Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 125
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Pimpalicious A/M ride build

    Check out this Pimpalicious AM ride I'm building. Lots of attention to detail, and some cool unique mods designed to raise your descent fun factor

    More to follow this week...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    657
    So what's the C/F bar there for?
    pUt Da LiMe In Da CoKe YoU nUt


  3. #3
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Quote Originally Posted by Raghavan
    So what's the C/F bar there for?
    Floating rear brake

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    21

    More details

    Dude,
    The photos show plenty of bling.
    Whats the frame and forks?

    Cheers

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    more than that...

    Lots more unique stuff going on than just a floating rear brake, some you can see now more you con not - but soon...

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MTB1986's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    862
    Hotness!
    Remember, "We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good time".-D.Ritchie

  7. #7
    Chillin the Most
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,028
    Oooooooooooooooh-aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!!! It's a Nomad with a floater and some Chris Bling hubs. Nice build, love the contrast of the white-red.

    Hope you don't mind my asking, but whats the floater all about?? I know what they're mainly used for, but on VPP types & FSR's there's really no reason. Are you using it to alter the braking and no I don;t mean brake-stiffening(jack)?

  8. #8
    Dirt Displacer
    Reputation: Bombardier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    606
    I'd really love to see more of this ride, only less fuzzy....
    Bombardier :::: MCM #249

    Trails Listings, GPS Tracks, & Forums
    Singletracks.com

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GuruAtma's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,709
    Nice bike. Now you need to invest in a camera with auto-focus
    功夫大师喜欢骑着他的自行车在山上。

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,425
    Looks pretty cool, is it a Nomad?

  11. #11
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: coldsteele's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,282
    How big of a rear rotor do you plan on putting on that?
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    ?????????????

    What... No one noticed the rear solid through axle what gives?

  13. #13
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    What... No one noticed the rear solid through axle what gives?
    Teasing is boreing

  14. #14
    baka baka!
    Reputation: x9typesh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    69
    nice...could use some better photos tho...use the macro function if you're using a point and shoot...step back a bit and zoom

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    What... No one noticed the rear solid through axle what gives?
    Meh...my Hadley has that already - a 10mm thru-axle.
    As others have said - are you going to run a huge rear rotor?

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Meh...my Hadley has that already - a 10mm thru-axle.

    Yep... I tried to get red Hadley's, could not. Although I have had some people tell me the aluminum T/A they have does not hold up to many taking on and offs. I am working on a 64AL ti set up, should be done soon.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    How big of a rear rotor do you plan on putting on that?

    Just a standard 6" rotor. I'm all about the best contact, great modulation quality brakes. For me its more about flow and momentum than brute force braking.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    Just a standard 6" rotor. I'm all about the best contact, great modulation quality brakes. For me its more about flow and momentum than brute force braking.
    That's cool. Looks like a well thought out set up. Post pictures of the complete bike when it's done - looks like it will be an awesome build!

    The Al axle on the Hadley had me wondering too, but so far it has worked flawlessly, and a Ti axle is avaliable also.

    Hurry up and get your bike finished, and post a ride report!!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    29
    Get on with it.

  20. #20
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,159
    Step 1: Finish the build!

    Step 2: Take the complete bike outside in the sun.

    Step 3: Position yourself eight feet away from the bike.

    Step 4: Take a good pic.

    Step 5: Post pic here, and stop teasing us!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Get on with it. step 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

    Sorry Boy's,

    My life has been a whirl wind of late. My wife and I bought a new home, and can't seem to sell our other. Need to move personaly, T.I. on a new building for my bus., moving that soon too. We just have to much on our plate right now! Anywho here's a glimps...

    Finished her a week ago, she came in @ just under 31lbs. Large Nomad with a floating rear brake, steering damper, Pushed DHX coil w/ 1.38 I.D. Ti coil, Maverick speedball post, SRAM XO shifters/rr der. XTR cranks/ cassette/ ft der. / King H/set/hubs w/rear solid through axle via Brake Therapy, Stans 32mm front hoop,24.5 rear hoop/ Magura Louise Free ride brakes. Stans Alu rotors, and all the Ti hardware she would take.

    Some pics of my dirty little biiaaatch.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #22
    Life is Good
    Reputation: Judd97's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    1,498


    Sexy bike! Hows she ride?
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain

  23. #23
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,159
    Quote Originally Posted by Judd97


    Sexy bike! Hows she ride?
    Yeah, I for one am extremely glad to see some fresh mud on the new build.

  24. #24
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Gots to love a floating brake on a VPP

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    doggyman

    What, another naysayer???

  26. #26
    locked - time out
    Reputation: TIMBERRR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,391
    All that and you are only running a 6" disc up front.

    Tisk Tisk.

  27. #27
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by moment
    All that and you are only running a 6" disc up front.

    Tisk Tisk.
    Please, that things a bike path queen. Those 6" stans aluminum weight weenie rotors would overheat on anything steeper than a driveway.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  28. #28
    I CAN ALWAYS GO BIGGER
    Reputation: RYAN E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    742
    Grip Shift come on!.Nice build anyways

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Everybody's a critic.

    We have some damn steep fast fire road descents and I have not had a problem. But then this bike was not built for ski lift weenies. I happen to prefer grip shift I have been riding it since 91-92 and it works beautifully for me, don't know what your problem is? I suppose I could say something along the same lines as you guys and call anyone who is riding air suspension a weenie cross country racer boy. But thats not my style, different strokes for different folks. I suppose you guys would put down the guy who pulls up in a Ferrari, saying Oh man thats only a 360 Modena.... You know you would burn up those brakes on the track unless you have the Challenge Stradale with Carbon rotors.... blah blah blah....

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Bike path queen....

    Tell me there spanky who hides behind a bunch of silliness, where do you live and what is the terrain you ride like? I can assure you where I ride is no Bike Path.

    I often find the guys that are the first to say I'm this and your that are the first to start making excuses on the rides. I like to speak softly and whoop ass on the down hill. I'm not the first up the climbs with anyone I ride with in my area but I'm sure as hell the first down the descents.

  31. #31
    "Its All Good"
    Reputation: Whafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    10,697
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    We have some damn steep fast fire road descents and I have not had a problem. But then this bike was not built for ski lift weenies. I happen to prefer grip shift I have been riding it since 91-92 and it works beautifully for me, don't know what your problem is? I suppose I could say something along the same lines as you guys and call anyone who is riding air suspension a weenie cross country racer boy. But thats not my style, different strokes for different folks. I suppose you guys would put down the guy who pulls up in a Ferrari, saying Oh man thats only a 360 Modena.... You know you would burn up those brakes on the track unless you have the Challenge Stradale with Carbon rotors.... blah blah blah....
    dhinkey, dont bite, these guys are just getting at you. It is called tall poppy syndrome.... You know what you ride terrrain area etc... My first thought was dam will those rotas stand up to that.. But then thought, you are no fool, you have thought of things, have been following this post.. Remember some folk just jump on, look at your pic and be critical........... Human nature, which sucks............

    A great lookimg ride, enjoy..................
    The_Lecht_Rocks: whafe - cheeers - may i offer an official apology for the wagon wheeler "dis-belief"

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    That things a blah blah blah

    So Mr. Rivet,

    Is your OC Local for Orange County, Ca.?

  33. #33
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    So Mr. Rivet,

    Is your OC Local for Orange County, Ca.?
    Dude, I was actually half joking but if you're gonna start a thread telling everybody how badass your bike is you better have a little thicker skin and be prepared for some comments.

    mod·es·ty

    1. The state or quality of being modest.
    2. Reserve or propriety in speech, dress, or behavior.
    3. Lack of pretentiousness; simplicity.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Dude, I was actually half joking

    Fair enough then...

    Although I thought in the beginning all I was doing was sharing my excitement for my new bike with like minded A/M riders... Then most of what I got seemed to be critics and naysayers.

    So you did not say if your OC local stands for Orange County, Ca.?

  35. #35
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    Fair enough then...

    Although I thought in the beginning all I was doing was sharing my excitement for my new bike with like minded A/M riders... Then most of what I got seemed to be critics and naysayers.

    So you did not say if your OC local stands for Orange County, Ca.?
    Yep. Orange County, Ca.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  36. #36
    Neg reppers r my biatches
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,250
    watch it dude, my mom uses stans rotors

  37. #37
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    watch it dude, my mom uses stans rotors
    Fo, is it raining where you are. Man I got up early to ride up to the top of Saddleback Mtn from my house and it friggin started raining on me...hard. Had to work all day yesterday and my day off I get rained on, sweet. I washed my car last night it's my fault. So when am I going to make your 'hated" list?
    "Do not touch the trim"

  38. #38
    "Its All Good"
    Reputation: Whafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    10,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Rivet
    Fo, is it raining where you are. Man I got up early to ride up to the top of Saddleback Mtn from my house and it friggin started raining on me...hard. Had to work all day yesterday and my day off I get rained on, sweet. I washed my car last night it's my fault. So when am I going to make your 'hated" list?
    Get out and ride in the rain man, it is only water. I ride if it persisting, especially as you mention you only have the one day off. Once you are wet and except it, it is a blast............Get out there... ENJOY....
    The_Lecht_Rocks: whafe - cheeers - may i offer an official apology for the wagon wheeler "dis-belief"

  39. #39
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by Whafe
    Get out and ride in the rain man, it is only water. I ride if it persisting, especially as you mention you only have the one day off. Once you are wet and except it, it is a blast............Get out there... ENJOY....
    Out here a little rain turns the dirt to clay, a major buzzkill and a bike killer.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  40. #40
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Clay is funn wheeeeeee
    Attached Images Attached Images

  41. #41
    CURB HUCK!!!!!!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    495
    that's such a sweet looking bike man, awesome awesome looking ride
    looks like a chopper kinda
    Kona Coiler

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Bike path queen....

    Hey Rivet,

    OK man... I would not talk about bike paths if I were you, I grew up riding in OC (14 yrs), and now I ride technical terrain. In the last 7 years I have transformed as a rider coming from OC. Most of those trails I could descend with my eyes closed on a fully rigid single speed (at flank speed).

    Don't get me wrong there are some rides I still love and are very sweet, and once and a while I make my way back with some Friends to ride them.

    But you know what its really all about...
    Fellowship with good Friends, enjoying the outdoors, blasting down some sweet single track, and getting away from the rat race to recharge your batteries...

    Enjoy the ride...

  43. #43
    Neg reppers r my biatches
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,250
    Quote Originally Posted by Rivet
    Fo, is it raining where you are. Man I got up early to ride up to the top of Saddleback Mtn from my house and it friggin started raining on me...hard. Had to work all day yesterday and my day off I get rained on, sweet. I washed my car last night it's my fault. So when am I going to make your 'hated" list?
    I dont want to talk about it! I got ZERO rides in this weekend.....i am becoming an even more girly man which sucks. hopefully though get a few rides in during the week on lunch break and then off to Alaska for 10 days the following weekend.

  44. #44
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    I dont want to talk about it! I got ZERO rides in this weekend.....i am becoming an even more girly man which sucks. hopefully though get a few rides in during the week on lunch break and then off to Alaska for 10 days the following weekend.
    I just became your best friend, i hope you didnt forget my address to send the Salmon to buddy.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    watch it dude, my mom uses stans rotors

    Thats not what she was using the other night...

  46. #46
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: coldsteele's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,282
    Gripshift is better then any thumb or finger shifty thingy except maybe X9's (which are only comparable to twist).

    But what about the monkey SL? I ride the XC and think the SL would be too light for any serious riding. Oh yea and least 185 in front.
    $.02
    Team MOJO Wheels.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    235
    i dont like the paint scheme and why would you need a floating brake, do vpp's brake jack now? not trying to hate just giving my honest opinion..

  48. #48
    CURB HUCK!!!!!!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by carnetorta
    why would you need a floating brake, do vpp's brake jack now?
    vpp is supposed to improve on keeping the suspension active during braking but I don't think anything is perfect, the floating brake would just eliminate it all together. and kinda looks cool
    Kona Coiler

  49. #49
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    vpp is supposed to improve on keeping the suspension active during braking but I don't think anything is perfect, the floating brake would just eliminate it all together. and kinda looks cool
    Xtra weight is cool

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    235

    ..

    Quote Originally Posted by umbertom
    vpp is supposed to improve on keeping the suspension active during braking but I don't think anything is perfect, the floating brake would just eliminate it all together. and kinda looks cool
    i suppose, although ive never heard of a vpp bike exhibiting brake jack, maybe im wrong tho

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    i dont like the paint scheme

    Good thing its not your bike... For what my bike costs you could buy three different color specalized enduro's. OH wait you probably can't afford it or you would be riding a high end bike....

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    235
    not the sworks enduro ...im sorry, but grip shifts and a six inch rotor in front on an am bike is not my idea of pimp..

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Xtra weight blah blah blah....

    You know I continue to be amazed at how many biiatches are on this mtbr program. I find it bewildering and interesting that even when the REAL professional engineers who have done actual engineering, data acquisition, and science and they UNDERSTAND the engineering and science come on and state the true scientific findings, you biiatches think your feelings mean more than the professionals science. Like that other thread going on about Nomad linkage and people going blah blah blah... Then some one comes on who actually knows what the **** he's talking about (a professional in the industry, not some little sniveling mtbr punk biiiatch) and shuts them up! Finally a little retribution from so many of these twits...

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    not the blah blah blah................

    ooooooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhh specalized s wurx...

  55. #55
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,380
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    Good thing its not your bike... For what my bike costs you could buy three different color specalized enduro's. OH wait you probably can't afford it or you would be riding a high end bike....
    Dude, step away from the keyboard, you are showing signs of a forum meltdown.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    meltdown.....

    The meltdown has already taken place in many of these snivaling peons brains. It amazes me how many top notch frame design, suspension design, shock design, brake design, this that and the other supposed "experts" are floating around these polluted mtbr waters.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crank1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,728

    Good job!

    This has become an ...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,624
    Not sure why some people are turning their noses up about gripshifts. Maybe it's due to their childhood experiences of cheapo supermarket specials! I've used X9 triggers and X9 gripshifts and I much prefer the gripshifts. I find them much quicker to downshift in a hurry, less prone to crash damage and they never seem to stick or miss gears. They weigh a little less too, although that's not a big deal. I think gripshifts are ideal for AM use, but the triggers are good too, so it's just personal preference.

    Personally I wouldn't trust an SL carbon bar on my AM rig, but then I'm 200 lbs fully kitted and I fall off too often!

    Let us know how you get on with the floating caliper setup and aluminium discs.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  59. #59
    "Its All Good"
    Reputation: Whafe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    10,697
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    The meltdown has already taken place in many of these snivaling peons brains. It amazes me how many top notch frame design, suspension design, shock design, brake design, this that and the other supposed "experts" are floating around these polluted mtbr waters.
    dhinkey..... Dude, let it go, go back and read my post, dont react to these balloon prickers, it is all tall poppy syndrome.............. The more you answer back the more they know it gets at you.................... You have a great ride, these a young fulla´s that havnt worked like you have to purchase a new bike, so becasue they cant have one, they cant be proud of you for working to get one.......................Its not worth it, you are so becoming the victum here...........

    Always remember, these spoons on the one dimensional internet would make you laugh in a face to face discussion. It is simple to let fly over the net, real simple, we cant get to them, so these folk let fly........ In the end, ITS YOUR BIKE, have it how you please...
    The_Lecht_Rocks: whafe - cheeers - may i offer an official apology for the wagon wheeler "dis-belief"

  60. #60
    USB Rep'n
    Reputation: namaSSte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,399
    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Gots to love a floating brake on a VPP
    I have to admit, I was thinking the same thing.
    though hope is frail, it must prevail - Taj Weekes

    betam eh-wud-eh-HA-lehu y
    eh-nay Ityopia!

  61. #61
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    I've always used it.

    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    Not sure why some people are turning their noses up about gripshifts. Maybe it's due to their childhood experiences of cheapo supermarket specials! I've used X9 triggers and X9 gripshifts and I much prefer the gripshifts. I find them much quicker to downshift in a hurry, less prone to crash damage and they never seem to stick or miss gears. They weigh a little less too, although that's not a big deal. I think gripshifts are ideal for AM use, but the triggers are good too, so it's just personal preference.

    Personally I wouldn't trust an SL carbon bar on my AM rig, but then I'm 200 lbs fully kitted and I fall off too often!

    Let us know how you get on with the floating caliper setup and aluminium discs.
    Yeah, I've used Rapid Fire and SRAM paddle shifters, and I still go with GS. It's light, simple, and effective. I look at the shifters as purely a preferential thing...as long as they shift the gears...mine do.

  62. #62
    another bozo on the bus
    Reputation: washedup's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,243
    it is just a bike after all. one would think someone just threatened your symbol of manhood and self worth...oh wait....

  63. #63
    Oh, So Interesting!
    Reputation: davec113's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,334
    Sweet Bike, I plan on building a 30ish lb 6" bike when I graduate AND get that high paying job. I love my bike, but its probably not much more capable than what you've got, and its around 36 lbs. The 7" fork and 8" rotor are nice sometimes, but most of the time a lighter bike is a bigger advantage.

    I'd be interested in a review of the floating caliper, and how much of a difference it makes on that frame.

    If these guys are gettin' to ya, go out and buy a Reign 2, and I'll ride your Nomad. I can take the flak! Or we can trade, I've spent $3500 or so on my Giant AC since '02 (including buying it)... seems like a fair trade.
    .




    Strava: turn off your dork logger when you're not on sanctioned trails.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    This has become an ...

    Are you making fun of the many special people on mtbr...?

    That's not politically correct

  65. #65
    Motion activated
    Reputation: Steve71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    Not sure why some people are turning their noses up about gripshifts. Maybe it's due to their childhood experiences of cheapo supermarket specials! I've used X9 triggers and X9 gripshifts and I much prefer the gripshifts. I find them much quicker to downshift in a hurry, less prone to crash damage and they never seem to stick or miss gears.
    I like my triggers because I can hang on, brake and downshift at the same time. I could never figure out how to do this with gripshift.

    BTW dhinkey, nice bike. It is not a lot of people’s idea of a perfect 6x6 bike, but I'm sure you have your valid reasons for building it up like you have. I really like the Hopey
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  66. #66
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    You gimp.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    I like my triggers because I can hang on, brake and downshift at the same time. I could never figure out how to do this with gripshift.

    BTW dhinkey, nice bike. It is not a lot of people’s idea of a perfect 6x6 bike, but I'm sure you have your valid reasons for building it up like you have. I really like the Hopey
    Good gosh, man, even the trolls buying WalMart bikes with GS were able to figure out how to properly use them...sheeesh!

    LOL!...obviously I'm jerkin' your chain there. Yeah, really it just comes down to what works for a given rider who likes a given set of ergonomics. And for others, it's just what they started with, and what they feel comfortable with as they continue to ride. The one GS move that I did think was a total mistake on a "real" off road bike was the half-pipe. Regular GS works because you don't have to fully enclose the shifting portion of the grip to ride the bike in gnarly, technical terrain or to shift the mechanism. The half-pipe took up most of the grip, and you just couldn't get away from it when you needed or wanted to.

  67. #67
    hgs
    hgs is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    Gots to love a floating brake on a VPP
    when/why does this or doesn't this make sense?

  68. #68
    Meh.
    Reputation: XSL_WiLL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    17,509
    I don't think anybody here has really insulted your bike. dogonfr's comments are mostly sarcastic. Though I too wondered why you put a floater on a VPP bike. I haven't noticed much/any brakejack from any of the VPP frames that I've ridden. People are simply voicing their opinions. They are entitled to their opinions as you are entitled to yours.

    That being said, I've never been particularly fond of those Stans rotors. The coating on them can wear off pretty quickly (especially when you like the wet stuff). I'm currently trying a set of prototype lasercut aluminum rotors with organic and semi-organic pads. One set is 7000 series aluminum, and the other is 6000 series. The two are different thicknesses. The weight loss is nice, but aluminum has a lower friction coefficient, and regular metallic pads seem to be much too abrasive for them. I've pretty much only run them at races thus far.

    Grip Shift is cool in my book. I like my x9 (soon to be x0) trigger shifters, but I'm not opposed to running Grip Shift.

    If it works for you, great.

    You may need to grow some thicker skin. You have no idea the kind of flak SMT is getting in the DH/FR forum.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation: arandal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    176
    Nice bike! Makes me want to lighten my behemoth...my nomad weighs 35.5 lbs, apparently...but it has a rohloff (heavy), d321 rims (heavy), Z150 (heavy, about to be replaced with an 07 36 talas RC)...and other heavy things...i have a speedball also which I like....how do you like the hopey? (I realize there are plenty of opinions floating around but how do you like the hopey?)...anyways, enjoy your new ride...it looks great! I am jealous...where did your get titanium bolts etc from?
    don't believe everything you think.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    uktrailmonster

    Personally I wouldn't trust an SL carbon bar on my AM rig, but then I'm 200 lbs fully kitted and I fall off too often!

    Let us know how you get on with the floating caliper setup and aluminium discs.[/QUOTE]


    I do believe over the many years I have been around mtn bikes and the high end equipment, I have had several people in the industry explain to me how they test the carbon bars. They exceed more than a million cycles of testing, many many more cycles than aluminum bars can take. I personally know a pro record holding jumper for a German bike brand who only runs carbon bars.

    I have run the Stans rotors on my Ventana El Santemontes, then my Ventana X6 for years and have never had a problem. I do not have to deal with wet conditions, but when I have ridden them in wet conditions they have been fine. A few times they squealed like banshees.

    The bike is totally new to me so I am not willing to make any jugdements for a while. I have to feel one with the bike b4 I feel confident in making judgments.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    Nice bike! Makes me want to lighten my behemoth...

    Thanks for the props arandal... Its amazing how few people on mtbr can say something nice or positive about a fellas new bike he is excited to build and ride.

    The Ti and aluminum bolts can be had from a co. in San Diego, Ca. that specializes in hardware for sport and track motorcycles called Race Bolts... www.racebolts.com

    btw... That looks like a cool setup on your rear hub/drive train.

    Enjoy the ride

  72. #72
    Motion activated
    Reputation: Steve71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Yeah, really it just comes down to what works for a given rider who likes a given set of ergonomics. And for others, it's just what they started with, and what they feel comfortable with as they continue to ride. .
    What a wishy-washy answer .

    We have a lot of switchbacks where you need to haul down from 20-30mph to a near stop. Inevitably these are some of the rockiest, loosest rutted sections of trail (go figure ).

    With triggers I can modulate my brakes, hold on and my thumb is in a natural position to just click down the gears with out compromising my grip on the bar. Then I just have to pick the smoothest section of the braking zone to get a couple of turns on the cranks. With GS I have to change gears before I get on the brakes (and unless you know the trail you don’t always know when you need to brake), I also have to change my hand position to do this which compromises my grip on the bar. Or am I missing something?
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  73. #73
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    Where you grip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    What a wishy-washy answer .

    We have a lot of switchbacks where you need to haul down from 20-30mph to a near stop. Inevitably these are some of the rockiest, loosest rutted sections of trail (go figure ).

    With triggers I can modulate my brakes, hold on and my thumb is in a natural position to just click down the gears with out compromising my grip on the bar. Then I just have to pick the smoothest section of the braking zone to get a couple of turns on the cranks. With GS I have to change gears before I get on the brakes (and unless you know the trail you don’t always know when you need to brake), I also have to change my hand position to do this which compromises my grip on the bar. Or am I missing something?
    I think many people who don't like GS don't have their hands in the right place on the grip in nasty terrain, which either causes them to shift accidentally because they're fully gripping the shift portion of the two pieces, or they have their hands too far to the outside and can't shift when needed. The correct method is to keep the shifter portion of the grip just barely covered by your index finger and thumb and the rest of your hand over the outside portion of the grip. This allows you to shift the shifter with your index finger/thumb when needed but still keep a proper grip on the bulk of the bar. You're still keeping control of the bar with your index finger and thumb, but you can still reach your brake lever too. Most of time you're moving the shifter with that web part between your index finger and thumb. You don't need to grab the shifter like it was a baseball bat. Unless your shifter, cables, or derailleur is gummed up, worn out, the shifter should not take an excessive amount of force. Newer generation GS also has a spring assist which really smoothed out the shifting IMO. Later models also aren't perfectly round and have rubber bulges extending out just a little to help ease shifting even more. I still think most of it comes down to personal ergomonics. That's why we have 5 billion handlebar designs.

  74. #74
    get down!
    Reputation: cjh_mtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    325
    i love the bike but the white/red combo is awful. PLEASE get that thing powder coated... blue.

  75. #75
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    25,418
    I had 4 beers & it still sounds to complicated, TNC you have to much time on your riding side to be thinking about shifting, thumb, index, brake im lost.

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,340
    I've run a floater on a Schwinn Straight 6, a frame with terrible, exaggerated brake jack and it worked wonders for the bike. While the Nomad may stiffen slightly under braking it certainly isn't horrific but without actually trying a floater on it it's hard for me to say how much a difference there would be.

    lifetime Gripshift fan.
    2 wheels

  77. #77
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
    Reputation: scrublover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8,772
    i've got GS on both my rides, and i've not had any issues with braking/holding on/shifting all just fine. and i'm riding on those same front range trails, at keystone, long high up epics, tight and twisty fast and slow speed technical terrain. i also can't ever recall accidental shifting, other than a few times when getting used to them, years and years ago.

    i started using them when they first came out, when they only had one model.
    (shrug) i guess it depends on what you get used to.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    787

    gripshift retard

    I must say that I gave gripshifts several good long trials before ditching them permanently. To me it seems impossible to shift without either moving your fingers off the brake, sliding your hand in or out, or, at minimum, twisting your gripping fingers/wrist into an unnatural position. I just can't see how one can possibly move/twist their thumb and index finger without it affecting either their gripping position or the strength of your grip.

    Believe me, I tried and tried because the gripshifters look cool, are light, are VERY fast to shift, etc. I just couldn't take the compromised grip, inability to do three things at once, and accidental shifts on every other bunnyhop or jump.

    They also don't work too well if you like to set your brakes up for one-finger braking. With Sram triggers, I can hang on with three fingers while covering the brake and shifting up or down at will. All without shifting my hand around the least little bit.

  79. #79
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
    Reputation: scrublover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8,772
    Quote Originally Posted by heavyg
    I must say that I gave gripshifts several good long trials before ditching them permanently. To me it seems impossible to shift without either moving your fingers off the brake, sliding your hand in or out, or, at minimum, twisting your gripping fingers/wrist into an unnatural position. I just can't see how one can possibly move/twist their thumb and index finger without it affecting either their gripping position or the strength of your grip.

    Believe me, I tried and tried because the gripshifters look cool, are light, are VERY fast to shift, etc. I just couldn't take the compromised grip, inability to do three things at once, and accidental shifts on every other bunnyhop or jump.

    They also don't work too well if you like to set your brakes up for one-finger braking. With Sram triggers, I can hang on with three fingers while covering the brake and shifting up or down at will. All without shifting my hand around the least little bit.
    meh, all i can say is that there are plenty of us using them, that don't seem to have any of those issues, riding all sorts of ugly terrain.

    i tried triggers on my last bike build, and hated them. swapped back to twisties after 3 or 4 rides.

    like nearly every other component choice, it comes down to personal preference.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  80. #80
    Student
    Reputation: [CrazyRick_11]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    821
    thats an intense build, how do u like the nomad frame?
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  81. #81
    Shamisen Appreciator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,905

    TA details

    I'm late to the thread, but I noticed what would appear to be a psuedo TA on the king. Make with the details. How did you get it to work with the floating brake and wider spacing? The first few pics don't appear to show a proper TA on there. What did you do? Machine up some longer funbolts and spacers to make a flange? Bore through the HD King axle to make room for a proper TA (which would still require a wider spaced hub right?)

    Details...
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles LLC
    flickr :: www.vertigocycles.com

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    787

    I am the retard, I think

    scrublover-

    It may not sound like it, but in all honesty I am trying to understand how/why it works so well for so many folks. Mainly trying to figure out whether my style/terrain is not well suited for it, or maybe it's my one finger braking, or maybe I just don't understand some subtle part of the technique or setup.

    If you've only tried to get used to one set of triggers on 3-4 rides, then I would say you haven't really given it a good try. I have used Shimano triggers and Sram triggers of variuous flavors including rapid rise more times than I can count. And I used gripshifts for at least 30 rides in various stints before I gave up.

    Please help me learn.

    Oh yeah, one other thing I had problems with- keeping my grips from spinning and falling off. I suppose one needs to use lock-ons with gripshift, another compromise in my mind.

  83. #83
    Me hates pinchflat
    Reputation: 545cu4ch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,415
    Quote Originally Posted by XSL_WiLL
    You may need to grow some thicker skin. You have no idea the kind of flak SMT is getting in the DH/FR forum.
    Hahaha, thats true
    Quote Originally Posted by sriracha
    "jesus would huck it"
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i have found the 1.5" headtubes to be slightly larger in diameter than 1 1/8", plus or minus

  84. #84
    Motion activated
    Reputation: Steve71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    I think many people who don't like GS don't have their hands in the right place on the grip in nasty terrain, which either causes them to shift accidentally because they're fully gripping the shift portion of the two pieces, or they have their hands too far to the outside and can't shift when needed. The correct method is to keep the shifter portion of the grip just barely covered by your index finger and thumb and the rest of your hand over the outside portion of the grip. This allows you to shift the shifter with your index finger/thumb when needed but still keep a proper grip on the bulk of the bar. You're still keeping control of the bar with your index finger and thumb, but you can still reach your brake lever too. Most of time you're moving the shifter with that web part between your index finger and thumb. You don't need to grab the shifter like it was a baseball bat. Unless your shifter, cables, or derailleur is gummed up, worn out, the shifter should not take an excessive amount of force. Newer generation GS also has a spring assist which really smoothed out the shifting IMO. Later models also aren't perfectly round and have rubber bulges extending out just a little to help ease shifting even more. I still think most of it comes down to personal ergomonics. That's why we have 5 billion handlebar designs.

    So if I'm getting this correctly, you hold on with your pinky and ring finger, brake with your middle finger and use you thumb & index finger to sort of ratchet the GS while you're braking?

    I had an old X-ray GS and it required a lot of force to get it to move. I can see that with a system that rotated very, very easily you could do it all without a baseball grip (or in my case cricket bat grip ).
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  85. #85
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rjpstoked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    347

    New question here. May you post some info on floater brake?

    Where (is it a brake therapy set up?). Whats the weight? Can it be set up with a 140mm? Laslty, can it work with 2 different wheelsets...Like my CK ISO/ Sapim CP xray/819 all mountian set and what ever my new xc set might be (seriously thinking extralite ultra spd disc hubs/ w/ceramic hybrids cp xrays/ and havent decided on rim or I9s). I have been given it seriuos though and my 4 bar rear end prob that I wish I could smooth out. I never get enough time down hill to be confident an prob brake too much making probs worse. Thanks

  86. #86
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    Think about this...

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve71
    So if I'm getting this correctly, you hold on with your pinky and ring finger, brake with your middle finger and use you thumb & index finger to sort of ratchet the GS while you're braking?

    I had an old X-ray GS and it required a lot of force to get it to move. I can see that with a system that rotated very, very easily you could do it all without a baseball grip (or in my case cricket bat grip ).
    Maybe you bicycle guys are incapable of mult-itasking...LOL!...again, just joking. Coming from a dirt motorcycle background where you have a throttle and front brake to contend with, I found it very easy to operate a GS and a front brake. Yeah, that "ratchet" comparison is a decent explanation...at least as far as those extreme situations where you're trying to shift, brake, and grip the bar all at the same time. You know...when you think about trying to verbalize this, it does indeed sound very complicated. When you're actually riding, it's just inherently natural and second nature...like riding and operating clipless pedals. Oh yeah...GS has improved a great deal since X-Ray models.

  87. #87
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RIDE OR DIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    213
    NIce Nomad and Bling project builds, can't wait to see the finished product and the funny thing is I'm not into AM yet! It does look like a well thought out plan on your current build let me know how it rides. What type of frame is that? AND FOR THE HATERS: RIDE YOUR OWN DAMN BIKE AND SHUT UP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  88. #88
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RIDE OR DIE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by RIDE OR DIE
    NIce Nomad and Bling project builds, can't wait to see the finished product and the funny thing is I'm not into AM yet! It does look like a well thought out plan on your current build let me know how it rides. What type of frame is that? AND FOR THE HATERS: RIDE YOUR OWN DAMN BIKE AND SHUT UP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    IF STUPIDITY WAS PAINFUL.....THERE WOULD BE LESS OF IT. SCR

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,624
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    I do believe over the many years I have been around mtn bikes and the high end equipment, I have had several people in the industry explain to me how they test the carbon bars. They exceed more than a million cycles of testing, many many more cycles than aluminum bars can take. I personally know a pro record holding jumper for a German bike brand who only runs carbon bars.
    Too many reports of broken ones in the reviews for my liking. No way are they tougher than the good old EA70.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CRAZY FRED's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,676

    Question About Easton Bars

    Quote Originally Posted by coldsteele
    Gripshift is better then any thumb or finger shifty thingy except maybe X9's (which are only comparable to twist).

    But what about the monkey SL? I ride the XC and think the SL would be too light for any serious riding. Oh yea and least 185 in front.
    $.02
    First off I have xo thumb shifters and there insane but I may be switching to grip shift,there alot lighter way cheaper and work as good if not better. I'm building a new bike and am going with alot of carbon. You comented on the Monkey SL and said you ride the XC is there a big difference?and what's the best(if such a thing)carbon products,for example I'm on either Race Face next sl or xc fsa k-forcexc or dh. and of course Easton sl or xc.I'm building a 6.6 and I'm going for a very light bike. This is not and will not be my go big bike,I have a bike for that and It's ready for ANYTHING. The 6.6 is a long legged xc bike FOR ME SAVE YOUR COMMENTS. anyway back to the carbon is one better than the other?and will all of those bars take 2 -5 foot drops IF HAD TWO NOT EVERY DAY ALL DAY.thanks for your help.

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    The first few pics don't appear to show a proper TA on there.

    Please define a "proper" TA...

  92. #92
    Shamisen Appreciator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,905
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    Please define a "proper" TA...
    "Proper" = Commonly used, readily available, standard.

    For some reason I assumed you were using the Heavy Duty axle from King. "Some reason" being that I find it difficult to believe that their standard axle could be modded to accept a Thru Axle. So, with that assumption, and knowing that the King HD axle is threaded, I'm curious to know how you came up with a Thru Axle for it and how you got the required spacing to fit in the bike (making yet another assumption that it's not a standard 135mm spacing.
    I'm not terribly creative at times, and to boot, I'm certainly not a machinist. You're obviously not using the funbolts that come with the HD axle. So, I figure maybe you did one of the following...

    1. Orderd a tandem hub from King with the rear spacing you'd need for this bike. Chuck the axle up on a lathe and turn the inside to enable fitment of a "proper" 12mm TA.

    or 2. Use some grade 8 bolts from the hardware store that use the same 10x1mm threading as the King HD axle. With spacers and aluminum sleeves...yadda yadda yadda, make it fit.

    or 3. Jimmy a standard threaded axle into the interior of the King HD axle and use nylock bolts to hold the whole shebang together.

    Off the top of my head, that's what I got. Interested in what you came up with. It looks like a sweet bike and I'm always impressed when people come up with creative and elegant solutions to making stuff work how they want it to work.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles LLC
    flickr :: www.vertigocycles.com

  93. #93
    jbf
    jbf is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jbf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    302
    I run GS because it works for me. The funny thing about GS is that the best shifters are not the current models. The new ones are big and take up too much space on the bar due to the goofy gear indicator window that SRAM thinks we need. The old ones do not have this window, work as good as the current models and are more compact, which allows better placement of the brake levers.

    I bought a set of 5.0 grip shift shifters a few years back at icycles for $15 and they are way better than the current X.0 models in my book. I use them with an X.0 derailleur and the combo is perfect. I needed another set recently - went to Ebay and picked up older NOS 7.0 shifters to run on my upgraded hardtail, and they are great too!

    My advise to GS lovers is to buy up a supply of the older shifters while they are still available ...

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    For some reason I assumed you were using the Heavy Duty axle from King

    Well I have had some feed back on the King set up that was not so favorable... The setup I am running is from Brake Therapy, they modify your hub to take a 10mm TA (certain frames and hubs can be done in 12mm) with standard spacing. They offer an aluminum or grade 8 steel TA. I am working on a TI axle to replace my steel. Brian tells me the aluminum is not good for people who plan on taking the wheel on and off frequently. I think it is a very well crafted setup, and is stiff as all hell...

  95. #95
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    682

    NIce ride...

    I'm a little surprsied by all the flak on the build...hell, it's alot nicer than any bike I've ever owned, that's for sure!

    I also run 6" rotors on my Heckler, and I have never had a bit of problems with a lack of stopping power. Like you, though, I tend to concentrate on being smooth, carrying momentum, and flowing with the trail. I've actually got a set of 8" rotors that I have never gotten around to swapping in there...just haven't needed them.

  96. #96
    Motion activated
    Reputation: Steve71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    3,214
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    Maybe you bicycle guys are incapable of mult-itasking...LOL!...again, just joking. Coming from a dirt motorcycle background where you have a throttle and front brake to contend with, I found it very easy to operate a GS and a front brake. Yeah, that "ratchet" comparison is a decent explanation...at least as far as those extreme situations where you're trying to shift, brake, and grip the bar all at the same time. You know...when you think about trying to verbalize this, it does indeed sound very complicated. When you're actually riding, it's just inherently natural and second nature...like riding and operating clipless pedals. Oh yeah...GS has improved a great deal since X-Ray models.
    Now it is starting to make sense. Good point on the moto throttle as well. I guess that X-Ray left me with a very bad impression of GS, because there was just no way to rotate it while braking (too much effort for one finger/thumb).
    Happiness is a warm 2 stroke.

  97. #97
    the goose is loose!
    Reputation: rm_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,276
    is that a steering stabilizer on that bike?! i see a post connected around the head tube, looks like the setup i have on my motorcycle.

  98. #98
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    93
    Quote Originally Posted by dhinkey
    The meltdown has already taken place in many of these snivaling peons brains. It amazes me how many top notch frame design, suspension design, shock design, brake design, this that and the other supposed "experts" are floating around these polluted mtbr waters.
    You're such a *****. As soon as anyone says ANYTHING remotely off-centered from what you're expecting you freak. Big deal, you built a bike…here's $5.00, go buy yourself some friends and a personality.

    I don't care what you think you know of bike technology, engineering, etc., that floating brake is totally unnecessary on the VPP design. You're nothing more than a middle mangement geek with too much cash.

    Cheers.

  99. #99
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    is that a steering stabilizer on that bike?

    Yes, it's a Hopey. You can see their website @ www.Hopey.com. I weighed mine on a gram scale, if I remember correctly it was about 180 grams b4 cutting it down. So far I am enjoying it, I feel much smoother and more stable in higher speed turns, cornering off camber, and going across ruts. It is adjustable with a knob right on the top. I have messed with my settings and am running it almost full on. I really don't notice it while I am riding. But already when I get on a buddies rig and screw around it feels weird w/o the damper, to loose, wiggly, almost sketchy...

  100. #100
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    62

    :incazzato: here's $5.00, go buy yourself some...

    Hey there mr. ski lift weenie, mr turner horst link is the best, no wait, its not the best. In case your struggling with the concept of personal finances $5.00 will barely buy you a gallon of gas, and not much else...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •