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Thread: No balls

  1. #1
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    No balls

    Seriously, I have no balls. My fiance is a hardcore MTBer, and I got into MTB after meeting her about 4 years ago. She loves really technical trails, rockpiles, and such. Anyway, she goes over lots of stuff that I chicken out on, although I'm a LOT better than when I started. I can easily outclimb her though.
    I get hurt alot, too. I'm always bleeding from several spots below the knees, broke a rib this spring, should have had stitches several times, etc.. I imagine my trepidation on dangerous stuff is related to me getting hurt a lot.
    How can I overcome this?
    Would knee/shin/elbow guards give me a psycological crutch?




    [SIZE="1"]Yes, I have a pair, and they do have hair on them.[/SIZE]

  2. #2
    Its got what plants crave
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    Armor up if you are getting injured. Some crashes are to be expected, but as you get better your confidence will increase. I think most stuff is 90% confidence, 10% skill. In the words of Stewie Griffin...


    "Whether you think you can, or think you can't, you're right."

  3. #3
    catskillclimber
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    Don't beat yourself up.

    I lost my balls a little over a year ago when I crashed at Plattekill and broke my collar bone and cracked my sternum requiring a Ti plate and seven screws. I recently purchased a new Reign and went trail riding only to chicken out on mild drops. I could almost see myself crashing on drops that I would not have thought twice about a year ago on a xc bike. It's OK and natural to be hesitant after getting hurt. Broken ribs suck and broken bones take you out of work, add to arthritis later in life, and keep you off your ride. Not everyone has to go big to be a good mountain biker and enjoy their ride. I regularly go to the bike park but ride it "all mountain" or as if I'm on a technical trail ride instead of looking for air and still have a blast when lift access riding. It is good to have pads and a ff helmet but don't let it give you a false sense of security. All the protective gear you can fit on won't stop your bones from breaking if you hit the ground hard enough. Controlling your speed is really the key, for me anyway. I found that out the hard way and it cost me 6 months off my bike. Enjoy the sport on your own terms.

  4. #4
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    Definetely buy some armour for your knee/shin and arms it will give you confidence .
    You need to learn to relax before you do any technical riding,If you tense up your body can not soak up as much as when its relaxed.
    I have had some quite big crashes including dropping 20 ft to the floor when i got a drop wrong.I also have had lots of smaller mishaps that sometimes have resulted in injury (sometimes worse than the bigger crashes).If you keep thinking you are going to crash you will.Stay confident and tell yourself you can do it.Find a section you havent done cleanly and try it a few times untill you can slowly as you clean sections you will get more confident in your riding skills.
    It takes time and a lot of riding to get the confidence to do certain stuff.

    I have been riding for 8 years and there are still sections i see that are difficult but in the end i will do them.It is mainly as the other person said 90% confidence an 10% skill.Not everybody wants to do drops and very technical riding.

    If she has been riding a lot more years than you she will have a lot more confidence and experience and she should allow for this when riding with you and should help to improve your riding.
    Good luck

    Get out and ride

  5. #5
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    Commitment is everything. Only when you commit ahead of time will you have the SPEED to carry you thru/over stuff. I crash on stuff all the time because I am going too slow.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim311

    "Whether you think you can, or think you can't, you're right."
    So true, and also attributable to H. Ford.

  7. #7
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    It does no good if you "force" yourself into doing something you don't have confidence in. You're just asking to be injured if you aren't 100% committed or confident. Build your confidence up on lesser trails and stunts, then progress in difficulty.

  8. #8
    attending to my vices
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    Make sure you drop your seat for tech dh stuff. Yes, just wearing shin guards is a huge confidence booster. Also assess your bike. Is it ideal for your riding application?

    If you just get some simple leg and elbow guards and put them on for the downhills then you should feel a lot safer. I would reccomend leg armor first elbow is a bit extra and can get annoying.
    OVER THE LINE SMOKEY!

  9. #9
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    Dont get pushed into trying anything super-technical. It takes time to build up the confidence and skills to ride technical stunts and trails well. As long as you are always learning and advancing then don't stress.

  10. #10
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    carefully cultivate a pair by yelling loudly and driving big trucks, and with a steady diet of mountain dew, redbull, steak, and hot dogs.

    But seriously, what kind of bike are you on? some bikes are alot more confidence inspiring for rocky gnar then others, not all bikes are created equal.

  11. #11
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    Get used to the gnar. And remember, no pain no gain. Don't let scars or scabs slow you down.

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    Practice trackstands and balance drills (riding on curbs, etc) in a safe environment. With good balance you can clean a lot of things by just continuing to pedal even when it looks like you might not make it. And, when you have a sense of what good balance feels like at slower speeds, its easier to keep it in the midst of a log hop or the like.

    Try bailing out a little earlier if things are going bad. If you wait until the last possible second to clip out you run a higher chance of not quite making it in time to prevent a fall.

    IMHO the point is to keep it in the 'fun zone' - too much skill and not enough difficulty is boring. Too much difficulty and not enough skill is frustrating and injury prone. The right mix is fun.

  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=William42]carefully cultivate a pair by yelling loudly and driving big trucks, and with a steady diet of mountain dew, redbull, steak, and hot dogs.

    Don't forget the chewing tobacco! Can't grow balls without a fat wad of snuff!

    I like what I am reading in this thread though. Don't ever be ashamed to walk. When you do decide to go for a new feature commitment is everything!

  14. #14
    Double-metric mtb man
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    I find a local bike park helps too. Start on the green stuff and work your way up as you build confidence. You'll be amazed by what it can do for your riding on the trial. My bike isn't made for park work, but I have run the park a few times and it has made a huge difference for my usual riding...more confidence and less being awed by trail features.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  15. #15
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    Buy as much armour as you can, full face, drop your seat, make sure your suspension is set up ok, and do what I did go and find some where that teaches mountain bike technical stuff, it helps so much to know the basics, instead of trying to make it up as you go along, also make sure your bike is upto the trails you are riding, it does make a differnce, trying to do freeride on an xc bike will hurt, and enjoy your self is the most important thing, and don't be bullied into doing too much.

  16. #16
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    I'll second the committing. the only times I have seriously eaten **** is when I didn't fully commit to the terrain, half way through a section I tried to wuss out and it took me out.

    Also speed is your friend, the faster you go on that rocky, rooty section the smoother it gets and the easier it is to maintain your line.

  17. #17
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    good advice above.... pads... momentum... skills/technique practice

    but also, I bet your fiance would love for you to ask how she gets through the technical bits. In my experience any of us who've learned certain techniques, and learned to clean technical sections and features... we love to talk about how to do it. I bet your fiance would too. Added plus... you'd be listening... and we all know women love when a man listens to them.

  18. #18
    ride hard take risks
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    What bike are you riding??
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  19. #19
    TLL
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    3 things, really.

    Patience. Progression takes time. Take the time to ride and re-ride small sections of a trail in order to get a feel for it. And drop the saddle when the going gets steep.

    Shin guards.

    Flat pedals.
    Hadley rear hub service here and here.

  20. #20
    Back at it and LOVIN' it!
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    I want to say THANKS to all the commentary on this thread...some really good replies - None of that "Get some balls you p*$$y" stuff and that is great to see!

    I'm at that same level of wanting to take it bigger and ballsier but I find myself not clearing some basic things and it is very frustrating but seeing where I was in July when I got back into biking after 15+ years and where I am now is a HUGE improvement - I...for me...slammed pretty hard and ended up getting some pads for a bit of a confidence boost and it has helped a bunch

    I said to myself today on our ride that 2 things I've learned that really help me get out of some jams is...

    momentum...keep pedaling through

    ...and balance
    Ride Hard - Ride Safe - Have Fun

    Go s#!t...I'm not a fish

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharacterZero
    Commitment is everything. Only when you commit ahead of time will you have the SPEED to carry you thru/over stuff. I crash on stuff all the time because I am going too slow.
    Yup and yup!

  22. #22
    ride hard take risks
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    Still would be nice to know what bikes there riding heck if his GF is riding a 7" travel bike and he's on a 3" travel that would explain allot, if their on equal bikes then all suggestions stand true.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    What bike are you riding??
    I'm either on a 07 Stumpjumper FSR or a Stumpy HT 29er (just got it).

    Here's some of us on Sunday. I didn't do this one.


    Me on the 29er. This stretch is right after a gnarly downhill rock garden.


    Fiance goofing off. I didn't have the guts for this either.

  24. #24
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by manowar669
    I'm either on a 07 Stumpjumper FSR or a Stumpy HT 29er (just got it).

    Me on the 29er. This stretch is right after a gnarly downhill rock garden.

    Stop looking at your front tire, chin up look ahead at all times. Either lower your seat post when doing steeps or get a Gravity Dropper type post for on the fly. Knee and shin guards like the TLD's.

    http://www.blueskycycling.com/produc...nee-Guards.htm

    A good book like the one by Lee Likes Bikes and Brian Lopes.

    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/
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  25. #25
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    I just went down to our local "bike park" for the first time after eating it on a set of tables. I think I will be a little hesitant when I go there to ride after my rib fully heals. Just do it I guess.

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