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  1. #1
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    Platform pedals for pedaling

    I will preface this by saying that I do know about the platform pedal shoot out thread, I just really don't want to read 1K+ responses, most of which are people not really contributing.

    That being said, I've decided to get a new set of flats to replace an older set of wellgo's that I have (non-replaceable pins, about half of which have been ripped out). So, I'm looking for a grippy flat that will do well on long pedally rides as well as descending.

    1) Straitline de facto
    2) Saint
    3) DMR v12 mag

    I'm not 100% what my riding conditions will be in the near future (moving to central PA), but I usually stay out of wet and sloppy conditions.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  2. #2
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    I just purchased a pair of Shimano Saint pedals and Teva links shoe.
    This combo works great and the pedals are very good looking

  3. #3
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    Deity Skyskraper

    Best platform on the market. Deity Skyskraper There is soo much grip it feels like you are glued to the bike. And damn they thin!! Plus they come in sexy colors to bling out your bike!




  4. #4
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    I ride rolling hills so have a lot of pedaling & have used the Straitline's for 3 years. The SL's are great; tough & easy to maintain. They're not as thin as some of the other pedals on the market..

  5. #5
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    i have the Saints, love em

    and fwiw, MTBA just tested a bunch of pedals. this is what they said about the Saints...

    "Comments:
    Shimano is not the kind of company that releases a design with- out first doing their research. The Saint component group is designed to take all the abuse a gravity rider can throw at it. This pedal is a reflection of that mindset.

    This pedal would have been at the top of our list for downhilling and bike parks. The tried-and-true bearing and axle system, combined with the burly pedal body, make for a bomber of a pedal that is perfect for gravity bikes. For trail riding, though, this pedal is overbuilt."

    full test results... Shootout: Seven Flat Pedals Go Pin to Pin | News | mountain-bike-action

  6. #6
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    When I get the cash Im getting the canfields. They look like winners to me.

  7. #7
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    I am using Canfield Ultimates. They work fantastic for pedaling - but I installed much shorter pins than those supplied by Canfield. Not much mud where I ride - so original pins with fiveten shoes is gross overkill and they kinda negate thinness of the pedal. Still too early to comment on durabiity - but so far so good (2 month of not very intensive riding). I do like new (Ultimate) design better than the original. No bearing bulge.

  8. #8
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    I'm just looking at the three mentioned. I'm not interested (or financed) to look past them.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  9. #9
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    After 20+ years of clipless I went with the straitlines, mostly because they got great reviews and were made in North America. Been really happy so far, though I'd suggest maybe using shinguards for a while if you're making the switch. A little more pedal strike than I was previously used to as well. Pedaling efficiency both up and down has been great though, much better than I'd expected.

  10. #10
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    Re: Platform pedals for pedaling

    Superstars nano, I've tried a few flats and nothing betters these for the money. Check the feed back.

    http://superstar.tibolts.co.uk/produ...roducts_id=194

  11. #11
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    I am on the Saints.
    Pros: grippy, largish platform, durable (body, pins, internals), less than $100
    Cons: a little heavier, a little less concave in profile, and a little thicker than the newest class of flats, more than $75
    4/5 stars, would recommend to a friend, blah blah blah

  12. #12
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    What about the AMPs? They are lighter then the De Factos, you can be them for about the same price, great grip, and the platform is plenty big. I like mine.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    What about the AMPs? They are lighter then the De Factos, you can be them for about the same price, great grip, and the platform is plenty big. I like mine.
    I can find de facto's new for $88, used for around $60. I haven't found any amps for less than 125. I put $90 as my upper limit cause i feel that anymore money than that for a pedal is ridiculous. Hell, I paid less for my fork than some of these pedals cost.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlockinz View Post
    I put $90 as my upper limit cause i feel that anymore money than that for a pedal is ridiculous.
    Buy two pairs of MG-1s and go to lunch on the change.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob View Post
    Buy two pairs of MG-1s and go to lunch on the change.
    I've got a pair of mg-1. Nice pedal, but I want something a little grippier
    Just another redneck with a bike

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlockinz View Post
    I've got a pair of mg-1. Nice pedal, but I want something a little grippier
    I presume you've already got sticky shoes, yes?

    The MG-1 pins *should* come out, and if they will you could load in some longer pins like Canfield uses. They're all the same M4 x 0.7 set screws. But, I have had no luck loosening up a pin in my MG-1s, they seem to be put in with a lock-tite compound that just won't let go. The allen wrench rounds out before the pedal turns loose of the pin.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  17. #17
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    I second the superstar nanos.
    Have used the mg1s and v12 mags also. Superstar nanos beat both hands down. Hard to get anything that light, solid and smooth for anything close to the money.

  18. #18
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    I love Straitline de Facto pedals. They're reliable and easy to service. They are awesome.

  19. #19
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    i really wanted to like the dmr's. I love the look of the shape and the v8 version polished are sweet and serviceable: but they are just too small for my feet. went back to teh beefy super tenderizers. serviceable, awesome shape for grip, removable pins, uber cheap, last forever and weigh about as much as a gun safe. the are my go to pedal.

    Trying some unfortunately named Kore Torsion SX pedals on the 29er to check them out: much lighter, sealed, low profile, much less grip than primo super tenderizers or the dmr's but real comfy and wide for long rides.

    so basically dmr's were too small and hurt my feet after a while.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob View Post
    I presume you've already got sticky shoes, yes?

    The MG-1 pins *should* come out, and if they will you could load in some longer pins like Canfield uses. They're all the same M4 x 0.7 set screws. But, I have had no luck loosening up a pin in my MG-1s, they seem to be put in with a lock-tite compound that just won't let go. The allen wrench rounds out before the pedal turns loose of the pin.
    Try heating the pedals with a heat gun and clamp the heck out of the pins with vice grips. That should get those pins out. Don't use a torch or you will melt the pedals. If you use a powerful heat gun be careful with your distance from the pedals and how long you apply heat.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehigh View Post
    I love Straitline de Facto pedals. They're reliable and easy to service. They are awesome.
    I second this, ive owned a tonne of pedals and the straitlines are at the top of the heap, i couldnt recommend them enough.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    When I get the cash Im getting the canfields. They look like winners to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by sergio8691 View Post
    I am using Canfield Ultimates. They work fantastic for pedaling - but I installed much shorter pins than those supplied by Canfield. Not much mud where I ride - so original pins with fiveten shoes is gross overkill and they kinda negate thinness of the pedal. Still too early to comment on durabiity - but so far so good (2 month of not very intensive riding). I do like new (Ultimate) design better than the original. No bearing bulge.
    Not a fan of the Canfields.

    Main reason: Q factor. This is a design flaw with a lot of newer pedal designs out there. The lack of wrench flats/axle between the pedal body and the crank arm makes for a narrow stance. Everyone designing pedals these days has a similar body size parameter, but they're all too close to the crank IMO.

    Canfields I used on a demo bike recently had me reeling. I was wearing 5-ten Impacts, and felt like the pedal stopped 2/3 from the edge. I want my whole foot on the platform. Not "most" of it.

    (2 cents)
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Cliffy View Post
    Not a fan of the Canfields.

    Main reason: Q factor. This is a design flaw with a lot of newer pedal designs out there. The lack of wrench flats/axle between the pedal body and the crank arm makes for a narrow stance. Everyone designing pedals these days has a similar body size parameter, but they're all too close to the crank IMO.

    Canfields I used on a demo bike recently had me reeling. I was wearing 5-ten Impacts, and felt like the pedal stopped 2/3 from the edge. I want my whole foot on the platform. Not "most" of it.

    (2 cents)
    Curious which flats you think don't have this problem. I'm feeling like my feet are hanging off mine.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hillharman View Post
    Curious which flats you think don't have this problem. I'm feeling like my feet are hanging off mine.
    Twenty6 Predators.

    Nice, big and wide, but surely a little too pricy... I just dig everything about them though. 100% USA made, by a real shredder. I'll surely keep buying them, even though they put me in the poorhouse.
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  25. #25
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    Platform pedals for pedaling

    Yup, I have both. Predators are much wider. Get the stainless spindles; they're much less expensive than the titanium.
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  26. #26
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    Canfield ultimates for sure. Best flats I have ever used. Not sure what the above person meant about the q factor, but they feel perfect for me. Nice and big, simple bushing design that lasts forever... All good things.
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  27. #27
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    Re: Platform pedals for pedaling

    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    I second this, ive owned a tonne of pedals and the straitlines are at the top of the heap, i couldnt recommend them enough.
    Yeah when my buddy's transition dirtbag fell off the rack of my car going 70 mph, his de facto pedal hit the ground first. After touching it up with a file and doing a bushing rebuild, they're running good as new. Mine go through relative abuse on the trails, there are plenty of good rock strikes that have left their mark. The pedals have destroyed a few rocks on their own come to think of it.

    My feet are wide size 12s. If I don't order a pair of wide shoes, my toes don't fit. I love that the de facto pedals supports my feet so comfortably.

    Straitline.

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  28. #28
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    I've got the Saints. They work great with my 5.10s. I went flats to clipless, now I'm back to flats and this seems to be the best combo for me.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Cliffy View Post
    Not a fan of the Canfields.

    Main reason: Q factor. This is a design flaw with a lot of newer pedal designs out there. The lack of wrench flats/axle between the pedal body and the crank arm makes for a narrow stance. Everyone designing pedals these days has a similar body size parameter, but they're all too close to the crank IMO.

    Canfields I used on a demo bike recently had me reeling. I was wearing 5-ten Impacts, and felt like the pedal stopped 2/3 from the edge. I want my whole foot on the platform. Not "most" of it.

    (2 cents)
    I recommend DMR Vaults for you. They're enormous. I've been using the Straitline AMPs and really love them for my pedal bike. Now that they have the thinner washers they spin much more freely and don't have issues with the pedals backing out (which I think was blown out of proportion anyway and people under-torquing them).
    Last edited by BaeckerX1; 04-18-2013 at 10:23 PM.
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  30. #30
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    + another for canfields. These pedals are light, thin and strong. I have been on them for about a year now and have put them through the ringer. Rarely do I pedal strike. Only downside as with any pedal is price, but if you do it you wont regret them.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaeckerX1 View Post
    I recommend DMR Vaults for you. They're enormous. I've been using the Straitline AMPs and really love them for my pedal bike. Now that they have the thinner washers they spin much more freely and don't have issues with the pedals backing out.
    Already have Twenty6 pedals on all my bikes. Thanks for the advice though!
    Quote Originally Posted by kidwoo
    The internet sounds like a tough place to ride.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Cliffy View Post
    Already have Twenty6 pedals on all my bikes. Thanks for the advice though!
    Cool. I just thought you might like another option since they're almost half the price. Still pricey though, just not as much as Twenty6s. Twenty6 makes some nice looking stuff, the price just seems a bit excessive to me, but I guess it's all relative.

    The Vaults are rated pretty highly for anyone else looking for a nice, wide platform.

    DMR Vault Flat Pedals Review - BikeRadar

    DMR Vault Pedal - Tested - Pinkbike
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  33. #33
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    I have Canfield Ultimates on one bike and Saints on the other. I think just about any pedal mentioned here will give you stellar traction...IF....you have the right shoe to match.
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  34. #34
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    DMR Vaults are massive! Ive been thinking recently that they are actually almost too big for AM riding . I say that with size 13 feet and 510 impact highs. Definitely a perfect size for big feet + DH/shuttling.

    After 2 years of beating them to sh** in the Northeast and still going strong, I can definitely say I love them.
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  35. #35
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    Platform pedals for pedaling

    I went for Wellgo mags for value

    Any recommendations for value shoes?

    I have ZERO need or ability for pricey top of the line flat pedals or shoes at this point. Just starting out & experimenting after eons of riding clipless


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  36. #36
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    I have used Straitline De Facto pedals for the last 2.5 years and love them for FR/DH. They are beefy, have a large platform, grippy pins, have a substantial spindle, are CNC'd in Canada, and are a total bling item. I wouldn't really recommend them for lots of pedaling because of the seal drag. The bushings (and preload o-ring) just do not spin as smooth as the bearings in my Shimano pedals (used XT Trail or new Saint). I had to rub my spindle down with some fine sand paper to make them spin smoother. Not a big deal, but the extra drag is kind of annoying on longer rides.

    Don't fall for the fad on super thin pedals. Pedals, handlebars, and stems are the LAST places I would ever want to get feather light parts for - they are all major weight bearing parts that could cause serious injuries at failure. All of the new pedals have crazy small spindles...no thanks I have had enough major injuries for all of us. Straitline and Shimano all feature proper spindles that have a reputation for durability.

    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    I went for Wellgo mags for value

    Any recommendations for value shoes?

    I have ZERO need or ability for pricey top of the line flat pedals or shoes at this point. Just starting out & experimenting after eons of riding clipless
    You made a solid choice for value pedals, but I can't really think of value shoes. I would expect you to spend $80+. But hey, you can use them for trail building days too! I paid $90 for my 5.10 Impacts on sale almost 3 years ago and they are still going strong. I have hundreds of rides on them - and I ride hard. You will be best off getting something that fits well (and has a stiff enough sole) and swallow the extra $40 you will be spending.

  37. #37
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    I've gone from Spank Spikes ( a little squeaky with 510's) & flogged out the bushes fairly quickly but the grip was good.
    Now on Original Canfields, for me they have better grip than the Spike's for the up's .
    I haven't slipped a pedal yet on these like I have on the Spike's & I hope I don't .
    The long pins along with a wide & one of the lowest platforms I think is the key, I just hope they last.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by dklopp View Post
    Don't fall for the fad on super thin pedals. Pedals, handlebars, and stems are the LAST places I would ever want to get feather light parts for - they are all major weight bearing parts that could cause serious injuries at failure. All of the new pedals have crazy small spindles...no thanks I have had enough major injuries for all of us. Straitline and Shimano all feature proper spindles that have a reputation for durability.
    I agree with you on handlebars and stems, but I don't agree that thin pedals are a fad, nor do I think that they're a failure risk. The only thread I remember with a Canfield Crampon failure was the Carnage Asada thread, and it eventually came out that the strike that bent the spindle also bent a SLX M665 crankarm.

    dwt: As far as value shoes, you can probably find a pair of last year's Sombrio Shazams or Loams at deep discounts now. Google, but check Backcountry. I rode Impacts for 4 years, but they were (over)due for replacement, and I figured I'd try the Sombrios. They aren't quite as stiff or as grippy, but they still work well, and look a lot better. And the plus side- they don't catch anywhere near as much dirt. The Impacts may as well be a funnel around your ankle.
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  39. #39
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    Only ones I have used on your list are the Straitlines. That being said I loved them for grip and they are tough as hell, the only thing I did not like is they weight 560grams and are thick so I had a lot of pedal strikes.

    I switched over to the Canfield Ultimates and put a set of straitline pins in them. I am loving them so far about 90% less pedal strikes on the same trails. They are above the price you mentioned but you might always find some used ones.....

    Though for a tough as nails pedal you cannot beat the straitlines and you can rebuild them with a lighter..

  40. #40
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    Don't fall for the fad on super thin pedals. Pedals, handlebars, and stems are the LAST places I would ever want to get feather light parts for - they are all major weight bearing parts that could cause serious injuries at failure. All of the new pedals have crazy small spindles...no thanks I have had enough major injuries for all of us.
    Strange post. Thin pedals work better for all the usual reasons. As for the spindle strength 'issue'--there are low profile pedals like point1's that are very strong. I should know...I destroy inferior pedals at Northstar.

    In case you're unfamiliar with pedal design, many of the low profile pedals make use of DU bushings as the outer support since those enable large diameter spindles. Depending on the design, they can be as durable as a full bearing pedal. Too many factors to make a generalization one way or another.
    Originally posted by bucksaw87
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