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  1. #1
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    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try

    I am in search of new pedals to replace the stock ones that came with my stumpjumper fsr-comp 29. I have googled and youtube for the last hour or two and I am more lost than before I started.

    I am 100% new to MTB. Today was the first time I went for a mountain ride. Is there a dual purpose pedal that incorporates both? Should I buy a set of each and try? I have seen good and bad reviews for crank brothers mallets and shimano M985.

    What other ones do people use? So much to learn with this hobby

  2. #2
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    im eyeing these

    Race Face


  3. #3
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    check out spank spike, dmr vault and canfield crampon

  4. #4
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    Straitline defactos, best pedals ever made imo.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by glarior View Post
    Is there a dual purpose pedal that incorporates both?
    What do you mean by "both"?

    Are you wanting flat pedals? How much do you want to spend?

  6. #6
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    Right. Flats? Clipless? What style clipless? On a lark, I'll throw this out. I've been riding SPD's since....98? Maybe? - you'll have to pardon, my old memory grows hazy. I recently got tired of Shimano's premium pricing, and apparent decline in quality, but didn't really want to move away from SPD's since all 5 of my bikes have SPD pedals, and I really don't want to change pedals to whatever bike I'm riding. So I picked up a set of Xpedo pedals - SPD compatible, more float, lighter, supposedly higher quality, and much less expensive than equal Shimano pedals. So far, so good.

  7. #7
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    These work pretty good.

    <img src=http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8874&stc=1&d=112154860 7>

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  8. #8
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    Dam really? Ditch the flats. Shimano 540 SPDs.

  9. #9
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    Old clipless guy here. After about a 10 year break, I ended up trying the flats route for about a month and decided it just wasn't for me. I am now riding a bigger FS bike and doing some gravity fed riding which led me to the mallets by CB. They've got great float and give some feedback around the cleat to me through the flats. They are a bit heavier but I get the best of both worlds.
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  10. #10
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    i have a set of spank spikes on my rocky mtn and they are nice and wide and relatively thin.

    i did have an issue once where they cam apart on the trail, my buddy found the parts and i put it back together again on the fly and then disassembled and used loctite at home the next day.

    i also like the look of those flat irons from azonic, but have never seen them in person.

    now if only i could find a pair of shoes i really like locally.

  11. #11
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    I like pinned flats
    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try-img-20140308-00606.jpg

    I have about 350miles on these Forte Covert pedals. I can point my toes get full circle power easy sticks to my 5.10s like peanutbutter on bread....
    The new model is black, the grey is no more....Performance Bike carrys them..thin, light..hex bolt hole on the inside, comes with replacement pins..won't brake the bank....Not as SICK as thoes ^^^RaceFace^^ (me want!!) but they work great!
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  12. #12
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    Two pair of SPD compatible wellgo, one pair of shim M530, one pair of crank candy1 and finally one pair to rule them all: time MX6

  13. #13
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    I came here to post about the Forte's. I can't endorse them enough. I was looking for another pair of flats as my pair of "old reliables" finally seized up. I got these just to have something to ride until I could get my hands on something better. They stick to 5-10s like glue, they rotate just fine and don't cost an arm and a leg. Like Burt 4x4 said, you can get them at Performance Bikes either in store or on their website. I ended up picking mine up for $60. They are better than some $120 pedals I have had before. The only complaint about them is the hex nut pins and it's not a big problem. I'd rather have pins that are replaced through the bottom of the pedal instead of a hex nut. If I mangle a pin or two on the top, I don't want it to be a pain in the arse to replace it. If it's a hex nut, the carnage will usually mangle the part I need to get to to put the hex wrench in to get it out. Yeah, a pair of pliers will work, but I'd like to avoid that if I can. The funny thing about all this is that I haven't needed to fix any pins on these pedals at all yet after about a full season of riding. It's a moot point. Great pedals and may be one of the best bang for the buck deals on the market. Way better qualities than the Wellgo's I used to run.

  14. #14
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    I went with Azonic 420's for my new bike, got to try out a set a few weeks back. So many pedals IMO are are just personal preference, most of the spikes are the same , same grip, just pick the weight you want to pay for.

  15. #15
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    Fer sure MrMentallo ~ A few times I hit rock/ground/rock while pedaling..BOOM/SCRaappe all while thinking "I just F'ed up some pins on that one" ..later while inspecting.."WOW, they are all fine..WTF, COOL!!" Keep Riding!!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    What do you mean by "both"?

    Are you wanting flat pedals? How much do you want to spend?
    Price 0-200 I would guess. Pedals are cheap compared to the bike which makes me wonder why they even bother with plastic pedals when buying new.

    Is there a pedal that allows normal shoes to work then be able to use clip in shoes too?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMentallo View Post
    The only complaint about them is the hex nut pins and it's not a big problem. I'd rather have pins that are replaced through the bottom of the pedal instead of a hex nut. If I mangle a pin or two on the top, I don't want it to be a pain in the arse to replace it. If it's a hex nut, the carnage will usually mangle the part I need to get to to put the hex wrench in to get it out. Yeah, a pair of pliers will work, but I'd like to avoid that if I can.
    Hey MrMetallo and anyone else who cares and wants to know,

    If you have a pedal with top inserting screws, pins, hex, whatever...all you gotta do is get a small metal saw before they grind down to the pedal body and carve a small notch. Then a nice flathead screwdriver will take care of the rest. Can fix any pedal that way with top insert style pedals.
    Get out and ride even when you don't want to because ten minutes into the ride you'll be glad you did.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by glarior View Post
    Is there a pedal that allows normal shoes to work then be able to use clip in shoes too?
    There are a few pedals that offer/claim that. The Shimano PD-M324 that has the clip on one side. Shimano PD-M324 Pedals > Components > Pedals > Clipless Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    Shimano has a few others, but the ones I've tried (PD-M545) just isn't very comfortable with non-cleated shoes. Wellgo has the WPD-95B Wellgo WPD-95B Clipless/Clip Pedals > Components > Pedals > Clipless Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop which I haven't tried.

  19. #19
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    I've rode Azonic420's and Answer Rove's for years. Recently I rode a friends Prime which had Chromag Scarab's on it and liked them as well. All stuck well to my 5-10's well.

    I'm considering some new pedal's, my roves had a hard seaons last year. They arent shot but we all like fresh part's.
    I like to fart when I'm in front of you on a climb

  20. #20
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    Canfield Crampon Ultimates if you're going full flats. No question. Incredible grip, very comfortable, super thin, and incredibly strong. Best pedal out there, and worth every penny and more.

    If you go for clippy-platform hybrids, get the Mallet DH. Don't get the cheaper Mallets. They don't last. But be aware that even the DH Mallets do not grip remotely as well as real flats. They will get you by, but I found myself very nervous feeling when clipped out. The clip mechanism feels a bit like a roller under the ball of your foot. So I stayed in 99.9% of the time, negating the benefits of the platform. But in its own right, the Mallet DH is a very good pedal. The only Crank Brothers pedals I'd use. That egg beater mechanism is very nice to get into and out of in a hurry, and it clears mud like it wasn't even there.

    Time pedals are very good, but expensive and their platform hybrid Z-Strong and Atac MX pedals are absolutely worthless as platforms. Like stepping on grease with a big lump in the middle where the cleat is.

    Shimano's SPD system is incredibly outdated. People still like it, and I cannot figure out why. SPDs are beyond awful if you get mud or little gravel bits in the pedal or cleat, and they feel very notchy to get into and out of. Zero float from side to side makes them hard on some peoples' knees. They just plain suck compared to newer designs.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by glarior View Post
    Is there a pedal that allows normal shoes to work then be able to use clip in shoes too?
    Not anything good, honestly. i've been down that road a long way, and never found anything that lived up to its intent. Most fall FAR short at both being a clip-in and a platform.
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  22. #22
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    Shimano PD-M785 for SPD. Pretty much bullet proof.

    Straitline DeFactos for Flats. Uber-grippy, but god help you if you slip off a pedal and aren't wearing guards.
    Check out my You Tube Channel

  23. #23
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    I also have to agree if your going for platform pedals the Canfield Crampon Ultimates are worth the price.

  24. #24
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    Shimano PD-M780 or PD-M785. BULLETPROOF and super easy to grease!

    I can't believe how hard I've smacked mine with no ill effects whatsoever.

  25. #25
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    For best results, I think it's probably better to have them separate, clipless pedals with clipless shoes and flat pedals with flat shoes, as there's much less compromise that way.

    If you want flat/platform pedals, these are solid quality pedals at a good price ($30-60). They're actually made by a brand called HT (their Nano series), but are made to another brand's specs or are simply rebranded.

    Nashbar Verge
    Nukeproof Proton

    Forte Covert
    Nukeproof Neutron

    Forte Transfer
    Nukeproof Electron
    Deity Compound

    If you want premium quality, you're looking at paying $100+. These are what you want if you can appreciate quality.

    Spank Spike
    Canfield
    HT (EVO series)
    etc.

    Things in between usually are subpar for the price (assuming street price or msrp) compared to these, considering the new trend of wanting thin platforms that are tough and have just the right amount of grip.

  26. #26
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    Prefer flats, runnin' Deity Skyscrapers.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    im eyeing these

    Race Face

    I have both flat and clipless pedals... I put a set of the Race Face Atlas on one of my bikes last week. Definitely the best pedal I have used.

  28. #28
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    Wow so many to try lol. I stopped by my mom n pop bike store and talked to them for an hour. Going to try crank brothers candy. They have some other ones I can try if I dont like. Now to buy shoes....

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

  29. #29
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    I just got the Deity Compounds...I love the crap out of em.

  30. #30
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    I'm in the same boat on pedals. But no clipless for me. Rode the old Primo flats off my bmx bike for a year and then went Azonic 420's. They grip well, but I generally wear a 12 wide and they are a bit narrow. I think I've narrowed down to the DMR Vaults, or the Spank Spikes, but I'm leaning toward the vaults.
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  31. #31
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    I just rebuilt some Wellgo pedals that came on my bike. I cut off some of the excess material and drilled/tapped some holes for some machine screws. I haven't had them out on the trail yet (because of the snow) but I'm looking forward to trying them out since they were $Free.99! A simple bench test proves that they are sticky to my shoes, won't know for sure until I ride it though.

    Before


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  32. #32
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    I am currently running HT AE03 flats and they are hands down the best pedals I have had. Downside is the price but you will not be disappointed.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by glarior View Post
    Wow so many to try lol. I stopped by my mom n pop bike store and talked to them for an hour. Going to try crank brothers candy. They have some other ones I can try if I dont like. Now to buy shoes....

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    I give HIGH marks for Five-Ten - 5.10 Shoes. I have Freerider for MTBing & Exium Guide hiking boots for everyday winter wear/work. Everytime I get them caked in mud..hose off at the end of the day...dry by fire ..next day..WOW they look new again HA!
    Realy though..Tuff-est-shoe I have ever bought Hands down..both of them..worth the money. Google "Stealth Rubber" = SCIENCE!!
    Oh and the sticky factory is amazing...you won't slip on pinned flats...if yer slipping..yer bailing anyway..I have slamed the ground as I couldn't get my foot off in time ..felt like a damn rodie! LOL
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ooctrl View Post
    Hey MrMetallo and anyone else who cares and wants to know,

    If you have a pedal with top inserting screws, pins, hex, whatever...all you gotta do is get a small metal saw before they grind down to the pedal body and carve a small notch. Then a nice flathead screwdriver will take care of the rest. Can fix any pedal that way with top insert style pedals.
    Nice! I hadn't thought of that. I have a narrow file that would work. I could throw it in the camelback without too much trouble.

  35. #35
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    I just got some Shimano Saints. They are awesome.

    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try-saint-pedal.jpg
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  36. #36
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    Poll on the All Mountain page place clipless vs. Flats at 65/35. I think a lot of guys would find themselves faster or more comfortable on a set of modern day great flats with a good pair of shoes... Especially the Enduro/AM crowd.

  37. #37
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    try both, if your new I would say flats if your tying new stuff technically, if your comfortable with your trails go clipless. I ride mallets but I wouldn't suggest them for someone new to clipless. With crank brothers you gotta twist more, the angle of release seems futher to me, and the spring tension is preset. But they do loosen as the brass cleats wear. I actually took a dremel tool to mine and shaped them to release a bit easier. to confuse things more clip pedals with spiked platforms act differently with different shoes. my answer shoes are more arched than my fivetens. so they float more not engaging the spikes. I had to put in the taller spikes and take the shims out from under the cleats. I do like the extra support from the surrounding platform.

    in contrast shimano and wellgo are spd..... which usually has tension adjustment. so you can set them to your comfort level. shimano also has easier release cleats. I believe there the 56 cleats.
    for the most part I would say flats.... as your learning your skills, just to take the being stuck element out of it, It can be a hindering distraction. as you develop, you can learn or condition yourself to get out of clipless. JMO. im sure many may feel the opposite, learn clipless first.

  38. #38
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    I also ran half clip/half platforms from nashbar for a while. great price great idea. the only problem is that if you tend to start preferring clip or flats, its annoying to have to take you eyes off the trail to get the pedal flipped the way you want it. but they do work for predominantly riding clipped and going to the flatside for sketchy stuff. if you go this route, these pedals are more effective with a tennis shoe sole surrounding the cleat, usually marketed at DH, or even some touring shoes. something with a tennis shoe type sole around the cleat. standard mtb clipless shoes don't engage the flats well. Theyre more like football cleats.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    These work pretty good.

    <img src=http://www.unicyclist.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8874&stc=1&d=112154860 7>

    <Img src=http://fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/downhill-freeride/472942d1248762043-brooklyn-machine-works-shinburger-bearings-bmw-brave-killah.jpg>
    Think you could also use these to fend off a rabid grizzley, or maybe a tyrannosaurus rex. Burliest pedals ever??
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  40. #40
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    Something tells me and I'm not sure what it is, that Fuglio is not a weight weenie.

  41. #41
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    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try

    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    Shimano's SPD system is incredibly outdated. People still like it, and I cannot figure out why. SPDs are beyond awful if you get mud or little gravel bits in the pedal or cleat, and they feel very notchy to get into and out of. Zero float from side to side makes them hard on some peoples' knees. They just plain suck compared to newer designs.
    I laugh in your general direction. You indeed can read anything on the internet.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    I laugh in your general direction. You indeed can read anything on the internet.
    I know! Can you actually believe there are people that still defend SPDs?! They must be about a thousand years old, and their grandkids help them type
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomahawk3Niner View Post
    I just got some Shimano Saints. They are awesome.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    +1 Made center pins longer and all the rest shorter, awesome grip with 5.10's and just the right amount of float for me.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by No Name View Post
    Prefer flats, runnin' Deity Skyscrapers.
    I ran Skyscrapers (V1) for a while and loved them, but hated the pins on the old version. I still have them and use them on another bike. I've been running Chromag Scarabs on my Surge. So far so good.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    I know! Can you actually believe there are people that still defend SPDs?! They must be about a thousand years old, and their grandkids help them type
    You really do not know what you are talking about, do you?

    It is the third generation of SPD right now, it does not work even close to the first gen. They are popular for a reason - they are bulletproof and work perfectly fine.

    If you like the Time/CB style retention mechanism, get Look Quartz.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burt4x4 View Post
    I like pinned flats
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have about 350miles on these Forte Covert pedals. I can point my toes get full circle power easy sticks to my 5.10s like peanutbutter on bread....
    The new model is black, the grey is no more....Performance Bike carrys them..thin, light..hex bolt hole on the inside, comes with replacement pins..won't brake the bank....Not as SICK as thoes ^^^RaceFace^^ (me want!!) but they work great!
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    don't those things just **** your shin up though... I have more scars on my shins, than stars in the sky because of those bastards hahaha, but they're a great pedal. even in rain and mud the grip is ridiculous

  47. #47
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    +1 on the spds. Never had any issues with mud, clipping in, ect.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasF View Post
    don't those things just **** your shin up though... I have more scars on my shins, than stars in the sky because of those bastards hahaha, but they're a great pedal. even in rain and mud the grip is ridiculous
    While riding..nope cuz my 5.10s don't slip..now walking the bike..like into the garage to park it..sometimes I'll scratch my leg on accedent..a simple brush by will cut you LOL

    If my 5.10 slips it's cuz I'm crashing anyway LOL...super sticky = no slipping
    I guess if you miss the pedal with yer foot..bound to happen...I don't care about a litle pain and blood anyway..much better than being tied to my bike..for me :-)
    I'm not super graceful so crashing is part of my ride and when I go down..prefer thye bike to be..not under me or ontop of me..push bike away then proceed with slamming the ground! LOL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    You really do not know what you are talking about, do you?

    It is the third generation of SPD right now, it does not work even close to the first gen. They are popular for a reason - they are bulletproof and work perfectly fine.

    If you like the Time/CB style retention mechanism, get Look Quartz.
    damn the price is right... $50 for a set of carbon pedals isn't bad at all

    -=Jason=-

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burt4x4 View Post
    While riding..nope cuz my 5.10s don't slip..now walking the bike..like into the garage to park it..sometimes I'll scratch my leg on accedent..a simple brush by will cut you LOL

    If my 5.10 slips it's cuz I'm crashing anyway LOL...super sticky = no slipping
    I guess if you miss the pedal with yer foot..bound to happen...I don't care about a litle pain and blood anyway..much better than being tied to my bike..for me :-)
    I'm not super graceful so crashing is part of my ride and when I go down..prefer thye bike to be..not under me or ontop of me..push bike away then proceed with slamming the ground! LOL
    yeah, I usually get pedal bite when biking up hill and then I hit a sudden water drainage ditch and it slips out, or if I change down a gear when i'm putting too much pressure on the pedals

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    im eyeing these

    Race Face

    I just bought these and have used them for two rides. Paired with my Teva Links, it's like being clipped in. My feet don't move!

    Also, browse through this thread.

    Platform Pedal Shootout, the best flat is...

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    I'm waiting to try out spank spike. Deff much better than my zuzu pedals around the yard. And I only paid $100 for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    You really do not know what you are talking about, do you?
    come on, kid. lighten up. you got all sarcastic, so i replied in kind. I cannot stand SPDs, and yes, I've used gens 1 and 3 of the design. I do know quite well what I'm talking about. I cannot stand either of them for the reasons I mentioned above. That's my opinion, and it'll stay that way unless you can prove to me (scientifically, if you please) that SPDs are superior in function to other offerings, you're just trolling. Durability isn't everything in a pedal. The Ford Model T was durable for its time. We've moved on to better things. It's ok to do that, even with pedals.
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    I had Spank spikes on my last bike, very nice pedal, I have Raceface aeffects(cheaper than the atlus) now and I'm liking them just as much.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    come on, kid. lighten up. you got all sarcastic, so i replied in kind. I cannot stand SPDs, and yes, I've used gens 1 and 3 of the design. I do know quite well what I'm talking about. I cannot stand either of them for the reasons I mentioned above. That's my opinion, and it'll stay that way unless you can prove to me (scientifically, if you please) that SPDs are superior in function to other offerings, you're just trolling. Durability isn't everything in a pedal. The Ford Model T was durable for its time. We've moved on to better things. It's ok to do that, even with pedals.
    Kid? That's a new one.

    You claimed it is an old design, which it is not. Which came across as an asinine and uninformed statement. Mud clearance, engagement, shoe contact all had been greatly improved.

    It functions perfectly well. It allows adjustment of retention, which CB can not do. Side to side float is irrelevant - and platform pedals that people use have zero float in any direction. It does not destroy shoes like CB/Time (Look has a much nicer platform). There is an available multi-release cleat.

    If you do not like it, don't. Just do not spew ******** for a fact.

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    My personal favorite pedals are hands-down Canfield Crampon Ultimates. So grippy in all the right ways, but still easy to re-position your foot. And they are only 6mm thick at the face so hardly no pedal strikes.

    But if you don't want to spend that much, it's hard to go wrong with Diety Decoys.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasF View Post
    yeah, I usually get pedal bite when biking up hill and then I hit a sudden water drainage ditch and it slips out, or if I change down a gear when i'm putting too much pressure on the pedals
    Ha! Yeah I hear you..just yesterday evening ^^similar situation. My reaction was like a freekin rattlesnake was under my bike LOL...Feet in the AIR LOL
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    DeFacto or V12 is what i like, but for a light trailbike like that i would have look for a option like Vault or Superstar Nano Thru that has a good big platforms with exelent grip, but is lighter.

    The right shoe is half the job. When i bought the Five10s it transformed my riding. Thought my $250 Adidas shoes had good grip, but they suck vs the Five10.

    But then again the Five10 is a heavy stiff shoe, and not a light xc shoe.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    You claimed it is an old design, which it is not. Which came across as an asinine and uninformed statement... Mud clearance, engagement, shoe contact all had been greatly improved.
    It IS an old design. From 1990 to be exact. How is it asinine to say that SPDs are an old design when they are almost a quarter century old? The only pedal design still in use today that is older is the original Look design. VERY little has changed on the SPD in terms of design. Small improvements have been made to both the cleat and the mechanism, but it has largely remained the same. Google it. Look at pictures if you think I'm wrong. But even with the small changes made, the new iterations have not fully addressed some of its initial design issues, such as mud clearance. It's gotten better, but still is not even comparable with other systems like Time and CB. My three friends who ride with the latest SPD pedals STILL have problems every time it gets really muddy. My friend with Time Atacs never has issues. Ever. My brother with egg beaters never has issues. When I ride with my Mallets, I never have issues either. But the SPD crew, every time. If they plant a foot down, it is guaranteed that I will have to wait while they find a little stick to clear the clay out their pedals and cleats, or they sit there trying to clip into their pedals over and over, using their cleats to try and push the mud and gravel out. Yeah, sounds like a fantastic design to me! SPDs have improved. That is a fact. No, they are not at a point where I would use the word 'good' to describe them. Why? On a scale of 1-10, going from a 2 to a 3 is not what I would call a good pedal.

    The only thing that SPD has over other pedals is adjustable release. But I must say, never once have I been riding and thought to myself, 'dang, I really wish I could tighten/loosen my pedal release a tiny bit.' Why would I need that when even my old worn out mallets hold me in just fine?

    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Side to side float is irrelevant.
    Oh boy. Here's where you've shown your true colors. Float means a LOT to many riders, especially those with bad knees. My brother and I have a disease in our knees that eats the cartilage and bone caps away. We rely heavily on the ability to slightly change our foot angles during a ride to spread the wear out to different parts of the joint. That is not possible with SPDs (which I have tried to use numerous times). Float matters to many others too. You don't care about float. That's fine. That's your opinion, and I have no problem accepting that. But pull your head out and realize that if someone feels differently than you, they are not wrong. How many pro road cyclists use Speedplay pedals? Tons. Why? Precisely because they have a lot of float. That's a fact. Look it up. Trying to pass off an opinion as fact like saying 'float is irrelevant' shows your deficiency. Do you by chance have a large brow ridge and grunt a lot? Or perhaps you drive around Norcal in a flat black, lifted compensator truck with a Metal Mulisha sticker and a Dakine pad on your tailgate all year long? If so, I understand why you say the things you do. All I can say is check your local Craigslist. There might be a support group for you somewhere.

    Now PLEASE stop embarrassing yourself. You struck first. You tried to Pinkbike your way over me after I simply stated my opinion. Trust me, you are fighting a losing battle. You should let it go. Or don't, but please learn to properly debate before you spray more word vomit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burt4x4 View Post
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    I have those as well. no complaints.

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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    I know! Can you actually believe there are people that still defend SPDs?! They must be about a thousand years old, and their grandkids help them type
    Idiotic. SPDs go literally forever, compared to CB and others where sometimes the pedal just falls off the spindle, spindle breaks, bearings blow up, etc (all problems I had with them). I can't say I've ever had a SPD mechanism break through about, oh 15 sets or so?, although I did rebuild a few knockoffs at the bikeshop (tensioning that spring is a PITA!). You can get 520s or 535s for around 35 bucks and they last pretty much forever, kind of hard to beat. For the record, the newer SPD design clears snow just fine, we had, oh, a little more than a foot of fresh snow today and I was out riding and no problems. A few reasons why I prefer SPDs besides just the reliability is the consistency of exit. With Crank Brother's pedals you rely more on angular deflection to release the cleat, whereas the shimano ones rely more on spring tension, meaning if you yank hard enough, they will come out without being deflected to the required limit that CB pedals require. Although the tension may be lower or it may be "easier" to deflect the CB pedals to exit, if you don't get enough angular deflection, they simply will not release no matter how hard you pull. This has caused a few slow-speed falls with the CB pedals because I was trying to rotate my heel inward due to the balance at the exact moment. I find that shimano is easier to get out in this situation (rotating heel inward), which although more rare, still happens. Then there's the cleats, which last a lot longer, vs the brass cleats that wear down and start creating un-predictable release events as they get too loose to stay in the mechanism, causing your knee to shoot into the handlebar, or when you hit a rock with the pedal and the mechanism releases. Also on pedals like the Mallet where the entire mechanism is not exposed, I found there's a higher chance that you'll sometimes try to engage the pedal when the "eggbeater" part is 90 degrees to the body, causing your shoe and cleat to "roll" off the pedal forward. I've definitely had this happen more than once. The 30 degree cant that the 434, 545 and 647 pedals have is a huge advantage here. It's much harder to "mess up" clipping back in, it avoids the negatives of both the CB rotating mechanism and "flat" SPD knockoffs like old azonics. Then of course the shimano pedals have adjustable spring tension.

    To be fair, CB does make the best disposable pedals if you need light weight for one race, but otherwise I find it's not worth it, at least my trashed CB pedals seem to indicate that.

    Hold old are chains?
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  62. #62
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    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Idiotic. SPDs go literally forever, compared to CB and others where sometimes the pedal just falls off the spindle, spindle breaks, bearings blow up, etc (all problems I had with them). I can't say I've ever had a SPD mechanism break through about, oh 15 sets or so?, although I did rebuild a few knockoffs at the bikeshop (tensioning that spring is a PITA!). You can get 520s or 535s for around 35 bucks and they last pretty much forever, kind of hard to beat. For the record, the newer SPD design clears snow just fine, we had, oh, a little more than a foot of fresh snow today and I was out riding and no problems. A few reasons why I prefer SPDs besides just the reliability is the consistency of exit. ?
    Do not waste you time arguing with an idiot. He does not know what he is talking about and too dumb and stubborn to admit it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    Do not waste you time arguing with an idiot. He does not know what he is talking about and too dumb and stubborn to admit it.
    True.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Also spd's do have float- 3 degrees (xtr 4). If I lived in a wet/muddy climate I might use something different but I wouldn't know about that.

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    Well some SPD's go forever, but not their latest design. My wife is using my old SPD XTR's and they are in their 8th or so year with no issues. I tried the new design XTR's this year and the seals lasted less than 30 days, I sent them back. SPD's have very little float when dirty which happens in the first hour of riding in Moab. Float or a slight can't of the foot is essential when riding tech. trails. I know a proffesianal tour guide who carries CB's sell to riders who use SPD's and have prob. clicking out. With that I know an expert rider who prefers SPD's and another who uses CB's. For me the reliability of consistent release is worth a pedal rebuild once a year, and yes the first gen. CB's seals were short lived.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    True.
    To be fair, you can't judge all mallets by the first editions. I still have mine sitting an a box somewhere. They were terrible. The new Mallet DHs are a very different beast, with some major changes to the spindles and platform. CB is a really odd company, and I don't really like them much. I've had gen 1 mallets which were garbage. My wife has gen 2 Candys, and she hasn't had a single problem with them. My gen 2 mallets were completely problem free for 3.5 years, with zero maintenance. It's luck of the draw with CB, and I agree, and they deserve every bit of the criticism the get. If I were to go for a new set of clippy pedals, I'd probably get Times. Excellent track record, super strong, and I really like the simple mechanism. I've ridden CBs and Atacs in the snow too, and they functioned just fine. I don't see snow as being too challenging for most modern pedal designs, but clay/mud can be a different story, especially when it has small gravel in it. You and Axe like SPDs. That's great. Sure, they're are durable. Reliable too. Never once disagreed with that. I just like pedals that have characteristics that SPD is unable to deliver.

    Now a note to the ever-heated Axe: PLEASE understand this. I DO know what I'm talking about. I've had PLENTY of personal experience with SPDs. I have. If you still doubt that, I don't know what else to say. You get so fired up about my opinion, so let's base it in something concrete. Let's talk physics, statics, material strengths. Let's discuss leverage ratios, material yield strengths, clearance dimensions, torques, and stress concentrators. That's where things like durability, consistency of release, etc come from, and that is where I base much of my dislike for SPDs. I don't find it offensive in the least that you, Jayem, and many others like SPDs. But I don't like them at all. Axe, that should be fine with you, but for some reason it seems to get you all heated. Why is that? If you want to know specifics as to why I don't like them, I'll give you plenty of info. If you had challenged my initial opinion in a constructive way none of this would have happened. I welcome conflicting opinions, as long as they aren't ignorant and obnoxious. But you came in with the insult guns ablaze, hiding behind the safety of your monitor. If you want to discuss this like adults, with fact-based data, you know where to find me. But if you're still looking for a fight, may I suggest registering over at Pinkbike?
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by charging_rhinos View Post
    To be fair, you can't judge all mallets by the first editions.
    Come on, this is a company that tried to make cranks by gluing to halves of a hollow metal design together, it was a total failure and they split in half. Their name is "CRANK" and they can't even figure out how to make cranks. You are right that if you want reliable CB pedals, you buy times, although some of the newer higher end times seem to be having some reliability issues. The SPD mechanism works great, I'm not sure why you would want to change it. What is the problem, that it consistently releases at the tension you set? That they last year after year and take abuse like none other? (people behind me have commented they saw sparks shooting off when I hit them against rocks at SoMo) That they improved the mud/snow clearance and can now "push through"? CB seems to make one or two features to "hook" you, like light weight and mud clearance, but their product usually falls woefully short in other areas, like with their pumps, kronolog, cranks, etc...

    The pedal in the picture was only about 3 mo old.
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  68. #68
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    i have the Saints too. love them but they are a bit heavy (supposedly 499 grams)

    but theyre solid, grip nice, and theyre comfortable

    CRC has them for $66 right now

    Shimano Saint MX80 Flat Pedals | Chain Reaction Cycles

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Come on, this is a company that tried to make cranks by gluing to halves of a hollow metal design together, it was a total failure and they split in half.
    haha, I had forgotten about their foray into cranks. That was pretty dang funny (provided you didn't buy a set, I guess). Believe me, I'm not a CB fanboy by any stretch. The reasons I don't use SPDs include, among a few other things, the complete lack of float in them. Whether bad form or not, I need some float so that I can micro-adjust my positioning on the pedals from time to time. My knees inflame really badly after long rides if I don't, and it is lessened somewhat when I am able to. When I switched to CBs, my knee issues went WAY down instantly. I also love the ease of clipping into them. I ride in an area that, when it rains,becomes incredibly sticky clay. It often clogged my SPDs to the point that clipping in and out became unreliable. When I switched to other pedals, I never really felt like I missed the adjustable release when I left SPDs, so that was a non-issue for me personally. Durability on my first set was horrible, but I got a set of the Mallet 2s for so cheap that I decided to give them one more chance. I mangled them on rocks all the time, and they held up incredibly well. No bent egg beaters, no cracks, no bearing/bushing failures whatsoever. I do recognize that I am a minority there. The new Mallet DHs are pretty good too, if you need a platform + clipless pedal for some reason, but I've only ridden a bike with them, not owned a pair. I do agree with their design changes for the most part though, especially the new radiused axles. But CB as a company does suck, and I've stopped using their stuff. About the only thing that hasn't had quality issues is their logo.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Come on, this is a company that tried to make cranks by gluing to halves of a hollow metal design together, it was a total failure and they split in half. Their name is "CRANK" and they can't even figure out how to make cranks. You are right that if you want reliable CB pedals, you buy times, although some of the newer higher end times seem to be having some reliability issues. The SPD mechanism works great, I'm not sure why you would want to change it. What is the problem, that it consistently releases at the tension you set? That they last year after year and take abuse like none other? (people behind me have commented they saw sparks shooting off when I hit them against rocks at SoMo) That they improved the mud/snow clearance and can now "push through"? CB seems to make one or two features to "hook" you, like light weight and mud clearance, but their product usually falls woefully short in other areas, like with their pumps, kronolog, cranks, etc...

    The pedal in the picture was only about 3 mo old.
    Sounds like theres some issues. Interestingly, I found more top dh pros use crank bros. Im sure if they wanted to use spd they would. Its not like shimano cant afford sponsoring. They're the biggest boy on the block. Don't know why, but it seems more choose CB mallets. The latest world champions are cb mallets users: Steve Smith, Aaron Gwinn, Danny Hart, Gee Atherton, Greg Minnar, Steve Peat to name a few.
    Last edited by akiracornell; 03-16-2014 at 03:28 PM.

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    Spd's don't consistently release in difficult conditions. I 've used them in snowy trails and they froze up, clay mud and for sure they lock up, red fine dirt such as Moab red dirt and they are good for a few hours but not all day. SPD's probably have better bearings than CB and my experience with the new style XTR's was the exception, but CB's have improved and their consistent release is better IMO. I agree the Time's look good though.

  72. #72
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    Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try

    Saint M80s... Cheap and grippy (take screw spacers out)

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    Quote Originally Posted by fruitafrank View Post
    Spd's don't consistently release in difficult conditions. I 've used them in snowy trails and they froze up.
    Interesting, I've used them ALL WINTER down to about -15F/-26C and haven't had any problems. Now I do usually go for my flats when it gets that cold, because even with winter boots, heated insoles and insulation, they are heat-sinks that will suck heat away, but that only starts to happen in the single digits and colder for me, so the SPDs stay on most of the winter. We just had over a foot dump here, so again, no issues with SPDs. Not sure why you can't get them to work in the cold, but I'd suspect if you have a problem with ice like that, any pedal will be affected, as well as other parts on your bike (I've seen people's shifters freeze up due to moisture in the housing).Pedals... so many pedals.. but which ones to try-gedc0288.jpg
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    at those temps, I wouldn't trust the older mallet spindles at all. they had sharp steps in their diameter, and they were already pretty brittle. Cold plus brittle and I bet they would fail a lot more rapidly. I mostly ski in the winter, unless I drive south to moab ot st george/virgin, so my bike rarely sees those temps.
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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Interesting, I've used them ALL WINTER down to about -15F/-26C and haven't had any problems. Click image for larger version. 

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    Funny how this argument is supposed to work for you with regards to how good Shimano is, but not for me when I mention how little trouble I've had with CB pedals.
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    In fairness my SPD's that froze up in the snow were the old style, the ones that last forever. Yes my shifter/derr. froze up also so we were all riding single speeds. I did ride the new SPD's/XTR for 3 weeks in Moab and the usual sticky performance was there after a couple hours in the grit. I started carrying dry lube to doctor them during the ride. 3weeks in and they crapped the seal and grease came out so longevity wasn't good. My wife uses SPD's as do several friends so I hope my experience wasn't typical. In the past SPD's were the Gold Std. for reliability .

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    Wow!!!

    [QUOTE=Fuglio;11057769]These work pretty good.



    I want a set of those, some serious shin damage is about to happen.

  78. #78
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    I recently gave up clipless to ride platforms for a bit and learn some technique (e.g jumping). Anyway, I like these for my platforms. Point One Podium2 .



    For clipless I like the Shiman M647. My advice is ride platforms for a while. Learn to jump, bunnyhop, manual, etc the correct way then move to clipless. It has been very tough for me to correct some bad habits I had developed over the year (e.g. pulling with my legs on jumps) that could have been prevented had I stuck with platforms from the get go.

    Good luck and have fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Idiotic. SPDs go literally forever, compared to CB and others where sometimes the pedal just falls off the spindle, spindle breaks, bearings blow up, etc (all problems I had with them). I can't say I've ever had a SPD mechanism break through about, oh 15 sets or so?, although I did rebuild a few knockoffs at the bikeshop (tensioning that spring is a PITA!). You can get 520s or 535s for around 35 bucks and they last pretty much forever, kind of hard to beat. For the record, the newer SPD design clears snow just fine, we had, oh, a little more than a foot of fresh snow today and I was out riding and no problems. A few reasons why I prefer SPDs besides just the reliability is the consistency of exit. With Crank Brother's pedals you rely more on angular deflection to release the cleat, whereas the shimano ones rely more on spring tension, meaning if you yank hard enough, they will come out without being deflected to the required limit that CB pedals require. Although the tension may be lower or it may be "easier" to deflect the CB pedals to exit, if you don't get enough angular deflection, they simply will not release no matter how hard you pull. This has caused a few slow-speed falls with the CB pedals because I was trying to rotate my heel inward due to the balance at the exact moment. I find that shimano is easier to get out in this situation (rotating heel inward), which although more rare, still happens. Then there's the cleats, which last a lot longer, vs the brass cleats that wear down and start creating un-predictable release events as they get too loose to stay in the mechanism, causing your knee to shoot into the handlebar, or when you hit a rock with the pedal and the mechanism releases. Also on pedals like the Mallet where the entire mechanism is not exposed, I found there's a higher chance that you'll sometimes try to engage the pedal when the "eggbeater" part is 90 degrees to the body, causing your shoe and cleat to "roll" off the pedal forward. I've definitely had this happen more than once. The 30 degree cant that the 434, 545 and 647 pedals have is a huge advantage here. It's much harder to "mess up" clipping back in, it avoids the negatives of both the CB rotating mechanism and "flat" SPD knockoffs like old azonics. Then of course the shimano pedals have adjustable spring tension.

    To be fair, CB does make the best disposable pedals if you need light weight for one race, but otherwise I find it's not worth it, at least my trashed CB pedals seem to indicate that.

    Hold old are chains?
    Alright........saw it first hand last night...........crank bros mallet spindle just snapped off. Granted this kid saidd he just replaced the beqrings on them, so they probably had some hard miles, and this kid is one of the top kom guys on strava on our local trail system, so he can push. But it was ironically after i claimed thembeing the top choice of world champion downhillers. SNAP!!!!!!! Is what we all we heard as he tryed to crank up a climb. But he did say he breaks everything, lots intense frames also. Maybe crank bros pedals brake alot cuz the best guys are riding them? That could be a correation huh? Heck who knows, maybe they are using sub.metals compared to shimano?

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    I love living in California as I don't have to consider mud or snow getting stuck in my cleats, but I prefer flats anyways.

    To the OP - the Shimano Saint pedals are great pedals that can be had cheap. I like that they are grippy, but still allow me to reposition my feet with out lifting my foot off the pedal. Also, the platform sits further away from the crank arm compared to the newer thin pedals. This helps if you have duck feet positioning like I do, but I believe is the cause of me clipping my pedals as well. I have the new Point One Podium 2s and while they're extremely light, the platform is too close to the crank arm for me (any one want to buy them?), but pedaling a light pedal feels amazing.

    A notable mention are the Spank Spikes. I only tested a pair around the block, but considering that the weight difference between the Spikes and the Saints weren't that different in my hands, I just kept the Saints. Another thing to mention is that the pins for the Saints are EXPENSIVE compared to most pedals where you could go to the hardware store to get metric allen bolts.

  81. #81
    No Stranger to danger....
    Reputation: Tone's's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=PedalSmax;11070181]
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    These work pretty good.



    I want a set of those, some serious shin damage is about to happen.
    Ive had a pair of these, no offecnce intended but they are very poor pedals imo, compared to screw in plins placed properly these offer very poor grip, they are ridiculously thick offering less clearance, they are heavy compared to a nice thin pair, theres nothing good about these pedals.
    But they actually dont cause shin damage, the molded pins just dont cut up your legs, put on some thin long pins like the straitlines that can open your leg up to your shin bone with ease and you will feel the difference.
    The ones above are the worst pedals ive ever used, and ive used a hell of a lot of different pedals.
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  82. #82
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    I'm a fanboy of CBs My AM has mallets DHs I have some old style candys I have had on a couple different bikes zero probs eggbeaters and new candys on other bikes I still like being clipped in. Years ago I had those old style mallets that Jayem had a picture of. I still have the scars from those chrome thingies on my calfs. I took them off. When I had those one came off the spindle while riding trails in Laguna. Ducked taped it back on. Rode down to their old canyon acares house they operated out of at the time. One of the guys stopped what he was doing rebuilt both pedals in about twenty minutes for free and I was off. My buddy bought that bike from me and still using the pedals on another bike.

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