims mentioned usually keep the weight below 600 grams.
    The rim weight is the most important thing to watch. Many wheelsets are light overall, but the rim weight is too high.
    It's better to have a heavier hub, with a lighter rim.
    Whatever you do, try to keep the rim weight between 500 and 600 grams. That is the best range, for a balance of strength to weight ratio.
    Also, make sure to have a rim, that is between 27 and 29mm in outside width.
    Some of the lighter "all mountian" rims, are too narrow. The narrow width is how they are keeping the weight down, while maintaining strength, but then the rim won't properly support the wider tires used in all mountain riding.
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nagatahawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,189
    I built up a xtr/ mavic 321 wheel set. the are annodized grey and match the hubs/ rotor/frame color! 560 grams and very strong.

    The 521s are lighter and probably just as strong.

    " This is the follow up, I rode sullivan canyon down from the top, the rims took every hit and felt really good. lots of squared off ruts, broken shale, ramps drops roots etc. although a lbs told me they were heavy, they realy felt great on the trail, an I hand no problems lofting the bike. "
    Last edited by nagatahawk; 03-09-2009 at 10:45 AM.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,386
    Mavic XM719 or 819 great really strong rim, 2.35's fit fine, I've just built some EX721 to take a bigger 2.5 tire, another good rim not to heavy,

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    217
    whadabout stans flow rims - love them

  12. #12
    cgrocho
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by mattsavage
    I like the Mavic 321's with XT hubs... Solid, relatively light, super cheap... Build up your own, save some dough...
    I really enjoy wheelbuilding and agree here, but I gotta say I haven't found much of a cost savings by buying all the components separately. And I really like the 819s too, I have pounded on mine with no issues whatsoever.

  13. #13
    not a paid spokesperson
    Reputation: sizzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by AScott_user
    I won't go tubeless tho, thats the advice given by my local mates. Haha
    ...I hope you are kidding.

  14. #14
    grade A procrastinator
    Reputation: ronoranina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    142
    another vote for 819 rims. very solid and pretty light too at 480 grams

    oh and definitely go tubeless if you can. once you factor in the weight of tubes to go along with non-tubeless tires it about equals the weight of only a tubeless tire.
    plus you have all of the benefits that a tubeless rim and tire brings to the table. i won't go back to tubes... ever!
    I don't have everything I want.

    But, I want everything I have.

  15. #15
    Maaaaan
    Reputation: Ericmopar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    4,181
    Quote Originally Posted by sizzo
    ...I hope you are kidding.
    Most of the riders around my area won't use tubeless anymore.
    They've had too much trouble trying to reseat them after field repairs.
    They've had cuts that are too big for the Stans to seal anyways. (if you're using Stans.)
    More than once, I've walked into a local shop that shall remain nameless, and they were struggling to seat a tubeless tire and rim.
    That was with compressed air available, and all the shop tools.
    If you're using something like Stan's, then it's quite difficult to boot a tire in the middle of nowhere.
    Because of these issues, you have to carry spare tubes anyways.

    The general opinion around here is, that tubeless is great when it works, but when it doesn't, it's a real pain in the ass that can leave you stranded.
    We have lots of sharp things around here in the desert, and too many people, end up having to run a tube in one or more their "tubeless" tires anyways. The reason for this, is that the cuts are too big for something like Stans to seal, so the tire gets a boot and a tube. Or just a tube.

    If you end up having to run a tube in a tubeless tire, the rolling resistance is actually higher than a normal tubed tire design.

    It's also cheaper to run a standard tubed setup. Some of us, can't afford the "latest and greatest" stuff anyways.
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar
    Most of the riders around my area won't use tubeless anymore.
    They've had too much trouble trying to reseat them after field repairs.
    They've had cuts that are too big for the Stans to seal anyways. (if you're using Stans.)
    More than once, I've walked into a local shop that shall remain nameless, and they were struggling to seat a tubeless tire and rim.
    That was with compressed air available, and all the shop tools.
    If you're using something like Stan's, then it's quite difficult to boot a tire in the middle of nowhere.
    Because of these issues, you have to carry spare tubes anyways.

    The general opinion around here is, that tubeless is great when it works, but when it doesn't, it's a real pain in the ass that can leave you stranded.
    We have lots of sharp things around here in the desert, and too many people, end up having to run a tube in one or more their "tubeless" tires anyways. The reason for this, is that the cuts are too big for something like Stans to seal, so the tire gets a boot and a tube. Or just a tube.

    If you end up having to run a tube in a tubeless tire, the rolling resistance is actually higher than a normal tubed tire design.

    It's also cheaper to run a standard tubed setup. Some of us, can't afford the "latest and greatest" stuff anyways.
    Exactly. Thats what my friend (a mechanic at a LBS) told me. Its great when it works, but it gonna be a pain in the ass when it fails. My friend especially highlighted the sealant problem. he said that proper maintenance is needed for them. If they dries up and sticks to the rim, theres a chance that you wont be able to use the rim again. I can't rmbr exactly what he said, but this is the general idea.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Thanks for the replies guys. Seems like the 819 is the choice to go. I've seen before a wheelset of 819s laced to XT hubs. A sick looking wheelset(its sick for me cause i cant afford for high end hubs since im a student ) Now i know how its rated by you guys, perhaps i shall go along with the 819.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,412
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.

  19. #19
    Made in Canada
    Reputation: tpm7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    415
    If you haven't decided yet, I'd definitely recommend Halo Freedom Discs if you're looking this route (they can be a PITA to find though, they're supposed to be the same as Syncros DS28 rims). They aren't the lightest rim out there, but they're very strong! However if you're looking for tubeless the Mavic's are probably better.
    STOLEN: '07 Banshee Viento - See Eastern Canada Forum for Pictures. If anyone sees it contact me ASAP!

  20. #20
    Wiz
    Wiz is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    305
    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.
    EXACTLY . Been running 819s w/Kings on my everything ride w/tubeless 2.3 Schwalbees for a while with great results. They ride AWESOME & I really dig the capabilities of lower air pressures. I have not had any problems once I figured em out a little. We have MANY tube flats from thorns here & so I run 3ozs of slime in = No Flats what-so-ever. As you can see in pic they are currently set up w/tubed wired beaded studs...a BlTCH to get on? YES. I carry a tube with this setup & I should have put slimed tubes in, but winter here is almost over & I can't wait to go back to tubeless. That said, my nephew ran Sun rims w/shim hubs w/2.5s. (2nd pic) They were less expensive, he hucks and they held up real well. I tossed in my burly (pic3) just for comparison, ex823s again tubeless w/Kings & sapine spokes...simply unbelievable w/2.5s but a little pricey & heavy from what you may want. As Pete said, if we can't convince you to go tubeless & you like Mavic go w/other options. I rode 321s for many years & on another ride I have em mounted w/Kings, nice set up but on long rides I carry at least 1 tube and a patch kit. Good luck there is a lot of great stuff out there!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.
    I see. But is using sealant a must in tubeless systems? If not, i might consider using tubeless.

  22. #22
    Wiz
    Wiz is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    305
    No, not a must. However, I truly would not worry about using sealant,,,it's a good thing . Whoever told you that sealant in a tubeless rim can dry out and possibly ruin your rim is WRONG imho.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Wiz
    No, not a must. However, I truly would not worry about using sealant,,,it's a good thing . Whoever told you that sealant in a tubeless rim can dry out and possibly ruin your rim is WRONG imho.
    Wow. I would like to try not using sealant. Then it would rly be like a vehicle's tubeless tire. I hate to use additional things. I prefer to keep it simple, just like the qoute K.I.S.S. Haha. Then can i run without sealant on low pressure? Will the tire come off?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    601
    You can clean the rims out with a stiff brush easy and no need to worry about the slime. Also I always carry a tube since if you cut a side wall on a tubeless you would have done the same on a tubed tire. If sealent wont seal a hole in the tire pop it off take out the valve and put in a tube till you get home and are able to fix it.

    Trail side maitence with tubeless can be a pain if you have to unseat a rim so it is easier to bring a tube and run tubes if you get a flat which will not happen often.

  25. #25
    Wiz
    Wiz is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    305

    ... and if we just ... I like things simple too

    I hear ya on keeping things simple & when I wanted to upgrade it took my (Superior mechanic) Bud many a beer to talk me into em...I had all the concerns you have expressed. That said, I never will regret my decision. Some old school guys (I'm old) have a million reasons why not to go tubeless & it's just my opinion that once set up they are simple because you hardly ever have to deal w/em & thats why I run sealant "Slime".

    You just pour 1/2 a 6oz bottle of the stuff into the tire once one bead is set on rim correctly, use your fingers or a lever to get the other bead in. Hit w/a compressor until they pop, back off air like you never thought possible & laugh. BTW: many threads on tubeless (debates really). Keep in mind, when the tubeless tires are new it's easier to use a compressor to get it to seat, but I have used a bigboy compressed air canister & sometimes a floorpump can work but may be a little drustrating until they get expanded a few times.

    I too thought it all was a big pain in the arss, until I ran them for over a year with No Leaks at Low, med & high air pressures. I had some issues because a valve stem in one was junk. In all fairness though, a cheap compressor or your LBS's makes life w/tubeless much less frustrating especially in the beginning. So, as you can see, it took me a little while to get the scene down, but when it came down to it as ro what my next build rims for my (new & unbelievable) FR whip would be, I without hesitation went with another tubeless setup..soo sweet. If I can get the dough up, I will take the CKs off the 321s on my HT & go w/a another non-ghetto tubeless setup. Another thing to keep in mind, like Pete said, when reviewing opinions make sure your not reading about ghetto rim strip setups, I hear of a lot of headaches, but they do work. It's real simple about real tubeless rims, no spoke holes, just a airtight rubberized valve and hooky sides, when something pukes or the valve leaks the "slime seals it & you just keep on riding, the only extra part I like to have on hand is a nice extra valve stem. Badly Torn sidewalls? Well, I don't know...if I'm alone, way out there I carry a tube anyway. If that doesn't work. I will walk or go the hypothermia route. Hope this helps, my man

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    184
    I'd like to chime in and give my vote to 819s and going tubeless. I made the switch a few months ago and I've been VERY happy. I'm running standard 2.35" Kenda Nevegal/Bluegroove tires (not UST). I had no problem getting them seated and sealed up, I put 2-3 scoops of Stans in each tire before inflating them the first time and they've been pretty trouble free since. I burped my front on a ride (too low pressure) and pumped it back up with a hand pump, I blew the tire off during a nightride when I missed a step-up in the trail and endo'd and I just reseated the tire with a CO2 cartridge no problem. I recently tore my rear tire up and mounted a Specialized Eskar 2Bliss tire with a floor pump no problems.

    Also, if you're concerned with weight and want a Tubeless ready tire, the Specialized 2Bliss are pretty light and have the UST standard bead and it sealed perfect. Only drawback is that it's a tad taller in profile than my Nevegal and rubbs on my seat tube under full compression (Intense 6.6).

    Long post, sorry, I vote 819s and tubeless!

    Oh, and I'm not the smoothest rider (as you can probably tell) and I weigh about 215 and haven't had any troubles yet with the 819s, they seem pretty durable.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by Bnorthro
    I'd like to chime in and give my vote to 819s and going tubeless. I made the switch a few months ago and I've been VERY happy. I'm running standard 2.35" Kenda Nevegal/Bluegroove tires (not UST). I had no problem getting them seated and sealed up, I put 2-3 scoops of Stans in each tire before inflating them the first time and they've been pretty trouble free since. I burped my front on a ride (too low pressure) and pumped it back up with a hand pump, I blew the tire off during a nightride when I missed a step-up in the trail and endo'd and I just reseated the tire with a CO2 cartridge no problem. I recently tore my rear tire up and mounted a Specialized Eskar 2Bliss tire with a floor pump no problems.

    Also, if you're concerned with weight and want a Tubeless ready tire, the Specialized 2Bliss are pretty light and have the UST standard bead and it sealed perfect. Only drawback is that it's a tad taller in profile than my Nevegal and rubbs on my seat tube under full compression (Intense 6.6).

    Long post, sorry, I vote 819s and tubeless!

    Oh, and I'm not the smoothest rider (as you can probably tell) and I weigh about 215 and haven't had any troubles yet with the 819s, they seem pretty durable.
    Wow. I'm rly tempted into going tubeless man. Perhaps the first time i use tubeless i will get my LBS to set it up for me, since im totally clueless abt how tubeless run. Then as time goes by i will slowly learn by myself. Thanks a many for your insight guys.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    911
    I haven't run too much with tubeless so no real comment there, but I will comment on some good experiences with AM type rims.

    I typically run two wheelsets for my bikes so I can swap out quickly and easily depending on what I am riding.

    For my XC/AM bike I am running Easton Havoc AM with more XC type tires as one set, then running Syncros DP25 on Hope Pro IIs with 2.35/2.4 tires. (135 x 10 rear and 20mm front)

    For my AM/FR bike I run Mavic 721 with dual ply tires for the shore riding and Whistler, For more AM type riding I run a EN521 with a Hope Pro II on the back, then use my Hope
    Pro II, Syncros DP25 from my XC bike (150 x 12 rear and 20mm front)

    When I had my XC/AM wheels build I wanted to try the Stans rims, but up here in Canada, they are bloody expensive compared to other rims. So I will stick with my Mavic, Easton and Syncros rims for now as they have yet to let me down.

  29. #29
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,078
    OP: Whoever got into your head about ust rims not being able to be used if the sealant dries and that ust is no good for the desert are (excuse my candor)...complete tards.

    If you ride in the desert than nothing will serve you better than UST tires, with UST wheels...and yes, use sealant.

    I've been riding in Phoenix for years on 819's and I have had exactly ONE flat tire on the trail. With tubes it was once a month. If you are talking about ghetto tubeless, then yes, that can be a pain in comparison to ust/ust set ups.

    Stop listening to your 'friends' and the 'bike shop guy' and do yourself a favor and get those 819's and some ust tires. Add some sealant, lower that pressure below 30psi for starters and rock on. Or......just get the 719's and some tubes if it makes you feel better.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    889
    Quote Originally Posted by AScott_user
    Wow. I would like to try not using sealant. Then it would rly be like a vehicle's tubeless tire. I hate to use additional things. I prefer to keep it simple, just like the qoute K.I.S.S. Haha. Then can i run without sealant on low pressure? Will the tire come off?
    I have 819s and did not use sealant at first. I can seat UST tires with a hand pump, no compressor. In the field just bring an emergency tube for if you get a big hole though I have never needed one. So far the only problem I have had is hitting something really hard in the process of crashing usually and knocking the seal loose on the tire then you just pump it back up as it is still seated outside the groove. Had that happen once at moab (soverign) both front and back and once during a particularly gnarly endo. You can put a bit of soapy water on the tire to help it seal if you dont have a compressor. I did have one panaracer super narrow tire I had a hard time seating, but that is it ever for difficulty.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: scottg07's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    293
    i really like my sun str8track wheelset (equalizer 31mm rims) they are the first wheelset to so far hold up to my abuse. think they are around 600g and much less expensive than mavic- i see no need for a 90 dollar rim (at least on my budget anyway)

  32. #32
    not a paid spokesperson
    Reputation: sizzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by sizzo
    ...I hope you are kidding
    because
    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.
    The 819 is just the tubeless version of the 719, and will cost you mucho $$$ for that reason.

    I live in Southern Arizona, we grow rocks not grass. W/o tubeless, I was running LC nevegals w/ mid-weight tubes @ 35-40psi on my hardtail and was washing out in the corners and STILL pinching out every ride. It was the ride that I suffered a massive snake bike on the front...and then rear...and had only brought one extra tube, that forced me to switch, and I won't go back. Been riding them since September and though I've had to add more sealant because of all the acupuncture my tires have endured, I have not flatted once on the trail. I even mounted up the DH cased tires I run on my Heckler ghetto-tubeless, have not had a flat since and can drop the pressure to really dig in on the gravelly chunder that plagues our corners here.

    Also for all the guys who say they won't use tubeless because you might get a flat on the trail... TAKE AN EXTRA TUBE!!!! Just carry a normal bicycle tube (you should be carrying one already), and if your tire goes flat, you just remove your getto-tubeless/rim strips/valve and throw in the tube, inflate just as you otherwise would and go home. While installing your tires tubeless is a PITA (getting the Stan's sealant worked around the bead until there is no more small leaks = , but I'm not using UST tires), IMHO it is however virtually (not completely) maintenance free after that, you adjust your tire pressure based upon traction needs, not fear of pinch flats, and if you do flat/blow out the sidewall/dent the rim so badly that the bead won't seat/run over an anti-armor landmine, you are in no worse a position than if that happened with tubes. Throw in a spare and ride home.

    That being said, if you live in an area where you don't have a problem with pinch flatting already, are just looking to "shave ounces", or if you are one of those obsessive-compulsive tire swappers (or even someone who just is still experimenting with which tire to run), tubeless is not for you. You won't notice the difference and will hate it when it comes to swapping out rubber. I hate swapping out rubber, but I hate flatting more so tubeless still puts a smile on my face.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Slyp Dawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    454
    don't have any personal experience with them, but I would look into a wheelset built with Sun Ringle MTX29 rims, or Spank Subrosas. both are around the same weight, and from what I've heard both are good rims. the rim cross-section of the Subrosa would likely make running them tubeless difficult, no matter what system you use. should be easy to see why once you see a pic of the rim cross-section. the MTX29s should be a bit easier to run tubeless, though, due the more normal cross-section
    Quote Originally Posted by teamdicky View Post
    My butthole would pucker and invert until I was inside-out before I got to the bottom.

  34. #34
    grade A procrastinator
    Reputation: ronoranina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    142
    The 819 rim will stand up to anything AM you can throw at them. I have mine laced up to Hadley hubs and they have been rock solid. They are more expensive than many rims but you get what you pay for in my opinion.

    I don't use sealant either as someone above said. Never had a burp, nothin. UST tires are difficult to get on by hand though. But if you think about it, they should be right? I mean the fit should be tight. That's why the system works well. Only thing that is a bit of a hassle is if you leave the bike sitting for a week or so they will loose a few PSI - not really a biggie though.
    I don't have everything I want.

    But, I want everything I have.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mrgto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    434
    I dont buy the whole you get what you pay for. I have a pare of hand built (by myself) Sun SOS rims to a Sette 20mm front hub and the shimano deore rear hub. i would love to upgrade to a better rear hub but the hub hasent died yet. This wheel set has been great. If you read the reviews of these rims they are supose to suck, but i have beat the he[[ out of them and they are holding up fine. Im not saying that wally world rims can do the same thing, but i dont think you have to spend 90 bucks on a rim for it to be considered a good rim. Also my 35 dollar Sette hub has also been working like its suppose to. I am a 225lb pretty aggressive rider and my local trails are filled with rocks and roots.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 2clue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,280
    If you're planning on building a blury AM bike then you should get 823s for the front and 819s for the rear. This will allow you to run 2.5 or bigger tires up front when you decide to do some lift assist trails. Both rims can take a serious beat and you'll have no issues with reliability from them.

    As for the tubeless system, if your having issue seating a new tire try mounting it normally with a tube and give the tires a good ten or so miles. This should soften up the tire and help it seat easier. Remember to use soapy water and really take your time to massage the tire in.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Quote Originally Posted by sizzo
    because


    The 819 is just the tubeless version of the 719, and will cost you mucho $$$ for that reason.

    I live in Southern Arizona, we grow rocks not grass. W/o tubeless, I was running LC nevegals w/ mid-weight tubes @ 35-40psi on my hardtail and was washing out in the corners and STILL pinching out every ride. It was the ride that I suffered a massive snake bike on the front...and then rear...and had only brought one extra tube, that forced me to switch, and I won't go back. Been riding them since September and though I've had to add more sealant because of all the acupuncture my tires have endured, I have not flatted once on the trail. I even mounted up the DH cased tires I run on my Heckler ghetto-tubeless, have not had a flat since and can drop the pressure to really dig in on the gravelly chunder that plagues our corners here.

    Also for all the guys who say they won't use tubeless because you might get a flat on the trail... TAKE AN EXTRA TUBE!!!! Just carry a normal bicycle tube (you should be carrying one already), and if your tire goes flat, you just remove your getto-tubeless/rim strips/valve and throw in the tube, inflate just as you otherwise would and go home. While installing your tires tubeless is a PITA (getting the Stan's sealant worked around the bead until there is no more small leaks = , but I'm not using UST tires), IMHO it is however virtually (not completely) maintenance free after that, you adjust your tire pressure based upon traction needs, not fear of pinch flats, and if you do flat/blow out the sidewall/dent the rim so badly that the bead won't seat/run over an anti-armor landmine, you are in no worse a position than if that happened with tubes. Throw in a spare and ride home.

    That being said, if you live in an area where you don't have a problem with pinch flatting already, are just looking to "shave ounces", or if you are one of those obsessive-compulsive tire swappers (or even someone who just is still experimenting with which tire to run), tubeless is not for you. You won't notice the difference and will hate it when it comes to swapping out rubber. I hate swapping out rubber, but I hate flatting more so tubeless still puts a smile on my face.
    Hi. I seldom have pinch flat/flats here. Infact, hardly, unless i rly put my tire pressure REAL low. Otherwise i never experience it. Perhaps the 719 is the better choice for me. I still prefer tube system. And yes, im a compulsive tire swapper. Thanks for the other guy's comment too

  38. #38
    grade A procrastinator
    Reputation: ronoranina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by mrgto
    I dont buy the whole you get what you pay for...
    Well let me help you to understand. What I meant was that 819s only weigh 480 grams and you can smash the hell out of them and they keep coming back for more. It may be the case that you can do so with your Sun SOS rims as well. But they are not 480 grams, and they're not UST rims. They are really well built rims that do what they are supposed to do at a pretty low weight. Seems pretty simple to me. That's why I paid 80 - 90 dollars, or whatever I paid.
    I don't have everything I want.

    But, I want everything I have.

  39. #39
    Gnar
    Reputation: Jet Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    476
    All these replies and no mention of the DT Swiss EX 5.1d?
    I have mine on Hope Pro II hubs and have been very happy with them. A little wider than the 819 and great for 2.35 tires! Don’t get me wrong, the 819 is a great rim too.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CarbonFiberFootprint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    79
    DT 5.1d on pro IIs here also - I've been plenty happy with them.
    They are apparently a little softer of a metal compound than the 819s, but I don't think I'm capable of bending these unless I just royally screwed up. I've landed flat on asphalt with them quite a few times and have nothing close to a bend- but that could just be suspension doing it's job.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,667
    I have had both 819's and dt 5.1. If you are not going tubeless the DT's are the way to go. Similiar weight/strenght but wider profile which makes it a better fit for larger tires. I did not like the profile of true 2.35 and larger tires on the 819's as much as I do on the 5.1's,

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    178
    I prefer to go tubeless myself

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    383
    Doesn't all this talk of how the best way to make tubeless systems work suggest that it is more hassle than it is worth.

    Believe me, when you get stuck out on a trail with a puncture in your tubeless tyre (and I will guarantee you will at some point) you will curse the very day you decided to go tubeless.

    Every time I have been riding in a group that includes people running tubeless, they have been the only ones to get punctures, and ended up putting tubes in. Save yourself the hassle and stay with tubes from the beginning.

  44. #44
    not a paid spokesperson
    Reputation: sizzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by mikey74
    Doesn't all this talk of how the best way to make tubeless systems work suggest that it is more hassle than it is worth.
    No, it just means that it is less idiot proof, and as such those who have found ways to make it work better are disseminating that info in the hopes that others will have the success that they have enjoyed.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikey74
    Believe me, when you get stuck out on a trail with a puncture in your tubeless tyre (and I will guarantee you will at some point) you will curse the very day you decided to go tubeless.
    I get punctures in my tubeless tires all the time. Often multiples in the same ride. I've had my tires strewn with goatheads, and picked them out with impunity, hearing air start escaping from each hole. Why? Because the sealant seals the punctures and prevents the tire from going flat, which is really the bigger issue. Funny, six months of riding 3-5 times a week and 'nary a flat on the trail, though nearly every time I rode my bike with tubes I cursed the day that neglected to go tubeless. Lets see, hating life once a week, vs potentially hating life maybe if some potential catastrophic thing happens...

    Quote Originally Posted by mikey74
    Every time I have been riding in a group that includes people running tubeless, they have been the only ones to get punctures, and ended up putting tubes in. Save yourself the hassle and stay with tubes from the beginning.
    Yes, you will get punctures, it's a fact of riding in a world with pointy things. Thats why God had Moses hook all the Israelites up with UST and some sealant and they beat the Egyptians, who were always stopping to patch the tubes on their chariots, across the Sinai to the promised land where the rode for forty years without flats, right?...err...ok, so I maybe I wasn't paying attention in Sunday school

    Again, Tubeless isn't for everyone. But it does a damn good job at what it's meant to do.

  45. #45
    Roll Tide
    Reputation: gkmeador's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    99
    ive got an 819 with a 2.4 Big Betty UST on the front of my bike and i luv it!

  46. #46
    wuss
    Reputation: dropadrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,364
    Quote Originally Posted by mikey74
    Doesn't all this talk of how the best way to make tubeless systems work suggest that it is more hassle than it is worth.
    A lot of simple things feel complicated to start with...

    Believe me, when you get stuck out on a trail with a puncture in your tubeless tyre (and I will guarantee you will at some point) you will curse the very day you decided to go tubeless.
    Not at all, I'll just take the spare inner tube out of my pack and put it on... That is if the hole is too big for the sealant to seal. Strange thing though, I've never needed it since going tubeless (used it quite frequently when running tubes).

    Every time I have been riding in a group that includes people running tubeless, they have been the only ones to get punctures, and ended up putting tubes in. Save yourself the hassle and stay with tubes from the beginning.
    LOL

    Guess trails and riders differ then?

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    667
    i was using 5.1s before, but now i'm using 729, really feels good, only had a couple of rides in but def feels super...
    check out great video coverage of anything mtb (well almost).

    http://www.mtbcut.tv

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    199
    Hi. I chanced upon the Atom Lab Pimp rims. Any comments abt them?

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    862
    Quote Originally Posted by AScott_user
    Hi. I chanced upon the Atom Lab Pimp rims. Any comments abt them?
    I hear it's a decent rim. No personal exp. with them though...
    Remember, "We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good time".-D.Ritchie

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    203
    Mavic 819. Unless you are just completely mechanically incompetant, UST beats tubes every time.


    And to note, UST does not mean all types of tubeless. Ghetto tubeless is just that.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •