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  1. #1
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    Rims for AM riding

    Hi guys. I'm currently using a Mavic XC717 Disc on my XC HT bike. Its a nice rim for tire sizes between 2.0" to 2.2". However im planning and saving up for a new FS bike, which would be an AM rig.

    May i know what rims can i use for AM use? Im planning to use 2.35" tires. Was kinda aiming at Mavic, DT and Syncros. Hope to hear from you guys.

  2. #2
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    the Mavic 819's seem to be one of the most popular. That's what I'll be using when I upgrade mine.

  3. #3
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    Mavic 819's I weight 180 ride aggressively,durable,lite.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by readingracing
    Mavic 819's I weight 180 ride aggressively,durable,lite.
    I see. Can it fit 2.35" tires? Was planning to use Maxxis High Rollers 26 x 2.35". I won't go tubeless tho, thats the advice given by my local mates. Haha

  5. #5
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    I ran a WTB Prowler 2.5 without issues on my 819's. Tubeless is the way to go. I was running that tire at 28 psi over the entire season and never had a problem.

  6. #6
    MattSavage
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    I like the Mavic 321's with XT hubs... Solid, relatively light, super cheap... Build up your own, save some dough...
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  7. #7
    some know me as mongo
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    i have the mavic EN521 on mine and thus far love the things. they are pretty light and biuilt up great. also they are still true and round though i have not put too much of a beating on them. As for the whole tubeless thing that is still personal preference. personally i don't like tubeless because it is heavier (though maybe not for much longer) and it still has its fair share of problems. especially if you are a heavier person.

  8. #8
    Hmmmmm
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    I like Sun Rhynos and Single tracks.
    Other rims mentioned usually keep the weight below 600 grams.
    The rim weight is the most important thing to watch. Many wheelsets are light overall, but the rim weight is too high.
    It's better to have a heavier hub, with a lighter rim.
    Whatever you do, try to keep the rim weight between 500 and 600 grams. That is the best range, for a balance of strength to weight ratio.
    Also, make sure to have a rim, that is between 27 and 29mm in outside width.
    Some of the lighter "all mountian" rims, are too narrow. The narrow width is how they are keeping the weight down, while maintaining strength, but then the rim won't properly support the wider tires used in all mountain riding.
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
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  9. #9
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    I built up a xtr/ mavic 321 wheel set. the are annodized grey and match the hubs/ rotor/frame color! 560 grams and very strong.

    The 521s are lighter and probably just as strong.

    " This is the follow up, I rode sullivan canyon down from the top, the rims took every hit and felt really good. lots of squared off ruts, broken shale, ramps drops roots etc. although a lbs told me they were heavy, they realy felt great on the trail, an I hand no problems lofting the bike. "
    Last edited by nagatahawk; 03-09-2009 at 09:45 AM.

  10. #10
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    Mavic XM719 or 819 great really strong rim, 2.35's fit fine, I've just built some EX721 to take a bigger 2.5 tire, another good rim not to heavy,

  11. #11
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    whadabout stans flow rims - love them

  12. #12
    cgrocho
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattsavage
    I like the Mavic 321's with XT hubs... Solid, relatively light, super cheap... Build up your own, save some dough...
    I really enjoy wheelbuilding and agree here, but I gotta say I haven't found much of a cost savings by buying all the components separately. And I really like the 819s too, I have pounded on mine with no issues whatsoever.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AScott_user
    I won't go tubeless tho, thats the advice given by my local mates. Haha
    ...I hope you are kidding.

  14. #14
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    another vote for 819 rims. very solid and pretty light too at 480 grams

    oh and definitely go tubeless if you can. once you factor in the weight of tubes to go along with non-tubeless tires it about equals the weight of only a tubeless tire.
    plus you have all of the benefits that a tubeless rim and tire brings to the table. i won't go back to tubes... ever!
    I don't have everything I want.

    But, I want everything I have.

  15. #15
    Hmmmmm
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    Quote Originally Posted by sizzo
    ...I hope you are kidding.
    Most of the riders around my area won't use tubeless anymore.
    They've had too much trouble trying to reseat them after field repairs.
    They've had cuts that are too big for the Stans to seal anyways. (if you're using Stans.)
    More than once, I've walked into a local shop that shall remain nameless, and they were struggling to seat a tubeless tire and rim.
    That was with compressed air available, and all the shop tools.
    If you're using something like Stan's, then it's quite difficult to boot a tire in the middle of nowhere.
    Because of these issues, you have to carry spare tubes anyways.

    The general opinion around here is, that tubeless is great when it works, but when it doesn't, it's a real pain in the ass that can leave you stranded.
    We have lots of sharp things around here in the desert, and too many people, end up having to run a tube in one or more their "tubeless" tires anyways. The reason for this, is that the cuts are too big for something like Stans to seal, so the tire gets a boot and a tube. Or just a tube.

    If you end up having to run a tube in a tubeless tire, the rolling resistance is actually higher than a normal tubed tire design.

    It's also cheaper to run a standard tubed setup. Some of us, can't afford the "latest and greatest" stuff anyways.
    "I thought of that while riding my bike."
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar
    Most of the riders around my area won't use tubeless anymore.
    They've had too much trouble trying to reseat them after field repairs.
    They've had cuts that are too big for the Stans to seal anyways. (if you're using Stans.)
    More than once, I've walked into a local shop that shall remain nameless, and they were struggling to seat a tubeless tire and rim.
    That was with compressed air available, and all the shop tools.
    If you're using something like Stan's, then it's quite difficult to boot a tire in the middle of nowhere.
    Because of these issues, you have to carry spare tubes anyways.

    The general opinion around here is, that tubeless is great when it works, but when it doesn't, it's a real pain in the ass that can leave you stranded.
    We have lots of sharp things around here in the desert, and too many people, end up having to run a tube in one or more their "tubeless" tires anyways. The reason for this, is that the cuts are too big for something like Stans to seal, so the tire gets a boot and a tube. Or just a tube.

    If you end up having to run a tube in a tubeless tire, the rolling resistance is actually higher than a normal tubed tire design.

    It's also cheaper to run a standard tubed setup. Some of us, can't afford the "latest and greatest" stuff anyways.
    Exactly. Thats what my friend (a mechanic at a LBS) told me. Its great when it works, but it gonna be a pain in the ass when it fails. My friend especially highlighted the sealant problem. he said that proper maintenance is needed for them. If they dries up and sticks to the rim, theres a chance that you wont be able to use the rim again. I can't rmbr exactly what he said, but this is the general idea.

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the replies guys. Seems like the 819 is the choice to go. I've seen before a wheelset of 819s laced to XT hubs. A sick looking wheelset(its sick for me cause i cant afford for high end hubs since im a student ) Now i know how its rated by you guys, perhaps i shall go along with the 819.

  18. #18
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    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.

  19. #19
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    If you haven't decided yet, I'd definitely recommend Halo Freedom Discs if you're looking this route (they can be a PITA to find though, they're supposed to be the same as Syncros DS28 rims). They aren't the lightest rim out there, but they're very strong! However if you're looking for tubeless the Mavic's are probably better.
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  20. #20
    Wiz
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    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.
    EXACTLY . Been running 819s w/Kings on my everything ride w/tubeless 2.3 Schwalbees for a while with great results. They ride AWESOME & I really dig the capabilities of lower air pressures. I have not had any problems once I figured em out a little. We have MANY tube flats from thorns here & so I run 3ozs of slime in = No Flats what-so-ever. As you can see in pic they are currently set up w/tubed wired beaded studs...a BlTCH to get on? YES. I carry a tube with this setup & I should have put slimed tubes in, but winter here is almost over & I can't wait to go back to tubeless. That said, my nephew ran Sun rims w/shim hubs w/2.5s. (2nd pic) They were less expensive, he hucks and they held up real well. I tossed in my burly (pic3) just for comparison, ex823s again tubeless w/Kings & sapine spokes...simply unbelievable w/2.5s but a little pricey & heavy from what you may want. As Pete said, if we can't convince you to go tubeless & you like Mavic go w/other options. I rode 321s for many years & on another ride I have em mounted w/Kings, nice set up but on long rides I carry at least 1 tube and a patch kit. Good luck there is a lot of great stuff out there!
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    If you're not going to use tubeless, the 819 has no benefits over the 719 and it is heavier just because of the tubeless assembly hardware. 819 is the tubeless version of the 719 rim.

    But honestly... the tubeless thing is well worth it. The "can't use the rims because of dried on sealant" thing is in the category of Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD). There is also a world of difference between a poorly implemented rim strip type tubeless solution and the inherently sealed 819 rim. There is a world of difference between bodging a weight weenie tyre with sealant onto a rim and running tubeless ready or UST tyres.

    I can inflate my tubeless with a Topeak Mountain Morph portable pump. The trick to it is simple:

    #1 use tubeless specific tyres
    #2 get both beads in the central valley of the rim
    #3 lift the wheel off the ground so the tyre isn't distorted
    #4 pump

    Considering you know the tyre you intend to use is available in tubeless, if you get 819 rims you'd be mad not to give tubeless a try.
    I see. But is using sealant a must in tubeless systems? If not, i might consider using tubeless.

  22. #22
    Wiz
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    No, not a must. However, I truly would not worry about using sealant,,,it's a good thing . Whoever told you that sealant in a tubeless rim can dry out and possibly ruin your rim is WRONG imho.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wiz
    No, not a must. However, I truly would not worry about using sealant,,,it's a good thing . Whoever told you that sealant in a tubeless rim can dry out and possibly ruin your rim is WRONG imho.
    Wow. I would like to try not using sealant. Then it would rly be like a vehicle's tubeless tire. I hate to use additional things. I prefer to keep it simple, just like the qoute K.I.S.S. Haha. Then can i run without sealant on low pressure? Will the tire come off?

  24. #24
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    You can clean the rims out with a stiff brush easy and no need to worry about the slime. Also I always carry a tube since if you cut a side wall on a tubeless you would have done the same on a tubed tire. If sealent wont seal a hole in the tire pop it off take out the valve and put in a tube till you get home and are able to fix it.

    Trail side maitence with tubeless can be a pain if you have to unseat a rim so it is easier to bring a tube and run tubes if you get a flat which will not happen often.

  25. #25
    Wiz
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    ... and if we just ... I like things simple too

    I hear ya on keeping things simple & when I wanted to upgrade it took my (Superior mechanic) Bud many a beer to talk me into em...I had all the concerns you have expressed. That said, I never will regret my decision. Some old school guys (I'm old) have a million reasons why not to go tubeless & it's just my opinion that once set up they are simple because you hardly ever have to deal w/em & thats why I run sealant "Slime".

    You just pour 1/2 a 6oz bottle of the stuff into the tire once one bead is set on rim correctly, use your fingers or a lever to get the other bead in. Hit w/a compressor until they pop, back off air like you never thought possible & laugh. BTW: many threads on tubeless (debates really). Keep in mind, when the tubeless tires are new it's easier to use a compressor to get it to seat, but I have used a bigboy compressed air canister & sometimes a floorpump can work but may be a little drustrating until they get expanded a few times.

    I too thought it all was a big pain in the arss, until I ran them for over a year with No Leaks at Low, med & high air pressures. I had some issues because a valve stem in one was junk. In all fairness though, a cheap compressor or your LBS's makes life w/tubeless much less frustrating especially in the beginning. So, as you can see, it took me a little while to get the scene down, but when it came down to it as ro what my next build rims for my (new & unbelievable) FR whip would be, I without hesitation went with another tubeless setup..soo sweet. If I can get the dough up, I will take the CKs off the 321s on my HT & go w/a another non-ghetto tubeless setup. Another thing to keep in mind, like Pete said, when reviewing opinions make sure your not reading about ghetto rim strip setups, I hear of a lot of headaches, but they do work. It's real simple about real tubeless rims, no spoke holes, just a airtight rubberized valve and hooky sides, when something pukes or the valve leaks the "slime seals it & you just keep on riding, the only extra part I like to have on hand is a nice extra valve stem. Badly Torn sidewalls? Well, I don't know...if I'm alone, way out there I carry a tube anyway. If that doesn't work. I will walk or go the hypothermia route. Hope this helps, my man

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