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  1. #1
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    Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    Historically forks with travel adjust are not as smooth or plush as non-travel adjust, with all the valving. They tend to be more problematic also, more parts to go wrong.

    BUT it would be nice to have the front end lowered for more comfortable climbing on a bike with a slack HA.

    So has anyone ridden both the SO and 2P Pike's and can offer some comparison?

    Thanks.
    We Ride In God's Country!

  2. #2
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    Re: Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    I had a lyrik solo air 170mm, mission control no floodgate for more than a year. I recently had it rebuilt due to creaky stancions, RS replaced uppers turning my fork into 160/130mm dp air, mission control with floodgate.

    I gotta tell Ya, I miss my old fork! My biggest complaint is that I feel it bottoming out when it really doesn't bottom out.
    I'm not sure what is causing that bottoming out feeling, but I miss my solo air!

    I may go coil to, but my air was just fine.

    I'm in the camp of, if a fork does many things, it does none of them very well.



    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    I'm also interested to hear any feedback on this and whether the Charger damper is affected negatively by the Dual Position Air.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by innovator8 View Post
    I'm in the camp of, if a fork does many things, it does none of them very well.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk
    Amen to that! Couldn't agree more...
    Last edited by Max24; 03-02-2015 at 09:00 PM.

  5. #5
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    I heard that the Dual Position have more unsprung weight and aren't as buttery smooth.

  6. #6
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    i have what used to be just a lyrik R. i swapped out all internals, dual position, dual flow rebound, and mission control DH. the fork rocks for anything i throw at it. and when the trail points up i can switch the flip and have a more comfortable climb. to me rock shox has the dual position dialed in and it doesnt create any adverse riding characteristics.

    with that said, a friend went from a fox 34 talas 140 to the new pike dual position 150 on a niner wfo and has loved it.
    Juice

  7. #7
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    Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    +1 ^^ My DPA Lyrik is so buttery smooth even after 2 years with NO servicing, just lubed and clean stanchions after EVERY ride. (I have added 30ml per side lower lube though)

    deano

  8. #8
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    Re: Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    Quote Originally Posted by deanopatoni View Post
    +1 ^^ My DPA Lyrik is so buttery smooth even after 2 years with NO servicing, just lubed and clean stanchions after EVERY ride. (I have added 30ml per side lower lube though)

    deano
    Which mission control damper do you have? With floodgate or without?

    The only issue I have is it sometimes gives the feeling of bottoming out when it actually doesn't on big drops.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    Quote Originally Posted by innovator8 View Post
    Which mission control damper do you have? With floodgate or without?

    The only issue I have is it sometimes gives the feeling of bottoming out when it actually doesn't on big drops.

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk
    It's a RC2L with mission control damper. Has the lockout too which I planned to remove if I was ever not happy with the small bump performance, but it has not ever been a problem. Actually having the lockout is good for long flat climbs on the road to a trail head. The only negative to owning a Lyrik is that no other fork will equal it IMO. 2010 Revelation was crap, 2012 SID is okay, 2006 Reba was good, 2012 Lyrik is amazing. (I'm not interested in Fox as I am bad at maintenance)

  10. #10
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    Any feedback from people who actually have a Pike?
    "The future belongs to those that believe in the beauty of their dreams."

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanopatoni View Post
    It's a RC2L with mission control damper. Has the lockout too which I planned to remove if I was ever not happy with the small bump performance, but it has not ever been a problem. Actually having the lockout is good for long flat climbs on the road to a trail head. The only negative to owning a Lyrik is that no other fork will equal it IMO. 2010 Revelation was crap, 2012 SID is okay, 2006 Reba was good, 2012 Lyrik is amazing. (I'm not interested in Fox as I am bad at maintenance)
    Cool cool cool, so do you ever do any large drops? 4 to 6 feet?

    It is only here that I sometimes feel that the fork bottoms out when it has an inch or two left.

    Thanks,

    Jeff

  12. #12
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    I don't have any experience with the Pike, but i thought i'd mention--i have a Revelation dual position and i am also aware of the problems with the dual position. I noticed the other day that you can purchase the "dual air" internals on ebay for pretty cheap ($70). My plan is to enjoy the dual position while it lasts, and if it causes problems i'll just convert it to a dual air. Might be you could do something similar with the Pike...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain spaulding View Post
    Any feedback from people who actually have a Pike?
    I have a Pike 150mm Solo Air, 26". Did not try the DP. However, I did replace my 2012 Fox CTD 32mm 150/120mm Talas. Pike is a giant step above the Fox. Smoother, stiffer on off-angle hits, just now breaking in after 7-8 rides. went with less psi then recommended, use all of the 150mm. I also changed the stem from 90mm to 50mm, making low speed tech stuff much easier. I notice no problems climbing, same performance as Fox. I never did use the 120mm setting on the Fox, not worth the hassle to change for the trails I ride. Pike is also 50 gms lighter, not bad for 35mm vs 32mm stanchion.

    dave
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  14. #14
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    I haven't ridden an SO Pike yet other than a few pushes in the parking lot, but I was pretty stoked about my new DA Pike on the first ride. It feels at least as plush as my Lyrik SO and I felt like I used a good amount of travel for the ride. I haven't taken it off any drops yet though so I can't really comment about bottom out on bigger hits.

    The bike I put it on is going to be my "epic ride" bike, and there usually ends up being a fair bit of climbing on those rides so I chose the DA. It is by far the easiest travel adjust I've owned (both U-turn coil and air). It feels very solid and is very quick to adjust. Time will tell about durability though. It's modular though, so if it poops out on me, I will just switch to an SO spring. I figured it was worth a try to go DA and my initial opinion is very good.

  15. #15
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    I don't have any issues with my dpa Lyrik. It's my favorite fork, behind the Avy tuned Marz 888 from my Jedi. I've only parking lot tested a new Pike solo air, but couldn't discern any advantage, plushness wise.
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  16. #16
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    Pike SO vs Dual Position?

    Quote Originally Posted by innovator8 View Post
    Cool cool cool, so do you ever do any large drops? 4 to 6 feet?

    It is only here that I sometimes feel that the fork bottoms out when it has an inch or two left.

    Thanks,

    Jeff
    I only do drops up to 4ft, but not often. No bottom out issues here.
    Deano

  17. #17
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    I've got two rides in now and couldn't be happier with this fork! I adjusted my fun meter a lot on this ride and I am using A LOT of travel on small to medium size bumps. However, I didn't ever feel a harsh bottom out when throwing it down some crazy lines or on small ~3' drops. I don't ever intend for this to be a huck bike so that fits perfectly with my expectations.

    One of my buddies had his SO Pike on this ride and I thought mine felt a lot more plush. He is using more pressure and less low speed than I am so this makes sense. It's nice that the Pike has the adjustability to ride however the owner wants it to. For me, I want it to be as plush as possible and my DA Pike delivers! Riding this fork makes me want to spend a little more time dialing on my Lyrik.

    The only drawback is that I almost went OTB a few times because my weight was too forward on techy climbs and the fork dived more than I was expecting. I will need to learn to compensate a little I guess.

  18. #18
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    One question, did you use full travel?

    I had my wrench convert a solo totem into a dual position and find it almost impossible to use the last inch of travel. I have fooled with every setting on my mission control, floodgate, rebound, air, oil level, etc and no dice yet. The force required on the last inch is pretty colossal.

    I'm really leaning towards the solo Pike for my new nomad build as I'd like to use every inch of travel on my trail bike.

  19. #19
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    I RARELY ever used full travel on my coil Totem--it seemed to really ramp up at the end of the stroke. The only way I could use all the travel was with the light spring and no compression, but that was too divey so I went back to the medium. I guess what I'm saying is that it might not be the DA that was causing your Totem to not bottom out. I was never really in love with that fork.

    I regularly get full travel (on two rides of experience) with my Pike DA. If I were doing a trail with more drops, I would probably air it up a little more, but I haven't noticed a hard bottom out despite rolling down some pretty interesting lines.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by captain spaulding View Post
    Any feedback from people who actually have a Pike?
    The Pike Solo Air is amazing... First ride it felt so good I literally started riding lines I wouldn't have tried before. I am sure the Dual Air is great too but I simply dropped my stem 10mm(since this photo) and called it a day... I think it's the first matte black & organge Bronson I have seen with a White Pike. I really like it:

    Pike SO vs Dual Position?-bronson-pike-1.jpg

  21. #21
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    @kristian:

    I am in a similiar situation as you as I build up a bike that I will use for multi-day tours in the swiss + italian alps (quite some steep climbs there), so I guess would be good to have adjustable travel. Do you have any issues in the meantime with your dual position? Did I understand you correctly that the dual position is actually convertable to a "normal" solo position in case that it proves unreliable?

  22. #22
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    The SA and DPA are not interchangeable. A SA fork has a dimple on the inner tube to allow negative pressure in its chamber. The DPA achieves the negative air pressure in a different way. So no mixing of the two. The DPA has one additional seal and may add a very minimal amount of friction, you'd never know! Very plush and the DPA works well and very reliable, a very simple system.

  23. #23
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    My 2013 camber comp Geo is supposedly only good for a fork with 120 mm of travel. Do you think the pike could be used in the 120 mode and only use the 150mm for decents? Or does the different Geo really stress the frame that much?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllMountaineer View Post
    The Pike Solo Air is amazing... First ride it felt so good I literally started riding lines I wouldn't have tried before. I am sure the Dual Air is great too but I simply dropped my stem 10mm(since this photo) and called it a day... I think it's the first matte black & organge Bronson I have seen with a White Pike. I really like it:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I didn't know you could get the Pike Solo Air in white.
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  25. #25
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    Sorry I missed your reply! The only "issue" I've had is the fork packing on climbs twice (down to about 20mm of travel). It's only on smooth road climbs that this has happened, and it was fine again on the descent. I'm still very happy with the DH performance of the fork, and the climbing is good too.

    @ Ethan, I'm almost certain that you can take all of the spring guts out of a DP and convert to a Solo (buying new Solo guts). If not, Rock Shox would have to build a separate lower and/or upper assembly for each version, and that's not like the way they usually do things. I could be wrong though. As of yet I have no reason to explore that option further.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian View Post
    Sorry I missed your reply! The only "issue" I've had is the fork packing on climbs twice (down to about 20mm of travel). It's only on smooth road climbs that this has happened, and it was fine again on the descent. I'm still very happy with the DH performance of the fork, and the climbing is good too.

    @ Ethan, I'm almost certain that you can take all of the spring guts out of a DP and convert to a Solo (buying new Solo guts). If not, Rock Shox would have to build a separate lower and/or upper assembly for each version, and that's not like the way they usually do things. I could be wrong though. As of yet I have no reason to explore that option further.
    Is in the DPA you can use the Multiple Tokens Bottomless progressiveness as a change in SA.?
    Probably not. So if this can not miss?

  27. #27
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    I have Pike 160mm dual position 26er for 3 months, work perfect and super smooth

    there are my test ride in 1st day



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  28. #28
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    They are not interchangeable! The difference is in the leg itself, there is no "dimple" in the DPA version, hence the non interchangeability! So if you we're to assemble a SA shaft and its related guts, it would not get any negative air psi because its missing the dimple inside the leg. If you we're to install SA into DPA tubes things would not be good!

    In the DPA you cannot use the Tokens as there is an air shaft from the top cap.
    I have made our own, PM me if you'd like to get some, it does help imo.
    Or mavericksuspension@gmail.com
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan F View Post
    They are not interchangeable! The difference is in the leg itself, there is no "dimple" in the DPA version, hence the non interchangeability! So if you we're to assemble a SA shaft and its related guts, it would not get any negative air psi because its missing the dimple inside the leg. If you we're to install SA into DPA tubes things would not be good!

    In the DPA you cannot use the Tokens as there is an air shaft from the top cap.
    I have made our own, PM me if you'd like to get some, it does help imo.
    Or mavericksuspension@gmail.com
    So, whether dpa feel the lack of regulation of progressivity, or dpa works like are no tokens

  30. #30
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    Ok. I see the dimple you reference in picture #4 on page 18 of the service manual, but its on the shaft. If someone were to convert their fork to a solo air, that shaft and the rest of the spring assembly would basically be spare parts, and you would replace with a full solo air assembly. I searched briefly online and couldn't find that SO assembly, but I did find a full DPA assembly (for the bargain price of $229--ouch!). Still, I'm willing to bet that anyone with some spare $$, decent mechanical skills, and a 2014 Rock Shox parts catalog could convert either fork into the other flavor. Then again, I'm not a fork tech--I just play one on the Internet...

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan F View Post
    The SA and DPA are not interchangeable. A SA fork has a dimple on the inner tube to allow negative pressure in its chamber. The DPA achieves the negative air pressure in a different way. So no mixing of the two. The DPA has one additional seal and may add a very minimal amount of friction, you'd never know! Very plush and the DPA works well and very reliable, a very simple system.


    Quote Originally Posted by innovator8 View Post
    Cool cool cool, so do you ever do any large drops? 4 to 6 feet?

    It is only here that I sometimes feel that the fork bottoms out when it has an inch or two left.

    Thanks,

    Jeff

    I have a dpa pike 150 29 on my Ventana. Dropped the front end on a four foot natural drop with a weird rounded lip a couple weeks ago and went quite nose heavy on the landing. The fork saved me from a tumble, and no bottom out. That's with me at 260 and running it well below max psi...

  32. #32
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    The DPA has a slightly smaller air volume due to the added shaft inside, but i think it still needs more progression for bigger drops.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan F View Post
    The DPA has a slightly smaller air volume due to the added shaft inside, but i think it still needs more progression for bigger drops.
    Is it possible to somehow increase the progressivity of the dpa. Maybe adding more oil. If he was too weak. I like going fast but not a big drop. I weigh about 85 kg.
    Rather, it should be ok, but when you dive downhill I can not stand, and dpa on long climbs up would probably help me.
    So which one do you recommend

  34. #34
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    The Climb mode on the SA works very well, but will not lower the fork.
    We make Tokens specially for the DPA.
    Contact me at mavericksuspension@gmail.com if you'd like more info.

    I'm only 65-66 kg, and I use 2 Tokens!
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian View Post
    Ok. I see the dimple you reference in picture #4 on page 18 of the service manual, but its on the shaft. If someone were to convert their fork to a solo air, that shaft and the rest of the spring assembly would basically be spare parts, and you would replace with a full solo air assembly. I searched briefly online and couldn't find that SO assembly, but I did find a full DPA assembly (for the bargain price of $229--ouch!). Still, I'm willing to bet that anyone with some spare $$, decent mechanical skills, and a 2014 Rock Shox parts catalog could convert either fork into the other flavor. Then again, I'm not a fork tech--I just play one on the Internet...
    Sorry to dig up an old thread but did anybody ever come to a conclusion on the spring swap??

    Im looking to put my DPA spring from my 26" fork into a 27.5 SA I picked up..I was told it would work..Has anyone done it?? If not it looks like Ill have a 26 DPA and a 27.5 SA for sale haha

  36. #36
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    I ordered and fitted the DPA tokens from mavericksuspension, and my fork now finally plays very well - no bottom-out on drops, and plush on rocky and rooty trails at high speed. I am 90 kg and run 2 tokens, with air pressure quite a bit below recommendation for my weight.

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    How did the install go ? Easy?

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    I just finished the installation of a token in my DPA, took 5 minutes. Cake.

    I'm 205lbs, just put in 1 token for now to see how it behaves. Start the tuning process all over again....

    I'll be doing a ride Thursday morning for feedback.

  39. #39
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    I read a bunch of "I heard" and "everybody knows" comments about the Solo Air being superior to the Dual Position Air Pike .................................................. .................................................. ............................................ but only ever here in MTBR. And nothing remotely scientific in testing nature.


    Anybody got any solid information about this?
    I for one am delighted with the performance of my Dual Position, but I've never ridden it side by side with a Solo Air Pike on the exact same bike on the exact same trails.
    The only thing I can say conclusively is that the DPA prices seem to be fantastically lower right now, which could be because they suck, or because mob mentality has deemed them unfairly unworthy.
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  40. #40
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    I own both (although the solo is a 26 and the DP is a 29). I only use the one stock token in my Solo and nothing in the DP. I think both forks are awesome and it's hard for me to say the Solo is better than the DP. If you find a deal on a DP I wouldnt think twice about it.

  41. #41
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    Stumbled across this discussion a month or two ago and gave Ethan from Maverick Suspension a shout who fixed me up with the dual position tokens.

    I've had a couple of good rides using them and the DP Pikes now feel very good! I'm able to run about 15/ 20 psi less (my riding weight is about 75Kg, pressure is now 75psi), so small bump sensitivity is exactly how I like it and no harsh bottoming out.

    I've had these DP pikes for 16 months and they have never felt better!

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    I just finished with my forth ride on my new 29 DP 150/120 pike, which I fitted to a 2012 SJ FSR. The first 3 rides were a let down with the fork feeling harsh. I am 87 kg geared up and set it to 100 psi which was the low range guide on the fork with 5 clicks LSC and 5 clicks of RB from full slow.

    This last ride I set the sag to 25%, which only required 90 psi and is 15 psi lower then RS info. By the end of the ride I settled on 3-4 clicks LSC and 8 clicks of RB from full slow. The fork felt great both in high speed chatter/roots and slower rock gardens.

    Also, I use the lower setting often as the trails I ride are up and down all day. My head tube angle went from a stock 69 deg, to a 69.5 in 120 and 67 in 150. Thus climbing is a bit easier and the DH is all the more fun!

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  43. #43
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    Hey Guys, question for the DPA riders... how does the fork perform in the 120 mode? Does it ride like a regular 120 fork, with the same spring rate and damping performance as in the 150 mode just less travel and a steeper HA?

  44. #44
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    Hey Johnny,

    I've never ridden anything that is an extended DH with the fork in 120 mode (not sure why you would unless you forget to undo the DPA). It works fine enough for the bumps and roots you come across on a climb though. Its definitely more plush than my 100mm Reba in the 120mm mode. That being said, if your primary focus is. 120mm fork, I'd get a Solo air Pike and get a 120mm air shaft.

  45. #45
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    I put a Pike dual position on my Spitfire recently and I have about 10 rides on it. I'm still experimenting with air pressure and some adjustments but I find it not as smooth as I hoped on rapid, small impacts. At slower speeds I would like more small bump smoothness. On larger hits its very smooth and just feels perfect.

    I've never ridden a Pike w/o dual position but the Fox 34 CTD on my 29er has much better small bump sensitivity. I'm hoping this will get better as the fork gets used more and I dial in the low speed compression.
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    Ride in low mode.

    Quote Originally Posted by JFR View Post
    Hey Guys, question for the DPA riders... how does the fork perform in the 120 mode? Does it ride like a regular 120 fork, with the same spring rate and damping performance as in the 150 mode just less travel and a steeper HA?
    Hey JFR...

    My Tracer is supposed to be here this week (super stoked!) so I can't answer based personal experience but in my research, and talking to the RS rep, the low position on the DPA is not intended to be run downhill for extended time. It is intended use is to enhance climbing capabilities with some downs and rolling terrain mixed in. They told me to "not" run it in low mode for long downhills. That being said, I have heard from friends that do run it in low and dont think about it. They say it runs the same.

    I would love to hear feedback from anyone else regarding this.... esp. someone form Rock Shock. Here in the Front Range of CO, I will be riding in 160mm mode most of the time but depending on the trail, sometimes I would run the shock at 130mm. But again, it doesn't sound like its intended for this purpose. Ill be testing that theory soon and will report back!

    Cheers'

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFR View Post
    Hey Guys, question for the DPA riders... how does the fork perform in the 120 mode? Does it ride like a regular 120 fork, with the same spring rate and damping performance as in the 150 mode just less travel and a steeper HA?
    I can barely tell when i am trail riding, other then the added benefit of a faster easier turning bike. I do notice on the faster sections. Thats to be expected though. 30-40mm of travel is a fair bit.

    Edit i have the 160mm model.

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    I replaced my old Talas forks with a 26 150mm Pike solo air and I don't miss being able to lower the forks at all. It took a couple of rides to adjust to the height but after that it just felt better. My latest bike purchase came with 27.5 160mm Pike solo air forks and I think they work fine for long steep climbs. If I had purchased the next model bike in the range which came with DPA forks I don't think I would have ever used that feature and if I did would I would have issues with pedal strikes. I don't think there is a need for travel adjustable forks to be fitted to bikes but with maybe 29er bikes being the exception. They are more expensive and don't seem to perform as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeridaManiac View Post
    I can barely tell when i am trail riding, other then the added benefit of a faster easier turning bike. I do notice on the faster sections. Thats to be expected though. 30-40mm of travel is a fair bit.

    Edit i have the 160mm model.
    Cool. Thanks for the input.

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    Quote Originally Posted by erm2 View Post
    Hey JFR...

    My Tracer is supposed to be here this week (super stoked!) so I can't answer based personal experience but in my research, and talking to the RS rep, the low position on the DPA is not intended to be run downhill for extended time. It is intended use is to enhance climbing capabilities with some downs and rolling terrain mixed in. They told me to "not" run it in low mode for long downhills. That being said, I have heard from friends that do run it in low and dont think about it. They say it runs the same.

    I would love to hear feedback from anyone else regarding this.... esp. someone form Rock Shock. Here in the Front Range of CO, I will be riding in 160mm mode most of the time but depending on the trail, sometimes I would run the shock at 130mm. But again, it doesn't sound like its intended for this purpose. Ill be testing that theory soon and will report back!

    Cheers'
    Cool. Thanks for the input and feedback your friends have had.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian View Post
    Hey Johnny,

    I've never ridden anything that is an extended DH with the fork in 120 mode (not sure why you would unless you forget to undo the DPA). It works fine enough for the bumps and roots you come across on a climb though. Its definitely more plush than my 100mm Reba in the 120mm mode. That being said, if your primary focus is. 120mm fork, I'd get a Solo air Pike and get a 120mm air shaft.
    Hey Kristian - It's been awhile!

    I'm planning an Ibis Ripley build and considering the 120/150 DP Pike. The Ripley is designed around a 120 - 140 fork. The extra 10mm of the 150 would be great for big mountain riding and having fun on the descents. But I also ride some local flat, tight, twisty, rolling terrain, and have a local XC series where the 120 would be pretty much all I need, if not ideal the entire time.

    I like the idea of using the 120/150 for not just climbing/descending, but transforming the bike from XC machine to AM slayer, depending on ride location and purpose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFR View Post
    Hey Kristian - It's been awhile!

    I'm planning an Ibis Ripley build and considering the 120/150 DP Pike. The Ripley is designed around a 120 - 140 fork. The extra 10mm of the 150 would be great for big mountain riding and having fun on the descents. But I also ride some local flat, tight, twisty, rolling terrain, and have a local XC series where the 120 would be pretty much all I need, if not ideal the entire time.

    I like the idea of using the 120/150 for not just climbing/descending, but transforming the bike from XC machine to AM slayer, depending on ride location and purpose.
    Indeed it has! How have you been?

    I'm running my 150/120 Pike on a Norco Shinobi that was designed around a 140mm fork. This is actually the third Shinobi I've had (long story) and the first two had 140mm forks. I would honestly be hard pressed to say that there have been any negative handling traits from adding an extra 10mm of travel and I run the 150mm for pretty much everything except fireroads and crazy steep climbs. I use the RT3 a lot more actually than the DPA. For example, if it's a rolly singletrack with a little tech, I'll keep it in 150mm and set the damping to the middle position. If it's almost no tech, I'll "lock" the fork in the 150mm and rely on the threshold for accidental hits, and if it's really steep, I'll lock and use the DPA down to 120mm. I don't feel the need to drop down to 120 for most rolling climbs--that is coming from a big fan of the U-turn forks I had in the past which I frequently used.

    The nice thing about the DPA (after using many different flavors of U-turn) is that you can actually change the travel while you're riding if you have decent balance so I can bend over and flick it up or down on the fly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kristian View Post
    Indeed it has! How have you been?

    I'm running my 150/120 Pike on a Norco Shinobi that was designed around a 140mm fork. This is actually the third Shinobi I've had (long story) and the first two had 140mm forks. I would honestly be hard pressed to say that there have been any negative handling traits from adding an extra 10mm of travel and I run the 150mm for pretty much everything except fireroads and crazy steep climbs. I use the RT3 a lot more actually than the DPA. For example, if it's a rolly singletrack with a little tech, I'll keep it in 150mm and set the damping to the middle position. If it's almost no tech, I'll "lock" the fork in the 150mm and rely on the threshold for accidental hits, and if it's really steep, I'll lock and use the DPA down to 120mm. I don't feel the need to drop down to 120 for most rolling climbs--that is coming from a big fan of the U-turn forks I had in the past which I frequently used.

    The nice thing about the DPA (after using many different flavors of U-turn) is that you can actually change the travel while you're riding if you have decent balance so I can bend over and flick it up or down on the fly.
    I've been great, truly blessed, and I hope the same is true for you.

    Thanks for the additional feedback on your use of the DP and RT3. I've had Talas forks on my last 2 bikes and enjoyed the steeper HA for super steep or long climbs. Although I don't think it's been really necessary.

    I test rode a Ripley with a 120 fork and I liked the XC handling at that height. It also felt good descending, but the trails were pretty tame. I did get to repeat a super steep drop in a few times and it felt fine with just 120. I can only imagine how much better 140 or 150 would have been, and I know I'll want the additional travel for some of the riding I do after having only 120 on my last bike (a Pivot 429a).

    I was originally planning on a solo air 140, but after riding the Ripley with a 120 I started to think maybe it would be nice to have both, ala DPA. We'll see. I may end up just going with the 140 to keep things simple and a little lighter, especially after hearing your last feedback regarding the trail setting working so well.

    Thanks again.

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    I have both DPA & SA 160mm 27.5 Pikes. The SA has half a token in it. They ride indistingishably. The weight difference is 50 or 70g, can't remember. I like climbing better in the lowered position so my SA is up for sale.
    Keep the Country country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFR View Post
    I've been great, truly blessed, and I hope the same is true for you.
    Yes, beyond belief. It's been a crazy couple of years but I'm loving it!

    Quote Originally Posted by JFR View Post
    I may end up just going with the 140 to keep things simple and a little lighter, especially after hearing your last feedback regarding the trail setting working so well.
    Sounds like a winner to me. That will give you almost an inch of travel over the 120 you tried, and it will make your head angle a little more forgiving. I'm sure it will be a ripper like that!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fretwater View Post
    I just finished with my forth ride on my new 29 DP 150/120 pike, which I fitted to a 2012 SJ FSR. The first 3 rides were a let down with the fork feeling harsh. I am 87 kg geared up and set it to 100 psi which was the low range guide on the fork with 5 clicks LSC and 5 clicks of RB from full slow.

    This last ride I set the sag to 25%, which only required 90 psi and is 15 psi lower then RS info. By the end of the ride I settled on 3-4 clicks LSC and 8 clicks of RB from full slow. The fork felt great both in high speed chatter/roots and slower rock gardens.

    Also, I use the lower setting often as the trails I ride are up and down all day. My head tube angle went from a stock 69 deg, to a 69.5 in 120 and 67 in 150. Thus climbing is a bit easier and the DH is all the more fun!
    Wow...I was way off on my fork settings and was measuring sag incorrectly from the seated position for the fork instead of in the attach position. This is why the pressures I was measuring was way low compared to RS guide. I am 190 lbs geared up (86 kg) and RS recommends 115 psi and I was only putting in 90.

    I took Gman086's advice and started increasing the pressure and rebound settings and the fork took on a completely new feel. It now performs amazing in small bumps and in rocky chatter. The bike rides much faster since I am not wasting energy with the low pressure - high rebound damping settings. I exactly wiped two times within 5 minutes due to the new feel and higher speeds Plus the fork also rides much higher now and returns from low to high position while riding without having to unload.

    Note the DP recommended air pressure settings are much higher than the SA. I ended up with 115 psi, 4 clicks rebound from full fast, and I am still messing with LSC. The attack sag was 20% and seated was 12%. I also increased rebound on the Triad II rear shock from 1-2 to 6 from full slow per Fox's setup guide for my weight and that had a big effect as well. The bike basically just fly's over shit I use to get caught up in half the time.

    Question about LSC? What effect does the extreme settings do? It seemed as though I had more control and less diving in slow rocky stuff when it was dialed fully positive but I need to try it a few more times to get a good feel for it.

    12 SJ FSR COMP 29
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    Low speed compression has nothing to do with the speed of your bike; it has to do with the speed that the suspension moves while compressing. So low speed is relevant with "bigger" movements, like coming off a drop or landing a jump. Controlling dive during hard-progressive braking also applies here. If you are bottoming out a lot, then you would need to increased the low-speed compression. Conversely, if you are not using full travel (and your preload/sag is set properly), then you should try backing off the compression (turn adjuster counter clockwise) until you start to see full travel on the bigger hits. High speed compression occurs when hitting smaller obstacles, especially sharp edge rocks and roots, and the "chatter" type terrain. The high speed stuff is where you usually feel "harshness." Of course, nothing works totally independently, so you need to find the best combination of HSC, LSC, and rebound damping for best overall performance and comfort.

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    Uh...
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