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  1. #26
    Knollician
    Reputation: tiSS'er's Avatar
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    sounds like some good riding out there- all the RFX terrain sounds promising.
    Road trip worthy from LA?

    http://www.bikemag.com/features/onli...est/index.html


    Check out #3 on the list and make up your own mind

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag

    if your answer is viejo, again, leaning harder toward the RFX
    Where is viejo?

  3. #28
    suspension whore
    Reputation: matthew's Avatar
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    Check out #3 on the list and make up your own mind[/QUOTE]


    rated B/N downeville and moab-- nuff said.
    guessing best time of year spring (ie now)?
    thanks foe the link
    matt
    Intense 6.6..... Demo 9.

    Mammoth MTN downhilling - check it out
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xb_m_pb0Ns0

  4. #29
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    Just to confuse things a bit. Take a look at the Sinister Splinter. There are 2 models, the ER and the MX. The ER is 4"-5" and the MX 5"-6". Both are OUTSTANDING bikes. They are linkage activated single pivots with the ability to adjust the HA an BB height with NO TOOLS. Even though there is no VPP or Horst going on, they pedal incredibly well (better, IMO than the Enduro with FSR or, again IMO, the Maestro linkage). They are also very tough bikes. You could run an ER at 6" (by swapping shocks, or just ordering the longer stroke shock from Sinister) with a Pike and still have a pretty light bike up to pretty much anything you would want to throw at it.
    -Skimming the successpool of corporate America-

  5. #30
    The Mountain Bike Life
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    You should bottom out ocasionaly...if you don't your not using all of your travel and should look at your setup better.

  6. #31
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    more valley rides

    Quote Originally Posted by matthew
    Check out #3 on the list and make up your own mind

    rated B/N downeville and moab-- nuff said.
    guessing best time of year spring (ie now)?
    thanks foe the link
    matt[/QUOTE]


    if you come you should do it very soon or wait 6 months. picking up the fat tire guide book by cosmic ray may be a good idea. there are all kinds of trails at south mtn....desert classic is good fun, pretty easy. east/west loops are good, some slightly technical sections. mormon/national trails...good fun, prepare to bleed. it's almost like a ritual to get busted up on the national. there's also some downhill as well.

    around the valley is the hawes loop just south of red mtn. in mesa. that is an amazing ride, especially if you do it close to sunset. mcdowell mtn. park where the old cactus cup was held is fun as well...3 loops, 1 short, 1 long, 1 technical. you can spend a couple days at the park (pemberton is easy, fun and fast. the park is NE of the valley in ftn. hills. there is also trail 100 near squaw/piestewa peak in phx. if you've never ridden here your in for a treat. hope you have some flat prevention and like rocks!


    if you're really feeling frisky i'd hit up some of the loops in prescott, sedona, and the schultz creek system in flaggstaff. always muy bueno. if you need more info. you can always pm me for info or hit up the arizona forum...there are a lot of people on that one all the time.

    peace in the hood.

  7. #32
    gravity curmudgeon
    Reputation: cowdog's Avatar
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    I don't have any useful feedback on the choice, although I am pondering some similar options.

    One thing to think about, however. Over the last nearly 20 years, I've heard people say that front suspension was overkill, FS was overkill, 4 inches was overkill, 5 inches was overkill, ... The question is't whether a bike is overkill; rather, I think the question is if these newer 6 or greater inch rear travel bikes have enough range for what I would call a typical mountain bike rider who pedals uphill and seeks out challenging trails/terrain. Slower is different from mismatch for climbing. We all love the descents, or at least for 99% of us that's a given. 6/6+inch FS bikes won't suck on the descents.

    That said, I don't feel sorry for my slower climbing buds on big travel bikes and usually don't feel outmatched descending with my 4 inch bike. Still, the allure of more travel is appealing -- I think of it as similar to fatter skis. Why not?

  8. #33
    mr. wonderful
    Reputation: dirtbag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boredwitless
    Where is viejo?
    some people call it 'old man'; i think viejo sounds better.

    from the national trail post at the pass just east of buena vista, climb the trail that intersects national to the south. at the top of the ridge, venture east, up a rock step, and even further, even though the trail looks thin and overgrown. descending the ridge riding pretty much east you will pick up the trail again. it's tight, twisty, loose, steep (in places), and exposed (in places). . .and a blast!! easily the toughest technical descending on south mountain.

    it will drop you out on 'secret trail' which connects to desert classic with about a 4-5 mile schlep back to the ramadas at 48th street.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    some people call it 'old man'; i think viejo sounds better.

    from the national trail post at the pass just east of buena vista, climb the trail that intersects national to the south. at the top of the ridge, venture east, up a rock step, and even further, even though the trail looks thin and overgrown. descending the ridge riding pretty much east you will pick up the trail again. it's tight, twisty, loose, steep (in places), and exposed (in places). . .and a blast!! easily the toughest technical descending on south mountain.

    it will drop you out on 'secret trail' which connects to desert classic with about a 4-5 mile schlep back to the ramadas at 48th street.
    Thanks for the info. Just from trying to picture it, I'm guessing its near to Corona de Loma, but to the East of that trail?

  10. #35
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    that's a fine steed...

    Quote Originally Posted by matthew
    Ridden all three and owned an ellswth ID
    ALL great bikes with slightly different characteristics ( and owner/ CS baggage)

    "6 pack/ RFX" - burrliest, heavyest incredible construction, turner CS, 6 inch travel. Coil shock stock
    "Nomad" - vpp, very plush, anodized option, slacker head anglr than 6.6, slightly longer too i believe. 6.4 inchs travel aprox, curved top tube (some love the look, others think vomiting dog?), air or coil build option.
    "6.6" - VPP, steeper head angle, slightly shorter chain stay/wheel base, no anodizing. 1.5 head tube. 6.6 " travel, air shoch stock.

    IMHO-
    Turner is the stiffest and burliest ie best for abusive, north shore type riding
    Nomad is slacker and longer than 6.6 so better for opening up on fast DH style riding
    6.6 slightly steeper and shorter, better for technical descending and climbing verses all out speed.
    Bear in mind these are generalizations made purely for comparitive purposes.
    With the right build and skilled rider they are all outstanding bikes for any all mountain riding, climbing and descending

    I went with the 6.6 because I wanted to use a non adjustable fox 36 Vanilla.
    I wanted a steeper head angle and I wanted to use a flush head set so I could shorten the A-C and use a 160mm travel fork and still climb OK (I have a dedicated 44lb DH rig so this is my everyday ride)
    I only weigh 155 so durability/frame construction/bombproofness, is less of a concern
    I was more concerned with getting the most travel to balance out the VAN 36 and putting the weight into heavier componentry ( Diablos DH bars and cranks, mavic cross max XL wheel set)
    I prefer anodized bikes for durability but it was a secondary concern
    I was worried about the DHX air but I'm very happy with it so far, ( looking foreward to tryinf a CCDB coil but not looking to upgrade at this point)
    I didnt want to exceed 34lbs with build.
    I didnt want a travel adjust fork
    ALL three companies seem to have great customer service

    In short I'm very happy with my choice and with 4 months of riding there's nothing I would change or do differently.
    If this was my only bike I would probably steepen out the HA with a longer fork or non flush headset as I'm sure it would still climb well enough.
    If you want a shorter A-C fork or travel adjustability I would try nomad or turner
    A stock coil would be better if you know you are going big or a turner.
    If you worry about bearing maintaince the turner bushing are fantastic.
    If you like funky design the nomad has loads of color options and can come as a complete build.
    Pedal feedback or chain tension is slighty noticable in granny gear on the VPP bikes although to me they feel like they bob less in the seated position in middle ring compared to the turner TNT or ellswth ID.
    VPP does have bottomless travel feel, less progressive feel until very end ( may be a DHX thing)
    All bike track well although my 6.6 bobs alot if climbing out the saddle with propedal off
    ( can easily be fixed by increasing propedal but not a concern for me. I just stay seated- i prefer to set and forget)
    If you want to race DH nomad MAY be more stable on a DH cource? guess?

    I'm reaching at this point- they are all great bikes. Read as much as you have patience for, then demo all three.
    The build will influence the ride "feel" but the decision will make its self.
    The hardest part is deciding on your own build.
    hope this helps







    that is one nice ride. i saw 2 people on them yesterday and was really impressed. what's funny is the # of people that say they're overkill, won't excel, not what i need, etc. however for all mountain trail riding in the super-rocky areas around here that seems like the way to go.

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