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  1. #1
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    Reputation: George Gr's Avatar
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    Rear Sag adjustment

    Hi there,
    I read an article the other day saying that you adjust the front sag while on attack position and the rear sag while sited on the saddle.
    I thought you dial the back on the attack position too. Is it too much difference? I haven't tried it yet to see.
    How you do it?
    "Do not go where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail" Ralph Waldo Emerson

  2. #2
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Gr View Post
    Hi there,
    I read an article the other day saying that you adjust the front sag while on attack position and the rear sag while sited on the saddle.
    I thought you dial the back on the attack position too. Is it too much difference? I haven't tried it yet to see.
    How you do it?
    I know for the DW-Link, which is rather specific about the rear sag, you do it while seated.

    I think that is generally how you do the front as well, but honestly, I've never paid much attention to the sag measurement on the front. I just go with what feels good, does not dive too much, and uses an appropriate amount of travel.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  3. #3
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    Set rear sag in your pedaling position so that the wheel is in the correct spot for optimized anti-squat.

  4. #4
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    Sag should be 25% - 30% of rear travel but it all depends on riders wishes and feels.
    Both sags (front and rear) should be set in riding position with weight distributed like in real riding.

  5. #5
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    i think it would depend on which position you spend most of your time in? if you spend 90% of your riding time in attack position, it wouldn't make sense to set the sag while sitting?

  6. #6
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    start with pressure charts available. weight the bike gently and check what the sage. 25-30% to start then make adjustments fine tuning to your feel from there. for the front depending on how slack your front end is, again start with pressure charts and then really just adjust to what feels good.
    when you hit the trail what really matters is how it feels and performs.
    Juice

  7. #7
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    25-30% is not always true. FIND OUT FROM THE MANUFACTURER what the recommended rear sag is, as it plays a major part in pedaling efficiency (those fancy linkages are designed to have optimum anti-squat in certain ranges of the suspension travel). Set rear squat in your pedaling position. If that's a DH bike that means standing. If it's a trail bike that probably means sitting. If it's an AM bike decide for yourself.

    You have more leeway with setting front sag. In general, if you want to optimize for downhill run less sag then more up front (as once you're pointed downhill the fork will sag in deeper then it does when you're measuring on flat ground) and set sag while standing in the attack position. Personally I run 20% sag on both my DH and AM bikes.

  8. #8
    usually cranky
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    i tried to set my front sag.got it right according to the guy but my fork felt like a rock. fitter was a specialized fitting expert btw.

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