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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Johnny LaRoux's Avatar
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    Opinions on Coiler vs. Heckler for XC/AM

    I have an 06 Coiler, but use it more as an XC/AM bike rather than a FR rig that it was meant to be. I'm looking at a used Heckler frame with a DHX 5.0 shock as an alternative, as I see mostly good things about them on this forum and others.

    The question is, would I just be trading apples for apples, or is the Heckler a better "all-round" frame than the Coiler?

  2. #2
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
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    Heckler

    you don't say if the shock is air or coil,, but in short, you could build the Heckler up to be an excellent AM/trail bike, and use the Coiler as intended: FR.

    The reduced weight and travel will be a breeze after pedaling the Coiler around.

    Jim

  3. #3
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    Reputation: thecrackerasscracker's Avatar
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    I have both frames and the heckler is way better for xc/am the frame is much lighter
    the coiler frame i think are made with cast iron LOL
    i have an xl heckler in blue 4 sale
    It might get a little steep from here

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimC.
    you don't say if the shock is air or coil,, but in short, you could build the Heckler up to be an excellent AM/trail bike, and use the Coiler as intended: FR.

    The reduced weight and travel will be a breeze after pedaling the Coiler around.

    Jim
    Actually I have the stock Vanilla R, as well as a Float RP3, which I am just installing on the Coiler. Probably would go with the RP3 if I went the Heckler route.

  5. #5
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    I prefer the low pivot to high pivot for trail riding. If you ask me why, I would not be able to tell. Just feels better.

    Why do you say it was meant to be a FR bike? I now ride 07 Coiler (with slightly more travel then 06), and I do intend to keep it as trail/AM bike for some time. I think it is quite good at that.

  6. #6
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    Why do you say it was meant to be a FR bike? I now ride 07 Coiler (with slightly more travel then 06), and I do intend to keep it as trail/AM bike for some time. I think it is quite good at that.[/QUOTE]

    Well, I guess the lines between AM and FR are pretty blurred these days...I had a Dawg Primo prior to the Coiler, and it was a better "trail" bike, but it never felt comfortable on anything a little more agressive (bear in mind that I live in Vancouver, so the trails here are pretty different than most). The Coiler definately feels better on the gnarly stuff, but it's just a little heavier uphill.

    Oh hell...I think I'm looking for the perfect do-all bike, that doesn't exist, or if it does...it's out of my price range!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny LaRoux
    Oh hell...I think I'm looking for the perfect do-all bike, that doesn't exist, or if it does...it's out of my price range!
    You can buy a second light wheelset (say Hope Pro 2 with 819 from chainreaction), keep it with 2.1 tires, and buy a Float R rear shock (is it 7.825x2.0?), and a set of proper reducers for it. Then in about 5 minutes you can swap shock (pound and a half), and wheelset (another couple pounds - depending on what you have) for those rides that do not require burly stuff. That's what I intend to do for longer trail rides - only I need to find a shock with 2.25" stroke (or convert a 2.0"). Like having one and a half bikes instead of one.

  8. #8
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    That is a valid idea...

    I'm running a Sun SOS on the back and a Outlaw front with 20mm axle (unfortunately still with the Drop off IV fork), so I don't know how much weight I can save and still use the 20mm set up. Lighter tires for sure!

    I've just gotten a Float RP3 for it, which is far lighter than the Vanilla R. Haven't really tried it out on the trails yet though. Maybe more time with that will change my mind.

    Thanks

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny LaRoux
    I'm running a Sun SOS on the back and a Outlaw front with 20mm axle (unfortunately still with the Drop off IV fork), so I don't know how much weight I can save and still use the 20mm set up. Lighter tires for sure!
    As light as anything else. Hope II for example converts to 20mm.

    I am planning on keeping two wheelsets - one existing set-up with burly 2.4", and a light one with 2.1/2.25", and two shocks that I can swap.

  10. #10
    Its got what plants crave
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    I rode my Coiler in an all-mountain capacity for quite some time. Plenty of long days climbing in the saddle. It definitely got me to where I am today. I can say that it's been a great frame as it's been good at everything I've thrown at it. I started out with a lightweight XC parts spec and eventually moved to more freeride oriented components like a dual ring with bash setup and RS Domain fork, and bigger brakes and a DHX5.0 coil and flat pedals. Now it's almost a devoted freeride rig but it's been great on everything I've used it for and has taken the hits and still will in the future. One of the best bikes I've had in my riding "career" and I think it's given me the confidence to go bigger and ride more technical stuff.

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